Carlo Cerrano

Carlo Cerrano
Università Politecnica delle Marche | Università degli Studi di Ancona · Department of Life and Environmental Sciences - DiSVA

PhD

About

419
Publications
103,439
Reads
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Citations
Introduction
Carlo Cerrano currently works at the Department of Life and Environmental Sciences - DiSVA, Università Politecnica delle Marche. Carlo does research in Marine Invertebrates Zoology, Biology and Ecology. Current projects are 'Merces', 'Mesomed', 'Adriatic recovery project', 'MPA-engage', 'Medspon'
Additional affiliations
January 2000 - October 2011
Università degli Studi di Genova
Position
  • Researcher

Publications

Publications (419)
Article
Savalia savaglia is an Atlantic-Mediterranean zoantharian species with a patchy geographic and bathymetric distribution. Due to its longevity, S. savaglia may form large-sized colonies which play a crucial role in the ecosystem as habitat formers. Despite its ecological importance, little is known about the population structure and intraspecific ge...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change is causing an increase in the frequency and intensity of marine heatwaves (MHWs) and mass mortality events (MMEs) of marine organisms are one of their main ecological impacts. Here, we show that during the 2015–2019 period, the Mediterranean Sea has experienced exceptional thermal conditions resulting in the onset of five consecutive...
Article
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The carbonatic scleraxis of Corallium rubrum (L.), commonly known as red coral, is often found infested by excavating sponges. These boring organisms produce galleries inside the compact axis of the coral in a variety of shapes compromising the integrity of the skeleton and reducing its commercial value. Three sponge species, already known to bore...
Article
Savalia savaglia is an ecosystem engineer listed as Near-Threatened by the IUCN, even though effective management and proper monitoring efforts to assess its distribution is still lacking. The record of large, long-established colonies can indicate the occurrence of areas with limited human local pressure. These areas may be considered as proxies f...
Preprint
The accurate delimitation of species boundaries in non-bilaterian marine taxa is notoriously difficult, with consequences for many studies in ecology and evolution. Anthozoans are a diverse group of key structural organisms worldwide, but the lack of reliable morphological characters and informative genetic markers hampers our ability to understand...
Article
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Since antiquity, the sense of smell (olfaction) is considered as a distance sense, just like sight and hearing. Conversely, the sense of taste (gustation) is thought to operate by direct contact, similarly to touch. With the progress of natural sciences, information at molecular, anatomical, and neurobiological levels has also contributed to the ta...
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Gallinara Island, a small island located 1.5 km off the shore of Liguria (Italy, north-western Mediterranean Sea) was included in a list of proposed Marine Protected Areas (MPA) in the early 90s. Since then, its benthic assemblages have been studied in detail and the main macrophytic communities have been mapped. A detailed assessment of its benthi...
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Considering the pivotal role played by erosive organisms in the marine habitat and the scanty knowledge of this phenomenon in the Mediterranean Sea, the present study aimed to identify the pioneer excavating organisms occurring in the first stages of bioerosion, providing the first estimation of their rate of erosion along the North Adriatic Sea. B...
Article
The aggregation of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells has resulted in evolution of organisms with remarkable abilities to synthetize natural bioactive compounds of biotechnological relevance. Marine sponges such as Petrosia ficiformis are examples of this evolutionary strategy. The P. ficiformis microbiome, which produces a diversity of chemical comp...
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Marine sponges are the driver of many critical biological processes throughout various ecosystems. But anthropogenic and environmental pressures are rapidly compromising the diversity and abundance of Porifera worldwide. In our study, we reviewed the main experiences made on their cultivation to provide a roadmap of the best methodologies that coul...
Article
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Corallium rubrum has been exploited by humankind for centuries. The long-term exploitation dynamics of this species make it even more important today to increase protection and restoration efforts as it provides a significant range of ecosystem services. This becomes even more important in areas where natural recovery is hindered or unlikely. So fa...
Article
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Global warming is causing the increase in intensity and frequency of heatwaves, which are often associated with mass mortality events of marine organisms from shallow and mesophotic rocky habitats, including gorgonians and other sessile organisms. We investigated the microbiome responses of the gorgonians Paramuricea clavata, Eunicella cavolini, an...
Chapter
Sandy beaches are iconic marine environments comprising most of the world’s open-ocean coasts, and providing important goods and services. Their position at the land-sea interface renders high socio-economic and ecological value, but also enhances their vulnerability to impacts, e.g., from inappropriate coastal development, high coastal population...
Article
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Marine sponges host a wide diversity of microorganisms, which have versatile modes of carbon and energy metabolism. In this study we describe the major lithoheterotrophic and autotrophic processes in 21 microbial sponge-associated phyla using novel and existing genomic and transcriptomic datasets. We show that the main microbial carbon fixation pat...
Article
