Casimir MacGregor

Casimir MacGregor
BRANZ

BA Hons, MA, DPH, PhD

About

65
Publications
9,769
Reads
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Citations
Introduction
My research explores sustainability transitions especially how people interact with socio-technical infrastructures. My research draws upon the theory and methods of sociology, science and technology studies, and public health. My current research interests are focused on climate change policy, energy epidemiology and climate justice especially ‘energy ethics' in the transition to net-zero carbon economy.
Additional affiliations
June 2016 - September 2020
BRANZ
Position
  • Researcher

Publications

Publications (65)
Article
The New Zealand Government has pledged to tackle the impacts of climate change by reducing all greenhouse gases (except biogenic methane) to zero by 2050. The construction sector, which contributes approximately 20% of New Zealand’s greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, needs to reduce its emissions if New Zealand is to meet the net-zero carbon target by...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The need to mitigate climate change calls for the construction industry to achieve net-zero greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for new and existing buildings by 2050. Zero carbon refurbishment (ZCR) for existing buildings is a significant area of interest, as many existing buildings will still be there in 2050. This paper investigates the global develo...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
To alleviate the climate change impacts, the construction industry needs to enhance the carbon performance of both new and existing buildings. The purpose of this paper is to examine the current decision support tools for building refurbishment and their applications to zero carbon refurbishment in the early design stages. A critical review was con...
Article
This research note summarises key aspects of housing in Aotearoa which has been reported under the mandate of the chief statistician. Housing in Aotearoa: 2020 was published in December 2020 and has a unique place in the provision of housing data and analysis. It brings together a comprehensive analysis of available housing information from officia...
Article
Full-text available
In the light of climate change, the drive for zero carbon buildings is known as one response to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Within New Zealand, research on climate change mitigation and environmental impacts of buildings has received renewed attention. However, there has been no detailed investigation of zero carbon building practices. This pa...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose This study aims to examine how innovation can be accelerated within the New Zealand (NZ) building industry to improve the productivity and efficiency of the industry. Design/methodology/approach The study adopted a mixed philosophical approach combining interpretivism and post-positivism. Data for the study were obtained through a focus gr...
Conference Paper
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Even if dwellings are supposed to offer comfortable spaces to people, the real estate literature does not often emphasize comfort as a relevant housing attribute. For instance, it is rarely mentioned as significant in the determination of housing prices. Part of the reason for this is that Comfort is not an easy concept to define and thus identifyi...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
It often argued that price, type, tenure, location and size are the most relevant housing attributes that people consider when making purchase decisions. While true, this paper utilizes qualitative data gathered through interviews to argue that these characteristics cannot fully explain people's housing choice. On the contrary, other housing attrib...
Chapter
Petersen et al. (Stem cell tourism and political economy of hope. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017) follow people from one clinical location to another in pursuit of stem cell treatments that are available in some parts of the world but not others.
Article
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Conference Paper
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There is a consensus among experts that consumers do not regard Indoor Environmental Quality (IEQ) attributes of dwellings as relevant when purchasing homes. Namely, they are not willing to pay more for naturally illuminated, warm, quiet, or easy to ventilate properties. However, other evidence suggests that consumers value IEQ when choosing the lo...
Article
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Most evidence suggesting that green labels can progressively transform the housing stock into a more sustainable one has been produced through hedonic regressions, showing that certified properties are sold with a price premium. This article demonstrates that this method is likely to estimate positive green premiums even if green labels are capable...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report outlines a survey of consumers’ attitudes and experiences of undertaking refurbishments and retrofits and their choices to go beyond the requirements of the New Zealand Building Code (NZBC) or not. The report focuses on existing residential buildings that had recently been or were in the process of undergoing a refurbishment/retrofit....
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This article examines how Australian providers of unproven autologous ‘stem cell treatments’ legitimise these products and their practices. We focus on the strategies employed by providers in their efforts to create and sustain a market for procedures that have yet to be proven safe and clinically efficacious. Drawing on the work of Thomas Gieryn a...
