Carlos Barreto

Carlos Barreto
Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry · Ontario Forest Research Institute

PhD

About

19
Publications
3,998
Reads
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82
Citations
Additional affiliations
February 2016 - August 2016
Carste Ciencia e Meio Ambiente
Position
  • Laboratory Manager
Description
  • Sampling fauna of invertebrates in caves and karstic environments (Brazil): - Laboratory management - Speleology reports - Identification of cave invertebrates - Curator of a biological collection
February 2013 - February 2016
Carste Ciencia e Meio Ambiente
Position
  • Researcher
Description
  • - Sampling invertebrates in caves and karstic environments (Brazil): - Taxonomy of Homoptera, Heteroptera and Psocoptera - Speleology reports
Education
September 2016 - August 2021
The University of Western Ontario
Field of study
  • Soil Ecology

Publications

Publications (19)
Article
Soils systems provide essential ecosystem functions and services performed by a hyperdiverse array of fauna, but how soil communities respond to climate change remains an understudied topic. Although previous long-term studies have found variable effects of climate change manipulations on soil communities, precipitation often yields strong response...
Article
Full-text available
A checklist of the oribatid mite species from two boreal fens in Northern Ontario, Canada is presented. 174 peat soil samples, collected between 2015-2020, yielded a heterogeneous assemblage of 80 species, 57 genera and 33 families. Species richness and diversity were significantly higher in a Sphagnum-dominated fen (69 species) compared to a Carex...
Article
Climate warming is expected to disproportionately affect high latitude and alpine systems such as boreal peatlands. Previous studies observing changes in both plant and microbial communities suggest boreal peatlands may shift from carbon sinks to sources under warming. But few studies have investigated oribatid mites (Acari: Oribatida) under climat...
Article
Soil systems are highly biodiverse and responsible for important ecosystem processes such as decomposition, nutrient cycling, and carbon storage. Aspects of global change, including CO2 enrichment, climate change, land use alteration, and shifts in aboveground biodiversity all have the potential to affect soil biodiversity, as well as the ecosystem...
Article
Free-living soil nematodes span several trophic levels and play a key role in soil food webs. As such, the relative abundances and diversity of nematode feeding groups, along with nematode body size that is correlated with trophic transfer efficiency may provide useful information in understanding carbon and nitrogen cycling in soil systems. Yet, d...
Thesis
Full-text available
Boreal peatlands are important ecosystems for carbon cycling, storing 1/3 of the world’s terrestrial carbon in only ~3% of the globe, making them a key component of potential mitigation strategies in response to global climate warming. Experiments have shown that warming can affect plant and microbial communities in ways that potentially shift peat...
Article
Full-text available
Small animals living in soils, called soil invertebrates, represent a very diverse group of soil inhabitants. They include earthworms, woodlice, spiders, springtails, mites, and some insects. Soil invertebrates feed on dead plants, on fungi and bacteria, or on other soil invertebrates. The many ways soil invertebrates interact with each other, and...
Article
Full-text available
The Rhodniini tribe is one of the five tribes in the subfamily Triatominae and is notorious for its domestic blood-sucking pests and vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi across Latin America. The human and economic costs of the Chagas disease in the American tropics are considerable, and these insects are of unquestionable importance to humans. We used mit...
Article
Full-text available
Oribatid mites are a group of animals related to spiders, scorpions, and ticks. However, they are typically much smaller (most are < 1 mm) and are full of defensive mechanisms to protect them from predators. Generally, oribatid mites live in soils and feed on fungi, bacteria, and soil particles, making them very important for decomposition processe...
Article
Full-text available
All soils store carbon. As plants grow, they take up carbon from the atmosphere and this carbon enters the soil when they die. This dead plant material slowly decomposes as organisms, such as bacteria, fungi, and tiny animals called mites and springtails use this carbon as a food source. Decomposition is very slow in peatlands, and as a result, muc...
Article
Full-text available
Microplastics are defined as plastic particles that are <5mm. Manufactured in the production of many commercial products, microplastics have become an environmental threat for many organisms. Microplastics can be highly abundant in soil, and given their size, can interact with soil microarthropods. But how microplastics affect soil-dwelling organis...
Article
Nysius simulans (Stål) is a suctorial, fluid feeding herbivore that can transmit toxins and spread pathogens via saliva and is an economically important pest for soybean in South America. Currently, N. simulans in soybean is predominantly found in Argentina, but future changes in the distribution from both dispersal and range shifts due to climate...
Article
Full-text available
Bulletin of the Entomological Society of Canada
Research Proposal
Full-text available
Newsletter of the Biological Survey of Canada - Student Corner
Article
In boreal peatlands, low decomposition rate is the underlying cause of carbon sequestration. Decomposition of litter can be affected by factors relating to soil moisture and temperature, the quality of the litter, and by the biotic decomposer community, among others. Exploring how these drivers interact will provide better understanding of carbon d...
Technical Report
Relevance analysis and Speleological diagnosis of Fazenda dos Borges Project [in Portuguese]
Technical Report
Full-text available
Bioespeleological monitoring of Mata Grande I Project [in Portuguese]

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Characterize cave biodiversity.
Project
Project involves biogeography and systematics of Heteroptera.
Project
Food webs describe feeding relationships among species and are most often studied in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems compared to belowground (soil) systems. However, soil systems are responsible for important ecosystem processes such as decomposition, recycling of nutrients, and carbon storage. How soil food webs will respond to global change factors is not yet well understood, nor what the outcomes of altered food web structure will be on ecosystem-level processes. In soil systems, increased productivity of microbes and their consumers are anticipated to accelerate decomposition and increase rates of nutrient cycling, increasing carbon release from soil stocks, particularly in boreal peatlands that are globally significant carbon sinks. I will address the effects of climate change on soil community structure and ecosystem processes using a food web approach, by examining the responses of induced warming scenarios across two field-based experiments. I will also perform controlled lab-based mesocosm studies under warming, nutrient and predator addition, and disentangle how energy (i.e. carbon) flows from the basal resource (i.e. detritus) through bacterial and/or fungal channels in response to warming and plant litter quality. Lastly, I will develop a food web model specific to peatlands and estimate energy flows.