Casey Brienza

Casey Brienza
City, University of London · Department of Culture & Creative Industries

PhD

About

34
Publications
6,223
Reads
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181
Citations

Publications

Publications (34)
Article
This paper explores the efficacy of an international cultural policy based upon the export of a nation’s popular culture through the case study of Japanese comic books, called manga, in the USA. I begin by exploring the origin of the historical and theoretical underpinnings of ‘Cool Japan’ and providing a concise account of the Japanese cultural po...
Article
In this paper, I explore the ways in which the 2012 Elsevier boycott and resultant call for open access scholarship known as the “academic spring” have been taken up by scholars in the humanities and social sciences. I begin by reviewing the current state of affairs with regards to publishing and the academy, explicating the movement’s reasons for...
Article
Full-text available
E-books have grown to have a variety of meanings. The author describes the economic and institutional context of the rise of e-books, showing how e-books shift experiences of reading.
Article
This paper introduces a sociological approach to the study of art and literature and demonstrates its value as a methodological intervention in the field of comics studies. Known as the ‘production of culture’ perspective, this approach argues that all artistic work – including comics – is the product of collective, often routinized, human activity...
Article
Full-text available
US-American sociology has largely failed to examine the transformation of mediated communication of the past 20 years. If sociology is to be conceived as a general social science concerned with analyzing and critically scrutinizing past, present, and future conditions of collective human existence, this failure, and the ignorance it engenders,...
Article
Full-text available
This contribution is written against the backdrop of the historic dispersal of early American media sociology out from the core concerns of the discipline and into various importer academic disciplines (including communication, journalism, and media studies) and an ever-growing pervasiveness of media in everyday life which is ref lected by a resurg...
Article
Much has been written on the neoliberalization of the academy on the one hand and precarious creative labour/work in the culture industries on the other, but there has been comparatively little writing which makes explicit the intimate links between these two sociological phenomena and how they have come to complement and reinforce one another. Tak...
Chapter
How are we to understand a work of comic art without any knowledge of the myriad varieties of cultural work that went into its creation, and how might each better inform our understandings of the other? This book is an exploration and interrogation of these two questions. In the comics art world—a world that is still being mapped out and defined wi...
Article
Since Cambridge University mathematician Timothy Gower’s public boycott of Elsevier kicked off the so-called ‘academic spring’ in 2012, activist calls for open access academic publishing and the expansion of the scholarly knowledge commons through new digital technologies have only intensified. These have had direct, dramatic and fast-evolving impa...
Article
Though it is widely accepted that academic publishing has both communication and credentialing functions, there have been no systematic attempts to categorize journals according to their various socio-political aims since Toby Miller's intervention in the early 2000s. Yet one-third of all peer-reviewed academic journals currently in print did not e...
Book
Outside Japan, the term ‘manga’ usually refers to comics originally published in Japan. Yet nowadays many publications labelled ‘manga’ are not translations of Japanese works but rather have been wholly conceived and created elsewhere. These comics, although often derided and dismissed as ‘fake manga’, represent an important but understudied global...
Article
Fifty Shades of Grey began its proverbial textual life as fanfiction, a sexualized homage to Twilight, the vampire romance series written for the young adult fiction market by Stephanie Meyer. In 2011, the British author Erika Leonard, under the pen name E. L. James, released a revamped (excuse the pun) version of the story, which features a young...
Conference Paper
In 2007, Wired magazine published an article by Jason Thompson about how Japanese comics called manga had “conquered America.” In 2012, Takashi Murakami, in an interview for the Asahi Shimbun, disagreed with this assessment, arguing that manga is “only being accepted by a small group of fanatics” outside of Japan. Whether conceived of as a torrent...
Article
Japanese popular culture has, according to journalist Roland Kelts, “invaded” the United States in the 21st century, and in particular Japanese comics, known as manga, have successfully “conquered America,” according to Wired magazine. Within the publishing trade itself, the medium's cultural and commercial success became known as the “manga revolu...
Article
Full-text available
In this short contribution to the open access debate, I will draw upon my expertise as a sociologist who has studied the publishing industry to argue that publishers do in fact have knowledge that is absolutely critical to an informed understanding of open access and how it may be successfully implemented. After providing an overview of who publish...
Article
Fields of scholarship are segregated into discrete linguistic territories, and comics studies is no exception. Theory derived from European language sources predominate, both informing the latest advances in research and structuring areas of future enquiry. This results in a certain amount of intellectual stagnation. In this article, I will argue t...
Article
Culture Keeping: White Mothers, International Adoption, and the Negotiation of Family Difference By Heather Jacobson Vanderbilt University Press, 2008 216 pages Call Me Okaasan: Adventures in Multicultural Mothering Edited by Suzanne Kamata Wyatt-MacKenzie Publishing, 2009 224 pages Kimchi & Calamari By Rose Kent Har perCollins, 2007 240 pages
Article
The market for Japanese comics, called manga, in the United States grew rapidly at the beginning of the twenty first century at a rate unprecedented in the publishing industry. Sales grew a remarkable 350% from 60 million in 2002 to60 million in 2002 to 210 million in 2007 and did not begin to decline until the beginning of the recent economic down...

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