Caroline Jane Edmonds

Caroline Jane Edmonds
University of East London | UEL · Department of Psychology

BSc, PhD

About

62
Publications
9,048
Reads
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1,372
Citations
Introduction
Caroline Edmonds is a Professor of Experimental Psychology at UEL and Visiting Professor at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton. Caroline's interests include the effect of hydration and drinking water on cognitive performance and mood; the long term neurocognitive development of children with hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE) and the effect of premature birth and intrauterine growth restriction on cognition.
Additional affiliations
October 2007 - present
University of East London
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
June 2000 - October 2007
University College London
Position
  • Research Associate

Publications

Publications (62)
Article
Full-text available
Evidence shows that having a drink of water can improve cognitive performance in schoolchildren. This study investigated whether water consumption would improve a range of tasks requiring both cognitive and fine motor skills. Participants were 85 children (37 boys, 48 girls, mean age 10.1 years, SD = 0.6) attending a primary school in the UK. Child...
Article
Full-text available
Previous studies suggest that acute water drinking interventions enhance working memory, particularly digit span. The aims of the present study were twofold. Firstly, to investigate whether the working memory enhancements extend to different components of working memory. Secondly, to evaluate whether drinking water would improve long-term memory ta...
Article
Background Research investigating neuromotor function in the absence of cerebral palsy (CP) for children who had neonatal HIE is limited. Aims To investigate school-age neurological and neuromotor function, and correlations with attention, neonatal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), and neuromotor assessments at toddler age. Methods Twenty-seven c...
Article
Full-text available
Aim We aimed to determine whether children with neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE) treated with therapeutic hypothermia (TH) differ from their peers on measures of fine motor skills, executive function, language and general cognitive abilities; factors that are important for school readiness. Methods We compared school readiness in 31...
Article
Full-text available
Drinking water is important for health and there is an agreement that drinking water facilitates certain cognitive processes. However, the mechanism underlying the effect of drinking water on cognition is unknown. While attention performance is improved by even a very small drink, memory performance seems to require larger drinks for performance en...
Article
Objective : To systematically examine the effect of dehydration on health outcomes, identify associated financial costs and consider impacts on cognitive performance in older adults. Design : A systematic review of English-language articles via OVID using MEDLINE, PsychINFO, EMBASE, and others, to March 2018. Included studies examined the relation...
Article
The increasing adoption of educational technology in school classrooms has resulted in greater use of electronic devices to take lesson notes. Recent research comparing performance of adult students who recorded lecture notes using computer keyboards with that of students who handwrote their notes shows somewhat conflicting findings about their fac...
Article
Background Neurodevelopmental follow-up in Neonatal Hypoxic Ischaemic Encephalopathy (HIE) typically focusses on major neuromotor (cerebral palsy, CP) and severe cognitive impairment. Outcomes in those without major neuromotor impairment are less well explored. Objectives To examine behavioural, cognitive and neurological outcomes after neonatal H...
Poster
Full-text available
Parental preferences and attitudes to food and drink has a direct influence on the consumption and dietary preference of their children 1. Water is recommended as the first choice drink for children (alongside milk) as it does not contain free sugars, thus does not contribute extra calories nor harm teeth 2. Our pilot study evaluated parents' attit...
Poster
Full-text available
Parental attitudes to food and drink influence children’s choices. Water is recommended as the first choice drink for children (alongside milk) as it does not contain free sugars, thus does not contribute extra calories nor harm teeth. Our pilot study evaluated parents’ attitudes to drinking water and their own and their children’s drink choices. 2...
Poster
Full-text available
Children drink insufficient fluid during the school day and class teachers can play an important role in influencing the amount that children drink. Our pilot study evaluated teachers’ attitudes to children drinking water in the classroom and strategies for increasing drinking. Sixty-six teachers from four London primary schools participated in an...
Article
Full-text available
Children who were growth restricted in utero (FGR) and are born small for gestational age (SGA) may experience poorer long term neurological and cognitive outcomes. Those also born preterm may have particular difficulties. The objective of this paper was to review the literature on school age neurocognitive outcome for term and preterm children tha...
