Carine I. Parent

Carine I. Parent
McGill University | McGill · Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery

PhD

About

25
Publications
2,301
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825
Citations

Publications

Publications (25)
Article
Full-text available
Depression and anxiety are major global health burdens. Although SSRIs targeting the serotonergic system are prescribed over 200 million times annually, they have variable therapeutic efficacy and side effects, and mechanisms of action remain incompletely understood. Here, we comprehensively characterise the molecular landscape of gene regulatory c...
Preprint
Psychiatric and cardio-metabolic conditions are commonly comorbid, being a leading cause of disability. Early adversity is a risk factor for both conditions, however, biological pathways remain unknown. The dopamine (DA) system is sensitive to early adversity and influences the development of comorbidities. We hypothesized that early life adversity...
Article
Full-text available
The multifactorial etiology of stress-related disorders necessitates a constant interrogation of the molecular convergences in preclinical models of stress that use disparate paradigms as stressors spanning from environmental challenges to genetic predisposition to hormonal signaling. Using RNA-sequencing, we investigated the genomic signatures in...
Article
Full-text available
While the co-morbidity between metabolic and psychiatric behaviors is well-established, the mechanisms are poorly understood, and exposure to early life adversity (ELA) is a common developmental risk factor. ELA is associated with altered insulin sensitivity and poor behavioral inhibition throughout life, which seems to contribute to the developmen...
Preprint
Full-text available
The multifactorial etiology of stress-related disorders is a challenge in developing synchronized medical standards for treatment and diagnosis. It is largely unknown whether there exists molecular convergence in preclinical models of stress generated using disparate construct validity. Using RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq), we investigated the genomic si...
Article
Some individuals exposed to early life stress show evidence of enhanced systemic inflammation and are at greater risk for psychopathology. In the current study, caregivers and their offspring (0-17 years) were recruited at a pediatric clinic visit at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). Mothers and seven-year-old children from the Gr...
Article
Full-text available
Pre-natal exposure to acute maternal trauma or chronic maternal distress can confer increased risk for psychiatric disorders in later life. Acute maternal trauma is the result of unforeseen environmental or personal catastrophes, while chronic maternal distress is associated with anxiety or depression. Animal studies investigating the effects of pr...
Article
Maternal antenatal depression strongly influences child mental health but with considerable inter-individual variation that is, in part, linked to genotype. The challenge is to effectively capture the genotypic influence. We outline a novel approach to describe genomic susceptibility to maternal antenatal depression focusing on child emotional/beha...
Article
Objective: The Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) and Maternal Adversity, Vulnerability and Neurodevelopment (MAVAN) cohorts were used to determine whether repeated exposure to gastroenteritis in early life could predict risk for psychiatric problems in childhood and in ALSPAC adolescents. We determined whether inflammatory b...
Article
Full-text available
Individuals born after intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) are more impulsive towards palatable foods, but it is not clear 1) if IUGR-related impulsivity is specific for foods and solely based on response inhibition and 2) if the development of impulsivity is due to being born IUGR per se or to growing up fast in the first few years of life (cat...
Article
Several studies have shown that children with eczema, which is the most common form of cutaneous allergy, have an increased prevalence of psychological and behavioural problems or mental health disorders (1). Higher rates of anxiety and depression have been found in females than males with eczema (2) in adult studies, but the role that sex plays in...
Article
While many studies focus on the association between early life adversity and the later risk for psychopathology, few simultaneously explore diverse forms of environmental adversity. Moreover, those studies that examined the cumulative impact of early life adversity focus uniquely on postnatal influences. The objective of this study was to focus on...
Article
Maternal care shapes individual differences in fear-associated neural circuitry. In rats, maternal licking and grooming (LG) in early life regulates ventral hippocampal (VH) function and plasticity in adulthood, but its consequent effect on the regulation of fear memories remains unknown. We report an effect of maternal care on generalization of le...
Article
Early life adversity increases the risk for later infection. The febrile response is a potent mechanism to combat infection. We found that variations in maternal care influence the febrile response to 50 µg/kg lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge in adult male rats. Offspring from low-licking/grooming (LG) mothers had an increased febrile response co...
Chapter
There are numerous examples in the behavioral sciences of the enduring effects of early experience on neural and immune function. In this article we review the emerging evidence for epigenetics as a candidate mechanism for these effects. Epigenetics refers to functionally relevant modifications to the genome that do not involve a change in nucleoti...
Article
Variations in maternal care influence important life history traits that determine reproductive fitness. The adult female offspring of mothers that show reduced levels of pup licking/grooming (LG; i.e., low-LG mothers) show increased defensive responses to stress, accelerated pubertal development, and greater sexual receptivity than the female offs...
Article
Naturally occurring variations in maternal care in the rat influence the sensitivity of offspring to stress in adulthood. The offspring of mothers that show lower levels of pup licking/grooming (i.e., low-LG mothers) demonstrate enhanced responses to stress and increased anxiety compared to those of high-LG mothers. Low-LG offspring are also more s...
Article
There are profound maternal effects on individual differences in defensive responses and reproductive strategies in species ranging literally from plants to insects to birds. Maternal effects commonly reflect the quality of the environment and are most likely mediated by the quality of the maternal provision (egg, propagule, etc.), which in turn de...
Article
Familial transmission of mental illness is common. Recent studies in behavioral neuroscience and biological psychiatry reveal the importance of epigenetic mechanisms of transmission that center on the developmental consequences of variations in parental care. Studies with rats suggest that environmental adversity results in patterns of parent-offsp...
Article
There are profound maternal effects on individual differences in defensive responses and reproductive strategies in species ranging literally from plants to insects to birds. Maternal effects commonly reflect the quality of the environment and are most likely mediated by the quality of the maternal provision (egg, propagule, etc.), which in turn de...
Article
Full-text available
This paper describes the results of a series of studies showing that variations in mother-pup interactions program the development of individual differences in behavioral and endocrine stress responses in the rat. These effects are associated with altered expression of genes in brain regions, such as the amygdala, hippocampus, and hypothalamus, tha...

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