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Although the biometric investigation of the cnidome represents an essential diagnostic feature to successfully identify cnidarian species, further efforts are needed to fully characterize eventual differences. Important model actiniarians, such Anemonia viridis and Aiptasia spp., are commonly used for scientific purposes; however, their identificat...
Article
Litter reduction in the coastal and marine environment represents a major challenge but must be prioritized to preserve biodiversity and ecosystems, as well as the goods and services that humans derive from seas and oceans. This paper reviews the available global scientific literature focusing on marine beach litter and tracks its evolution and tre...
Article
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Canopy-forming macroalgae play a crucial role in coastal primary production and nutrient cycling, providing food, shelter, nurseries, and habitat for many vertebrate and invertebrate species. However, macroalgal forests are in decline in various places and natural recovery is almost impossible when populations become locally extinct. Hence, active...
Article
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Global change is striking harder and faster in the Mediterranean Sea than elsewhere, where high levels of human pressure and proneness to climate change interact in modifying the structure and disrupting regulative mechanisms of marine ecosystems. Rocky reefs are particularly exposed to such environmental changes with ongoing trends of degradation...
Article
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According to current experimental evidence, coral reefs could disappear within the century if CO2 emissions remain unabated. However, recent discoveries of diverse and high cover reefs that already live under extreme conditions suggest that some corals might thrive well under hot, high-pCO2, and deoxygenated seawater. Volcanic CO2 vents, semi-enclo...
Preprint
Full-text available
In this study we describe the major lithoheterotrophic and autotrophic processes in 21 microbial sponge-associated phyla using novel and existing genomic and transcriptomic datasets. We show that a single gene family, molybdenum-binding subunit of dehydrogenase (coxL), likely evolved to benefit both lithoheterotrophic and organoheterotrophic symbio...
Article
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Since 2001, trained snorkelers, freedivers, and scuba diver volunteers (collectively called EcoDivers) have been recording data on the distribution, abundance, and bathymetric range of 43 selected key marine species along the Mediterranean Sea coasts using the Reef Check Mediterranean Underwater Coastal Environment Monitoring (RCMed U-CEM) protocol...
Preprint
Full-text available
According to current experimental evidence, coral reefs could disappear within the century if CO2 emissions remain unabated. However, recent discoveries of diverse and high cover reefs that already thrive under extreme conditions seem to contradict these projections. Volcanic CO2 vents, semi-enclosed lagoons and mangrove estuaries are unique study...
Article
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The dating of young submarine volcanic eruptions, with their potential generation of tsunamigenic waves, is essential for a reliable hazard assessment. This is particularly relevant in highly populated coastal areas. The scarce knowledge of the underwater environment makes however, this reconstruction challenging. Our study is focused on the NW sec...
Article
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Microplastics are recognised as a potential global threat to marine ecosystems, but the biological mechanisms determining their impact on marine life are still largely unknown. Here, we investigated the effects of microplastics on the red coral, a long-lived habitat-forming organism belonging to the Corallium genus, which is present at almost all l...
Article
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Marine animal forests are benthic communities dominated by sessile suspension feeders (such as sponges, corals, and bivalves) able to generate three-dimensional (3D) frameworks with high structural complexity. The biodiversity and functioning of marine animal forests are strictly related to their 3D complexity. The present paper aims at providing n...
Article
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Citizen science (CS) projects may provide community-based ecosystem monitoring, expanding our ability to collect data across space and time. However, the data from CS are often not effectively integrated into institutional monitoring programs and decision-making processes, especially in marine conservation. This limitation is partially due to diffi...
Chapter
The Ha Long Bay (Vietnam) is a shallow area located in the northern part of the Tonkin Gulf, in the South China Sea. It includes more than 3000 islands of variable sizes. A continuous action of karstic processes, initiating around 280 million of years ago, shaped the formation of extraordinary caves and shallow salt-water lakes. These impressive st...
Chapter
Cat Ba islands, located in the North East of Vietnam, in the area of Ha Long City (Quang Ninh Province) and Cat Hai Island District (Hai Phong City), is the largest limestone archipelago in Vietnam. Typical limestone islands including tropical rainforests, caves, mangroves, tidal ecosystems, coral reefs, and soft-bottom ecosystems characterized the...
Conference Paper
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The parasitic zoanthid Savalia savaglia (Bertoloni, 1819), gold coral, is known to be always associated to dense populations of gorgonians such as Paramuricea clavata, on which Savalia is used to start its colonization. Hereby a population of 11 large colonies is described. The investigated dive spot is located at a depth of approximately 30 m off...
Article
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Cahong in Ha Long Bay (Vietnam) is a small lake with a reduced, invisible connection with the open sea. The water column conditions locally experience notable fluctuations across the year, mostly driven by biannual monsoon seasons. Salinity, temperature, and pH often reach extreme values, unsustainable for the majority of the marine fauna. Therefor...
Article