Article
Full-text available
This study sought to review the effectiveness of green labels on the residential real estate market. As past studies revealed, green labels increased property prices, which motivated developers to build more green certified buildings. However, contradictory studies revealed that many developers did not use green labels due to a lack of consumer dem...
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Conference Paper
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In 1956, the American Institute of Architects called for increased integration of architecture with the physical, biological, and social sciences. The aspiration to include other forms of knowledge to complement the contemporary emphasis on technology is telling. It begs the question; was this an effort to consolidate and strengthen architectural t...
Article
Background: The CRISPR/Cas system could provide an efficient and reliable means of editing the human genome and has the potential to revolutionise modern medicine; however, rapid developments are raising complex ethical issues. There has been significant scientific debate regarding the acceptability of some applications of CRISPR/Cas, with leaders...
Article
The growing availability of products labelled ‘superfoods’ has been a major marketing success story. While little scientific evidence supports the claims regarding the health-enhancing, age-defying benefits to be derived from the consumption of superfoods, marketers have been able to effectively promote these products for what they promise. This ar...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report examines consumer decision making about the choice to exceed minimum building standards as outlined in the New Zealand Building Code. A particular focus of research has been to examine the interactions between consumers and the building industry and the ability of consumers to make an informed decision to exceed the minimum. A qualitati...
Article
Full-text available
Over the last two decades, a vast and diverse market of commodities labelled ‘anti-ageing treatments’ has evolved. However, the establishment of this market has been far from smooth and uncontested. This article examines the news media as a crucial site for contestation over the meaning and legitimacy of ‘anti-ageing treatments’ during the period o...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Climate change presents one of the greatest challenges facing the world today. The built environment has a core part to play in how, as a society, we adapt and seek to mitigate the impacts of climate change. This research report examines the current scientific evidence and initiatives relating to the built environment and climate change and seeks t...
Article
Full-text available
Chapter
In this chapter, we discuss the creation, in 2007, of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) as an ethical alternative to human embryonic stem cells. In so doing, we raise a series of questions around the social, ethical and legal issues associated with iPSC. Drawing on empirical research, we explore results from an in-depth study into participant...
Chapter
In Australia, in recent years, there have been a number of news reports of patients
Chapter
As perhaps the most visible aspect of an increasingly global healthcare market, medical tourism would seem to epitomise the ‘consumer choice’ of free-market capitalism and everything that is seen to entail—namely, self-determination via freedom to decide treatments and travel, freedom of mobility, and the consumption of products and services that a...
Chapter
In Australia, in recent years, there have been a number of news reports of patients
Chapter
In Australia, in recent years, there have been a number of news reports of patients
Chapter
In Australia, in recent years, there have been a number of news reports of patients
Chapter
In Australia, in recent years, there have been a number of news reports of patients
Chapter
In Australia, in recent years, there have been a number of news reports of patients
Chapter
In Australia, in recent years, there have been a number of news reports of patients
Article
The prevention and control of ‘food fraud’, including false or misleading statements made about a product for economic gain, is now emerging as an important and discrete policy goal for governments and regulators in the interface between food and public health. The control and prevention of food fraud complements regulation to ensure microbial food...
Article
Full-text available
The ability to generate human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has opened new avenues for human disease modelling and therapy. The aim of our study was to determine research participants’ understanding of the information given when donating skin biopsies for the generation of patient-specific iPSCs. A customised 35-item questionnaire based on...
Article
Ongoing breakthroughs with CRISPR/Cas-based editing could potentially revolutionize modern medicine, but there are many questions to resolve about the ethical implications for its therapeutic application. We conducted a worldwide online survey of over 12,000 people recruited via social media to gauge attitudes toward this technology and discuss our...
Article
Heralded as an ethical alternative to human embryonic stem cells, the derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has opened novel avenues for disease modeling and cell-based therapy; however, with the increasing capacity for large-scale collections of individual iPSC lines there is a pressing need to ensure that prospective tissue donors...
