Carlos Cabido

Carlos Cabido
Aranzadi Science Society · Herpetology

PhD

About

40
Publications
9,682
Reads
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241
Citations
Citations since 2017
16 Research Items
168 Citations
2017201820192020202120222023051015202530
2017201820192020202120222023051015202530
2017201820192020202120222023051015202530
2017201820192020202120222023051015202530
Additional affiliations
December 2012 - present
Aranzadi Science Society
Position
  • Head of Department
March 2009 - present
Aranzadi Science Society
Position
  • Researcher
January 2002 - February 2009
The National Museum of Natural Sciences
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (40)
Article
The genus Karyolysus was originally proposed to accommodate blood parasites of lacertid lizards in Western Europe. However, recent phylogenetic analyses suggested an inconclusive taxonomic position of these parasites of the order Adeleorina based on the available genetic information. Inconsistencies between molecular phylogeny, morphology, and/or l...
Technical Report
In collaboration with the Botanical Department team in Aranzadi, we mapped and pin-pointed unique trees and groves of interest in Donostia-San Sebastián
Article
Full-text available
• Rapid human-induced transformation of habitats is presenting organisms with challenging novel environmental conditions. Nowadays, extensive areas of the world are covered by exotic plantations, and among these, eucalypt plantations stand out for their worldwide occurrence. These novel environments probably threaten the persistence of native speci...
Article
Full-text available
Las plantaciones de eucalipto (género Eucalyptus) tienen una amplia distribución a escala global y causan preocupación por los efectos que pueden ocasionar sobre el medio ambiente. En este trabajo revisamos la evolución de la superficie cubierta por los eucaliptos en Euskadi y evaluamos sus efectos ambientales a partir de la bibliografía científica...
Article
Full-text available
Dentro de un programa de censo poblacional de anfibios en espacios protegidos del País Vasco y Navarra se ha abordado la cuantificación de sus individuos en años comprendidos entre 2004 y 2018 en el Parque Natural de las sierras de Urbasa y Andía (ocho años) y las Zonas Especiales de Conservación de la sierra de Aralar (tres años) y Roncesvalles-Se...
Article
Full-text available
Entre 2010 y 2017 se censaron las poblaciones de anfibios en una serie de humedales de los parques naturales de Izki y Valderejo (Álava) durante la estación reproductora y el periodo de desarrollo larvario, con el objetivo de analizar su tendencia. Se constata el declive de especies típicamente mediterráneas en ambos parques, en especial de Discogl...
Article
Full-text available
Consequences of human actions like global warming, spread of exotic species or resource consumption are pushing species to extinction. Even species considered to be at low extinction risk often show signs of local declines. Here, we evaluate the impact of eucalypt plantations, the best-known exotic tree species worldwide and its interaction with te...
Article
Full-text available
Previous studies suggest that immune-challenged individuals need to allocate resources to the immune system to combat infection, reducing escape ability and increasing the vulnerability of infected individuals to predators. Such behavioural responses might change in anthropogenic habitats where the balance between predation risk and countering infe...
Article
Current and past parasite transmission may depend on the geographic contact between hosts, potentially affecting host specificity and co-evolutionary processes. Nonetheless, divergent evolution in sympatry might be especially relevant in parasite systems that infect hosts with low mobility. Here, we test the co-speciation hypothesis between lizard...
Article
Full-text available
Environmental conditions experienced by a species during its evolutionary history may shape the signals it uses for communication. Consequently, rapid environmental changes may lead to less effective signals, which interfere with communication between individuals, altering life history traits such as predator detection and mate searching. Increased...
Article
Full-text available
Does urbanization affect key life-history traits in native organisms? Some studies show that urban areas reduce diversity in certain taxa, but there is little insight into how these environments affect physiological and ecological traits. Urban areas have distinct physical structure and ecological processes compared to original habitats. The enviro...
Article
Full-text available
Chemical communication in aquatic species can affect many key life history traits, such as prey and predator detection and mate searching. However, changes in the environment can disrupt the effectiveness of signals and the ability of individuals to detect these signals. Many studies have examined the effect of secondary compounds from exotic plant...
Article
Full-text available
Selection can favor phenotypic plasticity in mate choice in response to environmental factors that alter the costs and benefits of being choosy, or of choosing specific mates. Human-induced environmental change could alter sexual selection by affecting the costs of mate choice, or by impairing the ability of individuals to identify preferred mates....
Article
Full-text available