Article
Full-text available
Adequate provision of safe water, basic sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) facilities and behavior change can reduce pupil absence and infectious disease. Increased drinking water quantity may also improve educational outcomes through the effect of hydration on attention, concentration, and short-term memory. A pilot study was conducted to adapt field...
Conference Paper
Background and Aims: Despite the introduction of hypothermia treatment (HT), children with neonatalhypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) HIE are at increased risk of severe neuromotor impairment (Cerebral Palsy, CP) and developmental impairment.Information on school-age outcomes in the substantial proportion who survive without CP is limited. Here...
Article
There is general consensus that drinking water facilitates certain cognitive processes. However, it is not yet known what mechanism underlies the effect of drinking on performance and these may be different for different cognitive processes. We sought to elucidate the mechanisms involved by establishing at what stage of the drinking process cogniti...
Article
Full-text available
Experiments demonstrating level-1 visual perspective-taking have been interpreted as providing important evidence for ‘implicit mentalising’—the ability to track simple mental states in a fast and efficient manner. However, this interpretation has been contested by a rival ‘submentalising’ account that proposes that these experiments can be explain...
Article
Full-text available
Experiments revealing ‘spontaneous’ visual perspective-taking are conventionally interpreted as demonstrating that adults have the capacity to track simple mental states in a fast and efficient manner (‘implicit mentalising’). A rival account suggests that these experiments can be explained by the general purpose mechanisms responsible for reflexiv...
Article
Water supplementation has been found to facilitate visual attention and short-term memory, but the dose required to improve performance is not yet known. We assessed the dose response effect of water on thirst, mood and cognitive performance in both adults and children. Participants were offered either no water, 25 ml or 300 ml water to drink. Stud...
Article
This study investigated the impact that mouth rinsing carbohydrate solution has on skill-specific performance and reaction time following a fatigue inducing bout of fencing in epee fencers. Nine healthy, national level epee fencers visited a laboratory on 2 occasions, separated by a minimum of 5 days, to complete a 1-minute lunge test and Stroop te...
Article
Contemporary studies of spatial and social cognition frequently use human figures as stimuli. The interpretation of such studies may be complicated by spatial compatibility effects that emerge when researchers employ spatial responses, and participants spontaneously code spatial relationships about an observed body. Yet, the nature of these spatial...
Poster
Full-text available
The ergogenic effect of carbohydrate (CHO) ingestion both pre and during endurance sport has been well documented (Shabort et al, 1999). Carter et al. (2004) were the first to have subsequently established a performance effect of CHO independent of blood glycogen levels signalling a potential key role of the central nervous system in mediating CHO...
Article
Full-text available
The aim of this study was to examine the effect of carbohydrate mouth rinse on 30-min arm cranking performance. Twelve healthy, active males (age 21.6, standard deviation (SD)=3.1 years; mass 76.2, SD=12.2 kg) volunteered in a single-blind, randomised crossover design. Firstly they completed an incremental exercise test to exhaustion (VO2max test)...
Article
Full-text available
On April 7-8, 2014, the European Hydration Institute hosted a small group of experts at Castle Combe Manor House, United Kingdom, to discuss a range of issues related to human hydration, health, and performance. The meeting included 18 recognized experts who brought a wealth of experience and knowledge to the topics under review. Eight selected top...
Article
Full-text available
Previous research provides evidence for a dissociable embodied route to spatial perspective-taking that is under strategic control. The present experiment investigated further the influence of strategy on spatial perspective-taking by assessing whether participants may also elect to employ a separable "disembodied" route loading on inhibitory contr...
Article
Full-text available
Participants (N = 34) undertook a CANTAB battery on two separate occasions after fasting and abstaining from fluid intake since the previous evening. On one occasion they were offered 500 ml water shortly before testing, and on the other occasion no water was consumed prior to testing. Reaction times, as measured by Simple Reaction Time (SRT), were...
Article
Developmental dyscalculia is a significant neural deficit with broad social impact. A number of techniques have been used to identify the brain basis of dyscalculia, and many of these have highlighted the role of the intraparietal sulci and a left fronto-parietal network in the representation of core number skills. These studies offer conflicting e...