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In the Mediterranean Sea, the symbiosis between the gorgonian Paramuricea clavata (Risso, 1826) and the polychaete Haplosyllis chamaeleon Laubier, 1960 (Annelida, Syllidae, Syllinae) has only been documented from the western basin. Our findings extend its geographic distribution to the north-central basin and represent the first record of H. chamae...
Article
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This work aims at presenting an underwater image application to obtain an improved 3D model of cultural assets. In 2016, more than 500 images were acquired by a GoPro Camera with a low resolution of 72 dpi and focal length of 3 mm, without flash and are now used to reconstruct the 3D model of some amphoras of a Roman shipwreck found in Albenga (Ita...
Article
Population dynamics in lower metazoans are strongly regulated by environmental factors. The running climate crisis could affect regularity of life strategies; therefore, studying life cycles and reproductive patterns of benthic species may provide key information on effects of environmental changes in temperate seas. The North Adriatic Sea is a pec...
Article
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Members of the order Comatulida (Echinodermata: Crinoidea) are widely distributed on Indo-Pacific reefs, where they host a highly diverse and understudied cryptofauna, which makes them a potential source of hidden biodiversity. In this study, shallow-water crinoid populations and their symbiotic communities from the Bangka Archipelago (North Sulawe...
Article
We investigated possible synergic effects on coral reefs of the local land reclamation activities in the Himmafushi Island (North Malè atoll, Maldives) and the global bleaching event that affected the Maldives in 2016. A BACI (Before-After Control-Impact) sampling design was adopted to contrast effects of dredging activities before and after the oc...
Article
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The aim of this research is to set a successful strategy for engaging citizen marine scientists and to obtain reliable data on marine species. The case study of this work is the bearded fireworm Hermodice carunculata, a charismatic species spreading from the southern Mediterranean probably in relation to global warming. To achieve research objectiv...
Article
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The diversity of Porifera from Ponta do Ouro (Mozambique) has been evaluated; this paper presents the first taxonomic effort devoted to sponges in the area, while studies of closeby areas are quite dated. Overall, 55 specimens were examined, leading to 26 described species; among these, four are new (Hyattella sulfurea Calcinai & Belfiore sp. nov.,...
Article
The alien seagrass Halophila stipulacea has invaded the Mediterranean Sea from the Red Sea more than 120 y ago, and first recorded in the western Mediterranean Sea in 1995 (Vulcano island, Sicily). The species has further expanded ∼110 nautical miles northward, reaching the harbour of Palinuro (Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy) in 2006, which currently repres...
Article
In this study we used in situ transplantations to provide the first evidence of horizontal acquisition of cyanobacterial symbionts by a marine sponge. The acquisition of the symbionts by the host sponge Petrosia ficiformis, which was observed in distinct visible patches, appeared several months after transplantation and at different times on differ...
Article
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Sandy beaches provide several ecosystem services such as coastal protection and resilience, water filtration and nutrient mineralization. Beaches also represent a hub for social, cultural and economic relationships as well as educational activities. Increasing urbanization, recreational activities and mechanical beach cleaning represent major anthr...
Article
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To understand the restoration potential of degraded habitats, it is important to know the key processes and habitat features that allow for recovery after disturbance. As part of the EU (Horizon 2020) funded MERCES project, a group of European experts compiled and assessed current knowledge, from both past and ongoing restoration efforts, within th...
Article
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Biodiversity loss and climate change simultaneously threaten marine ecosystems, yet their interactions remain largely unknown. Ocean acidification severely affects a wide variety of marine organisms and recent studies have predicted major impacts at the pH conditions expected for 2100. However, despite the renowned interdependence between biodivers...
Article
1. Sharks are globally exposed to several anthropogenic threats, which, in many cases, have severely reduced their distribution and have impacted populations. In the Mediterranean Sea, because of its long history of exploitation and the relatively short span of scientific monitoring, reconstructing shark baselines is challenging. Many vulnerable sp...
Chapter
The ocean is a complex three-dimensional world covering approximately 71% of the Earth’s surface offering a huge potential of new discoveries in all the fields of science. The hope is that these discoveries, if adequately supported and implemented, could lead to the finding of sustainable solutions inspiring new technologies and growth strategies....
Article
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Submarine canyons play pivotal roles in the physical, biological and ecological processes of coastal areas, especially in closed or semi-closed basins as the Mediterranean Sea, influencing the biodiversity and the abundance of the benthic fauna. On February 2013, during the Tyrrhenian Gravity Flows (TyGraF) campaign, samples have been collected alo...
Article
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Recreational diving is known to have both direct and indirect impacts on coral habitats. Direct impacts include increasing sedimentation, breaks and diseases that lead to a decrease in the richness and abundances of hard corals. Indirect impacts include urban development, land management and sewage disposal. The ecological effects of scuba diving o...