Article
In this article, we examine how patients use digital media to gain access to treatments that have yet to be clinically proven as safe and effective. Making reference to the case of an Australian patient who achieved notoriety following a 60 Minutes television programme in 2014 following her travel to Russia to undertake stem cell treatment, in the...
Article
On arrival to the emergency department many older persons are accompanied by family/carers. Yet the role of family/carers in the emergency department is unclear. We know very little about how emergency department nurses balance care practices to accommodate family/carers while specifically meeting the needs of cognitively impaired older persons exp...
Article
This article considers the performativity of law in regard to constructing life as either human or non-human; personifying a 15-days group of cells while transforming a fully formed foetus to hospital waste. I suggest that the practice of a human rights approach to a sociology of bio-knowledge needs to attend to the contested nature of humanness an...
Article
The study aimed to explore the practice of care among emergency nurses caring for older persons with cognitive impairment and who presented in pain from a long bone fracture, to highlight nurse confidence and self-efficacy in practice. Cognitive impairment is an issue increasingly facing emergency departments. Older persons with cognitive impairmen...
Article
This study examines experiences of living with chronic illness for haemodialysis patients. In order to understand these experiences the paper takes an existential-phenomenological approach. Interviews of seven participants (5 male, 2 female) were collected in a haemodialysis clinic. Based upon the participants experiences three core themes emerged:...
Article
Background Older people who present to the emergency department (ED) often experience a significant delay to analgesia. This study compares the time to analgesia for cognitively impaired and cognitively intact older people diagnosed with a long bone fracture. Methods The aim of the study was to determine if cognitive impairment is associated with...
Article
Background Clinical competency is underpinned by the self-confidence of nurses to act. Confidence may be critical to the understanding of how practice choices are made and not made by nurses in extended practice roles. The aim of this study was to explore how emergency nurses perceived (i) self-confidence in undertaking an extended practice role; a...
Article
Analysis of public health's growing interest in “vulnerability” has largely focused on health policy, with little interrogation of how vulnerability is being actively appropriated, countered, ignored or reworked by the publics whose health such policy is designed to protect. Once the assemblage of public health is understood as comprised of differe...
Article
The Clinical Initiative Nurse (CIN) is a role that requires experienced emergency nurses to assess, initiate diagnostic tests, treat and manage a range of patient conditions. The CIN role is focused on the waiting room and to 'communicate the wait', initiate diagnostics or treatment and follow-up for waiting room patients. We aim to explore what em...
Article
Background: The emergency department (ED) is a dynamic environment, in which a high volume of undifferentiated patients with varying levels of urgency must be assessed and treated in a timely manner, primarily by nurses. Nurses not only provide initial but also continuing care for all patients presenting to the ED. Predicting the number of nurses...
Article
Anthropologist Paul Rabinow’s (1996) ethnographic engagement with the development of genetic technologies led him to observe that genetics are reshaping society and life because these are embedded throughout the social fabric of biopo-litical practices and discourses. Rabinow (1996) called his vision of the entanglement of nature and the social as...
Article
Full-text available
Urban regeneration as a public health intervention Urban design and planning are essential elements in how we navigate the social world. This is because urban environments typically constructed for social and cultural reasons, can create health inequalities within the urban landscape. Urban regeneration is the process of renewal or redevelopment of...
Article
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This thesis investigates public health through the influence of urban planning and people's experiences and perceptions of urban landscape (place and space in its geographical and humanistic understandings). This thesis in particular, examines the usefulness of urban regeneration as a way of addressing problems of health and social well-being in th...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Climate change presents one of the great challenges facing the world today. This project outlines some of my work that focuses on the transition to a low carbon economy.
Project
The aim of the project is to reveal how expectations shape new and emerging treatment markets. It will clarify the socio-cultural and legal factors sustaining expectations of treatments marketed as ‘anti-ageing’, including the respective roles played by those who produce, sell, regulate and consume them. The project will offer a new perspective on the operations of emerging medical treatment markets that will assist consumers and regulators. Funded by an Australian Research Council Discovery Grant – “A sociological analysis of the anti-ageing treatment market: the dynamics of expectation“, the project involves collaboration between Monash University’s School of Social Science and the Faculty of Law. See: http://artsonline.monash.edu.au/anti-ageing-market-research-project/