Casey M. Setash

Casey M. Setash
Colorado State University | CSU · Department of Fish, Wildlife and Conservation Biology

B.S. in Wildlife Science

About

3
Publications
980
Reads
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24
Citations
Citations since 2017
3 Research Items
24 Citations
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20172018201920202021202220230246810
Introduction
Casey M. Setash currently works at Colorado State University in the Department of Fish, Wildlife and Conservation Biology. Casey is a PhD student studying waterfowl population ecology.

Publications

Publications (3)
Article
Full-text available
Patterns of nest attendance in birds result from complex behaviours and influence the success of reproductive events. Incubation behaviours vary based on individual body condition, energy requirements, and environmental factors. We assessed nest attendance patterns in Cinnamon Teal Spatula cyanoptera breeding in the San Luis Valley of Colorado from...
Article
Full-text available
Nest survival of ducks is partially a function of the spatiotemporal characteristics of the site at which a bird chooses to nest. Nest survival is also a fundamental component of population growth in waterfowl but is relatively unstudied for cinnamon teal (Spatula cyanoptera). We investigated cinnamon teal nest survival in a managed wetland complex...
Article
Full-text available
1. Madagascar is home to the smallest primates in the world, the mouse lemurs (Microcebus species). Twenty-four species of mouse lemur are currently recognised and are found in variable ecosystems, from dry forests and spiny deserts to humid forests. Due to their widespread distribution and the large number of sympatric species, mouse lemurs can be...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
I am about to start a field season studying cinnamon teal population dynamics and we will be taking basic vegetation measurements at each nest we find.  I want to create a set of randomized points throughout the wildlife refuge in areas of different habitat, but I do not know how to determine how many points to create.  Should it be equal to the number of nests I find during each field season or should I use the same number of systematic random points each year?  Should they be in the same spots every year or should I re-randomize them in future field seasons?  It is a 14,000 acre wildlife refuge with impoundments, some of which will have water this year and some of which will not.  The teal mainly congregate in a couple of the main wet impoundments, which will therefore have very different vegetation characteristics than the dry.  Thank you for any help!

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