Carol Cleaveland

Carol Cleaveland
George Mason University | GMU · Department of Social Work

Doctor of Philosophy

About

37
Publications
19,385
Reads
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296
Citations
Citations since 2016
21 Research Items
200 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022010203040
2016201720182019202020212022010203040
Introduction
Dr. Carol Cleaveland is an Associate Professor of Social Work at George Mason University who specializes in ethnography and qualitative research. She has been researching Latino immigration since 2004, when she began working with Mexican day laborers in Freehold, N.J., to understand how they negotiated police harassment and anti-immigrant ordinances. Since 2013, her work has focused on Latinas from Central America with her recent inquiry examining how they navigate claims for asylum in the USA.
Additional affiliations
September 2007 - present
George Mason University
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
Education
September 1994 - May 2020
Bryn Mawr College
Field of study
  • Social Work

Publications

Publications (37)
Article
Full-text available
Using semistructured interviews and participant observation, this two-year pilot study of male Mexican migrants in Freehold, New Jersey, explored how day laborers perceive their struggles to support families despite escalating anti-immigrant legislation at virtually all levels of government. In particular, the author looks at efforts by Mexican mig...
Article
Full-text available
■ Lacking access to legal residency and to regular employment, undocumented Latinos in the USA often find work as day laborers. Some suburban towns have tried to force Latinos out by enacting statutes to restrict their movement and their search for jobs. How do day laborers, who are conspicuous because of their racial-ethnic and language difference...
Article
Full-text available
Facing poverty and an inability to support their families through work on small farms or in waged labor, Mexican workers have crossed the border in large numbers seeking work in the US. This study explores the experiences of Mexican workers who immigrated without authorization to find work in a US suburban community in construction and the service...
Article
Full-text available
This article presents findings from an exploratory, mixed methods study to: (1) Ascertain whether Latina immigrant clients of a healthcare clinic for uninsured patients suffer a higher rate of PTSD compared to the citizen population at large and (2) Explore whether factors unique to immigrants, such as surviving human smuggling, would predict PTSD....
Article
Latina migrants often suffer rape, assaults, and gun violence during unauthorized immigration from Mexico to the US. Despite widespread violence during immigration to the US, social work scholarship on this issue is sparse. This article seeks to close that gap by examining the narratives of women who survived smuggling from Mexico. Social workers w...
Article
Background: Latinos have suffered disproportionate adversity during the COVID-19 pandemic. Many studies have focused on comparing Latinos to other groups, potentially masking critical concerns within population. This study identifies potential pathways to poor mental health among Latinos during the pandemic. Methods: Data from US Census Househol...
Article
Full-text available
As has been documented in public health data, infections and deaths from COVID-19 have been inequitably distributed in the United States, producing adverse health outcomes among vulnerable populations including Latina immigrants. Using a critical feminist theoretical perspective, this discussion examines the mechanisms informing these outcomes incl...
Article
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Social work scholarship on neoliberalism—the dominant ideology and policies shaping access to housing, jobs, healthcare, and education—is in its infancy. This study examines the ground-level impact of the subprime mortgage crisis that triggered the Great Recession in 2008, examining how homeowners interpreted the changes to their neighborhood as th...
Presentation
Full-text available
Mixed methods: * In-depth, qualitative interviews with survivors of human smuggling (n=13). * 2 validated instruments (n=62), PTSD CheckList for Civilians (PCL-C) and THQ (Trauma History Questionnaire) with Latina immigrants in two clinics. Findings show that undocumented Latinas have high PTSD burden (30%) and lack access to treatment. Length of s...
Article
Although the associations among interpersonal- and community-level violence and substance use have been well-studied, the mechanisms of change that underlie each have not garnered the same level of attention. We offer an analysis that views both violence and addiction as the inevitable by-products of inequitably constructed social spaces, where pov...
Article
Full-text available
An estimated 10 million undocumented immigrants now live in the United States, prompting calls for law enforcement crackdowns and pleas for stringent immigration controls. Social workers and agencies lack the resources to address the needs of this population and are often hindered in service delivery efforts by local anti-immigrant ordinances. This...
Article
Full-text available
This article presents data from a two-year case study using multiple qualitative methods to probe how residents of a suburban area interpreted the question of settlement by undocumented Latino immigrants in their neighborhoods. Though many residents framed their understanding of neighborhood problems via racialized portrayals alluding to ‘inferior’...
Article
Full-text available
This qualitative study examines the lived experiences of Latina immigrants who settled in an area that enacted one of the United State's most draconian anti-immigrant initiatives—a law that would be a precursor for Arizona's SB 1070. Though this investigation was prompted by the law's adoption in 2007, interviews and 18 months of ethnographic obser...
Article
Full-text available
This article presents findings from a qualitative study of Latino immigrant experiences seeking health care services in the wake of an anti-immigrant “crackdown” ordinance similar to Arizona's SB 1070. Prince William County, Virginia's 2007 “Rule of Law” ordinance escalated law enforcement efforts that targeted this population for deportation and o...
Article
Full-text available
An estimated 10 million undocumented immigrants now live in the United States, prompting calls for law enforcement crackdowns and pleas for stringent immigration controls. Social workers and agencies lack the resources to address the needs of this population and are often hindered in service delivery efforts by local anti-immigrant ordinances. This...
Article
Full-text available
Lacking access to social services, unauthorized Mexican day laborers constitute a vulnerable population. This case study uses a critical theory perspective to examine activist efforts to support migrants when professional social workers were unavailable. Using qualitative methods, this study sought to answer three questions: (1) What strategies did...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Purpose: Undocumented migration has become a polarizing political issue, with both immigration rights protests and anti-immigration groups mobilizing across the nation. An estimated 9.3 million undocumented workers now live in the United States (Passel, Fix & Capps, 2004), taking unskilled jobs at low wages and prompting some lawmakers to call for...
Article
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Welfare has been stigmatized as a benefit for poor African-Americans, in particular for blacks accused of sexual promiscuity and a weak work ethic. Stigma has been found to demoralize welfare recipients, alienate middle-class voters who resent tax expenditures for public assistance, and fuel conservative support for legislation limiting welfare. Th...
Article
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Using participanto bservation data and structuredi nterviews,t hisa rticle examines the strategiesM exican men use to negotiate survival while presenting themselves in public to findw ork. We argue thatm igrant men are conscious of theirm arginalized role in the shared social space of a particular town, and regularly develop strategies to minimize...
Article
Full-text available
An estimated 10 million undocumented immigrants now live in the United States, prompting calls for law enforcement crackdowns and pleas for stringent immigration controls. Social workers and agencies lack the resources to address the needs of this population and are often hindered in service delivery efforts by local anti-immigrant ordinances. This...
Article
Full-text available
The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 allowed states to impose sanctions, that is, to revoke cash assistance for nonpregnant women on welfare as punishment for noncompliance with the new work requirements. In addition, the law called for women's benefits from Temporary Assistance for Needy Family benefits to be...
Article
Full-text available
The purpose of thispilot study was to explore howsocial workstudents enrolled in a research course report their thoughts,feelings. andsatisfaction with the research process. A pretestandpositest, self-report measures. the State-Trait Anxiety Scale (Y1). and subscales of the Research Process Survey wereusedto track the thoughts. feelings. andactions...
Article
Full-text available
Sentiments favoring a sweeping overhaul of the United States’ social welfare system culminated in the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) in 1996 - a law that mandates states to move almost all recipients from cash assistance on welfare to paid work. This ethnographic study examined work refusal among women who...

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