Carys Evans

Carys Evans
University College London | UCL · Sobell Department of Motor Neuroscience and Movement Disorders

BSc (Hons.), MSc, PhD

About

18
Publications
1,087
Reads
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140
Citations
Introduction
My main research interest is in cognitive neuroscience, neuropsychology, and understanding neurological illness to aid rehabilitation. Specifically, I am interested in examining dissociations in processing that have been further understood through research with patients and neuro-modulation techniques.
Additional affiliations
July 2018 - present
University College London
Position
  • Research Associate
February 2015 - July 2016
Goldsmiths, University of London
Position
  • Postdoctoral Research Assistant
Description
  • I am currently involved in a funded project exploring the effect of transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS) on mood in later life with Dr Rebecca Charlton and Dr Michael Banissy at Goldsmiths, University of London.
October 2011 - May 2015
Northumbria University
Position
  • PhD Student
Description
  • I investigated object-use after stroke and the role of the frontoparietal network in generating mental representations of movement to inform action. Specifically I explored the implications of apraxia and brain stimulation on perception for action.
Education
October 2011 - May 2015
Northumbria University
Field of study
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
October 2010 - September 2011
Durham University
Field of study
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
October 2007 - July 2010
Durham University
Field of study
  • Applied Psychology

Publications

Publications (18)
Article
Full-text available
The direction of applied electric current relative to the cortical surface is a key determinant of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) effects. Inter-individual differences in anatomy affect the consistency of current direction at a cortical target, likely leading to inter-individual variability in current direction. However, the degree...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose of Review Transcranial electrical stimulation (tES) is used to non-invasively modulate brain activity in health and disease. Current flow modeling (CFM) provides estimates of where and how much electrical current is delivered to in the brain during tES. It therefore holds promise as a method to reduce commonplace variability in tES delivery...
Article
Full-text available
Skill learning is a fundamental adaptive process, but the mechanisms remain poorly understood. Some learning paradigms, particularly in the memory domain, are closely associated with gamma activity that is amplitude-modulated by the phase of underlying theta activity, but whether such nested activity patterns also underpin skill learning is unknown...
Preprint
Transcranial electrical stimulation (tES) is used to non-invasively modulate brain activity in health and disease. Current flow modeling (CFM) provides estimates of where, and how much electrical current is delivered to the brain during tES. It therefore holds promise as a method to reduce commonplace variability in tES delivery and, in turn, the o...
Preprint
Background Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been used to enhance motor and language rehabilitation following a stroke. However, improving the effectiveness of clinical tDCS protocols depends on understanding how a lesion may influence tDCS-induced current flow through the brain. Objective We systematically investigated the effect...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background Variable effects limit the efficacy of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) as a research and therapeutic tool. Conventional application of a fixed-dose of tDCS does not account for inter-individual differences in anatomy (e.g. skull thickness), which varies the amount of current reaching the brain. Individualised dose-control...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Variable effects limit the efficacy of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) as a research and therapeutic tool. Conventional application of a fixed-dose of tDCS does not account for inter-individual differences in anatomy (e.g. skull thickness), which varies the amount of current reaching the brain. Individualised dose-contro...
Article
Objectives: To assess whether changes in brain microstructures associated with ageing and presence of cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) reduce the efficacy of transcranial electrical stimulation (tES) improving mood in euthymic older adults. Methods: Using excitatory high-frequency transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS) over bilateral dor...
Article
Full-text available
This multiple single case study contrasted left hemisphere stroke patients (N = 6) to healthy age-matched control participants (N = 15) on their understanding of action (e.g., holding, clenching) and motion verbs (e.g., crumbling, flowing). The tasks required participants to correctly identify the matching verb or associated picture. Dissociations...
Article
This study evaluated whether apraxia can be understood as due to impaired motor representations or motor imagery necessary for appropriate object-use, imitation, and pantomime. The causal role of the left inferior parietal lobe (IPL), which is heavily implicated in apraxia, is also evaluated. These processes are appraised in light of the proposed v...
Article
Full-text available
Preoccupation and compulsive use of the internet can have negative psychological effects, such that it is increasingly being recognized as a mental disorder. The present study employed network-based statistics to explore how whole-brain functional connections at rest is related to the extent of individual’s level of internet addiction, indexed by a...

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