Carmela Patrias

Carmela Patrias
Brock University · Department of History

Doctor of Philosophy

About

24
Publications
1,888
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402
Citations
Citations since 2017
2 Research Items
153 Citations
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Publications

Publications (24)
Article
After World War II, minority activists and their Anglo-Canadian allies convinced the Ontario Ministry of Education to bring the Springfield Plan to Welland, Ontario, as a pilot project to combat racist and religious prejudice through the public school system. Pioneered in Springfield, Massachusetts, the Plan taught children the importance of tolera...
Article
THIS STUDY EXPLORES EMPLOYERS' anti-union strategies in the Niagara Peninsula from the mid-1940s to the mid-1960s in order to enhance our understanding of the nature of relations between labour and capital during the period generally described as that of the postwar compromise. Relying on such unexplored archival collections as the papers of the St...
Article
By the mid-twentieth century, working-class immigrant neighbourhoods, or “foreign quarters,” in Canadian cities succeeded in electing members of minority ethnic groups to various levels of government in Canada. As Gerald Tulchinsky’s fascinating biography makes clear, Joe Salsberg, a Polish-born Jew who served as alderman for Toronto’s Ward 4 from...
Article
In the aftermath of World War II, educational policy makers and administrators placed great emphasis on preparing students to become equal, autonomous participants in the democratic order. They were reacting initially against the horrors of the Holocaust and totalitarianism, but as the Cold War intensified attention shifted to combatting “godless”...
Article
Christopher G. Anderson, a political scientist at Wilfrid Laurier University, argues that from the time of Confederation the rights-based claims of non-citizens and their supporters vied with a strategy of rights-restrictive control in shaping Canada’s immigration policies. Liberal internationalism, which stressed the rights of non-citizens vis-à-v...
Article
This article examines the varied understandings of human rights in Ontario in the immediate aftermath of the Second World War. The article compares the social origins and implementation of Ontario's Fair Employment Practices Act - which combatted racist and religious discrimination with Ontario's Female Employees Fair Remuneration Act - which manda...
Book
Full-text available
From factory workers in Welland to retail workers in St. Catharines, from hospitality workers in Niagara Falls to migrant farm workers in Niagara-On-The-Lake, Union Power showcases the role of working people in the Niagara region. Charting the development of the region's labour movement from the early nineteenth century to the present, Patrias and...
Article
Until recently, the language and character of available sources often converged with the specific interests of investigators wanting to encourage a focus on the history of particular ethnic or immigrant groups in Canada. By their very nature, such studies, while highly valuable contributions to a larger mosaic, cannot capture the complex patterns o...
Book
Despite acute labour shortages during the Second World War, Canadian employers—with the complicity of state officials—discriminated against workers of African, Asian, and Eastern and Southern European origin, excluding them from both white collar and skilled jobs. Jobs and Justice argues that, while the war intensified hostility and suspicion towar...
Article
The study shows that the crisis of war reinforced pre-existing social and economic inequality based on racist views and practices. War-induced anxieties intensified suspicion of "foreigners" - a term which encompassed large numbers of Canadian-born and naturalized people of Japanese, central, eastern, and sourthern European descent and Jews - as un...
Article
Full-text available
The Canadian Historical Review 87.2 (2006) 265-292 'I would suggest, Mr Speaker, that this is perhaps the most important bill that ever came before this house … in importance, it will rank with the British North America Act.' With these words Attorney General J.W. Corman introduced the Saskatchewan Bill of Rights Act in the provincial legislature i...
Book
The years between 1870 and 1939 were a crucial period in the growth of industrial capitalism in Canada, as well as a time when many women joined the paid workforce. Yet despite the increase in employment, women faced a difficult struggle in gaining fair remuneration for their work and in gaining access to better jobs. Discounted Labour analyses the...
Article
This article examines the social origins of the campaigns for human rights in Ontario, focusing on the period from the Second World War to the early 1950s. A wide variety of organizations eventually supported the human rights activists' struggles fro legislation that would outlaw discrimination on the basis of 'race,' religion, ancestry, and nation...

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