Article
Full-text available
Evidence suggests that a proportion of children may come to school in a dehydrated state. Dehydration can have negative effects on both physical and cognitive performance. Furthermore, a proportion of children may drink less than the minimum recommended amount whilst at school. There is an emerging literature on the positive effects of water consum...
Article
Dehydration has negative effects on cognitive performance and mood in both adults and children. There is some evidence that having a drink of water results in improved cognition in thirsty adults. Recent studies in children have shown that drinking additional water is associated with better performance on tests of memory and attention. Performance...
Article
Little research to date has examined whether sex differences in spatial ability extend to the mental self rotation involved in taking on a third party perspective. This question was addressed in the present study by assessing components of imagined perspective transformations in twenty men and twenty women. Participants made speeded left-right judg...
Article
Full-text available
Aluminium is the most common metallic element, but has no known biological role. It accumulates in the body when protective gastrointestinal mechanisms are bypassed, renal function is impaired, or exposure is high - all of which apply frequently to preterm infants. Recognised clinical manifestations of aluminium toxicity include dementia, anaemia a...
Article
We explored whether caffeine, and expectation of having consumed caffeine, affects attention, reward responsivity and mood using double-blinded methodology. 88 participants were randomly allocated to 'drink-type' (caffeinated/decaffeinated coffee) and 'expectancy' (told caffeinated/told decaffeinated coffee) manipulations. Both caffeine and expecta...
Article
Full-text available
Given the adverse neurobiological effects of suboptimal nutrition on the developing brain, it is of social and medical importance to determine if the global prevalence of poor intrauterine growth causes lasting cognitive deficits. We examined whether suboptimal intrauterine growth relates to impaired cognitive outcome by comparing birth weight and...
Article
Full-text available
Aluminum has known neurotoxicity and may impair short-term bone health. In a randomized trial, we showed reduced neurodevelopmental scores in preterm infants who were previously exposed to aluminum from parenteral nutrition solutions. Here, in the same cohort, we test the hypothesis that neonatal aluminum exposure also adversely affects long-term b...
Article
Little research has examined the effect of water consumption on cognition in children. We examined whether drinking water improves performance from baseline to test in twenty-three 6-7-year-old children. There were significant interactions between time of test and water group (water/no water), with improvements in the water group on thirst and happ...
Article
While dehydration has well-documented negative effects on adult cognition, there is little research on hydration and cognitive performance in children. We investigated whether having a drink of water improved children's performance on cognitive tasks. Fifty-eight children aged 7-9 years old were randomly allocated to a group that received additiona...
Article
We studied the age-related differences in inspection time and multiple cognitive domains in a group of monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins aged 7 to 17 years. Data from 111 twin pairs and 19 singleton siblings were included. We found clear age-related trends towards more efficient visual information processing in older participants. There wer...
Article
The two experiments reported here investigated the ability of sighted children and children with visual impairment to comprehend text and, in particular, to draw inferences both while reading and while listening. Children were assigned into `comprehension skill' groups, depending on the degree to which their reading comprehension skill was in line...
Article
Full-text available
Although IQ is thought to remain relatively stable in the normal population, a decline in IQ has been noted in children born preterm. It is not clear, however, to what extent the inclusion of children with clear neurological damage has influenced these findings. We examined IQ scores obtained in childhood and then again in adolescence from a group...
Article
Children born preterm provide a fruitful population for studying structure-function relationships because they often have specific functional deficits in the context of normal neurological status. We selected a group of preterm adolescents with deficits in judgment of line orientation. Despite their very low birth weight, all were neurologically no...
Article
Full-text available
Learning difficulties, including problems with numeracy, are common in Western populations. Many children with learning difficulty are survivors of preterm birth. Although some of these children have neurological disabilities, many are neurologically normal, and the latter group provides us with an important opportunity to investigate the neural ba...

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