Lizards often respond to predators by hiding in sunless refuges, but this eliminates opportunities for thermoregulatory basking. Hiding can therefore lower body condition. Furthermore, in ectotherms basking is important to induce fever and activate an immune response. A potential trade-off therefore exists between lowering predation risk and elevat...
Poster
Full-text available
Evolutionary responses to new environments can include adjustments in phenotype and physiology. Non-native eucalyptus plantations represent a widespread new forest environment for fauna in many regions of the world. Eucalyptus trees release allelopathic substances into the substrate and waterways, which modify the species composition and can reduce...
Preprint
Full-text available
What effect do tree plantations have on the diversity of native organisms? Some studies show that plantations reduce the diversity and abundance of certain taxa, while other studies suggested that plantations help to conserve biodiversity. Pine and eucalyptus plantations are among the most widespread exotic plantations worldwide, and they have nega...
Article
Full-text available
Background The optimal allocation of resources to sexual signals and other life history traits is usually dependent on an individual’s condition, while variation in the expression of sexual traits across environments depends on the combined effects of local adaptation, mean condition, and phenotypic responses to environment-specific cues that affec...
Article
Chemical signals play an important role in intraspecific communication and social organization of many animals, but they also may be useful in interspecific recognition. In lizards, chemical signals are often contained in femoral gland secretions, of which composition may vary between species and populations. This may be especially important in rec...
Article
Full-text available
El criterio fundamental para considerar que una especie es alóctona en el territorio español se basa en la constatación de que la coloniza-ción no ha sido natural, sino de origen antró-pico. Según este criterio, debemos considerar como poblaciones alóctonas la mayoría de las tratadas en este volumen, con algunas excepcio-nes como Testudo graeca en...
Article
Full-text available
Predation imposes selection on the ability of prey to recognize and respond to potential threats. Many prey species detect predators via chemoreception, particularly in aquatic environments. Also, chemical cues from injured prey are often perceived as an indication of predation risk. However, because antipredatory behavior can be costly, prey respo...
Article
Full-text available
The Natterjack toad remains one of the best-studied amphibians within Europe and much of the research conducted has had a direct conservation focus. Long-term collaboration between researchers and conservation practitioners in different countries has been a hallmark of the programme, and the exchange of data and experiences has been of mutual benef...
Article
Full-text available
Sexual selection favors more conspicuous male displays, whereas natural selection (via predator pressure) favors less conspicuous displays. However, this trade-off might be altered if males with more conspicuous displays could compensate behaviorally for their increased conspicuousness by acting more cautiously toward predators. The aim of this stu...
Article
Full-text available
In amphibians, adults and larvae have different ecological requirements that could force recently metamorphosed individuals to disperse. The presence of chemical cues of conspecifics and predators could provide information about habitat quality, which might influence the juveniles' settlement decisions. We examined in the laboratory whether pond ch...
Article
Full-text available
We tested the ability of male slow-worms, Anguis fragilis, a limbless anguid lizard with secretive, semifossorial habits, to detect chemical associated with conspecifics by using a T-maze in the laboratory. Male slow-worms discriminated conspecific male and female scent deposits. Males selected the arm with female scent, suggesting that scent depos...
Article
Full-text available
Many antipredator adaptations are induced or mediated by the ability of the prey to recognize chemical cues from the predator. This ability is particularly advantageous for organisms whose environment precludes the effective use of other sensory systems, such as fossorial lizards. We tested the ability of the slow-worm, Anguis fragilis Linnaeus, 17...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
The replacement of the natural forest for exotic tree plantations can cause important changes in diversity and community composition at local and regional scales. Studies about tree plantations have focused mainly on patterns of abundance and diversity of different taxa, but very few researches have progressed into mechanistic ecology, such as the behavioural ecology of species interactions and evolution. Eucalypt plantations release toxic substances into the soil and waterways, reduce water yields, and change physical characteristics of environment. The combined effect of the structure change and the exposure to novel chemical compounds produced by exotic plants may represent cryptic threats to native fauna inhabiting (or surviving in) plantations. The aim of the present project is to explore the effects of eucalyptus plantations on ecological and behavioural aspects of amphibians. We try to understand why some amphibian species can survive in eucalyptus plantations, while others don't; and we also try to predict the evolutionary and conservation consequences that these new habitats have.