Cari D. Goetz

Cari D. Goetz
California State University, San Bernardino | CSUSB · Department of Psychology

PhD

About

22
Publications
22,010
Reads
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759
Citations
Citations since 2016
10 Research Items
527 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022020406080
2016201720182019202020212022020406080
2016201720182019202020212022020406080
Introduction
Cari D. Goetz currently works at the Department of Psychology, California State University, San Bernardino. Cari does research in Evolutionary Psychology, specifically human mating strategies and mating-related psychology. her most recent publication is 'Mate Value Discrepancies, the Dark Triad and Relationship Satisfaction: a Euclidean Distances Approach'.
Additional affiliations
September 2014 - April 2016
California State University, San Bernardino
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
August 2007 - May 2014
University of Texas at Austin
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (22)
Preprint
Full-text available
We respond to Gallup’s (2020) opinion piece by indicating that psychologists have yet to agree on an operationalized definition of “intelligence.” We offer our understanding of the literature that a decline of human intelligence is mixed; additionally, if a decline in human intelligence was supported, evolutionary scholars are not in a position to...
Article
Full-text available
Evolutionary mismatch concepts are being fruitfully employed in a number of research domains, including medicine, health, and human cognition and behavior to generate novel hypotheses and better understand existing findings. We contend that research on human mating will benefit from explicitly addressing both the evolutionary mismatch of the people...
Article
Mate value discrepancies (MVDs) predict multiple outcomes in romantic relationships, including relationship satisfaction, jealousy, and forgiveness. We tested the hypotheses that MVDs would predict anger and shame in response to both medium and strong transgressions within romantic relationships. Participants in long-term committed relationships re...
Article
Full-text available
We used a Euclidean algorithmic method of calculating mate value discrepancies to test the hypothesis that mate value discrepancies would mediate a negative association between the Dark Triad and relationship satisfaction. Participants (N = 211) rated themselves, their partner, and their ideal partner on a set of traits known to be important in mat...
Article
Leaving one mating relationship and entering another, serial mating, is commonly observed in many cultures. An array of circumstances can prompt a mate switch. These include (1) unanticipated costs inflicted by one's mate, or ‘relationship load,’ not apparent on the initial mate selection; (2) changes in the mate value of either partner, creating d...
Article
We test a novel evolutionary hypothesis predicting that mate value discrepancies, but not mate preference fulfillment, will regulate relationship satisfaction. Across Study 1 (n=259) and Study 2 (n=300), we employed new Euclidean measures able to capture preference fulfillment and compute estimates of mate value discrepancies. Relationship satisfac...
Article
Human long-term mating is an evolutionary mystery. Here, we suggest that evolutionary game theory provides three essential components of a good theory of long-term mating. Modeling long-term relationships as public goods games parsimoniously explains the adaptive problems long-term mating solved, identifies the novel adaptive problems long-term mat...
Article
Evolutionary perspectives on human mating have generated a substantial corpus of work that reveals important sex differences in mate choice and preferences. Both men and women engage in multiple mating strategies, from long-term committed relationships to short-term sexual liaisons. This article summarizes how sex-specific adaptive problems faced b...
Article
Research has documented that men are sexually attracted to women displaying cues to sexual exploitability. The current study investigated individual differences hypothesized to predict the display of exploitability cues as a mate attraction tactic. It was predicted that women who are more inclined toward short-term mating, high in openness, and hig...
Article
Full-text available
Two studies examined women's perception of the relationship between sexual exploitability and sexual attractiveness and women's use of cues to sexual exploitability to signal sexual accessibility. Study 1 (N = 77) found that women accurately assessed other women displaying cues to sexual exploitability both as sexually exploitable and sexually attr...
Article
Full-text available
This study examined women's video dating profiles to determine what their advertised mate preferences revealed about their mate value and relationship interests. Women created a one-minute long video dating profile for a hypothetical dating website. The videos were content analyzed into four categories of stated mate preferences: 1) "good genes" in...
Article
Full-text available
Although antiexploitation adaptations, such as cheater-detection mechanisms, have been well explored, comparatively little research has focused on identifying adaptations for exploitation. The present study had two purposes: (1) to identify observable cues that afford information about which women are sexually exploitable and (2) to test the hypoth...
Article
The constituents of attractiveness differ across the sexes. Many relevant traits are dimorphic, suggesting that they are the product of intersexual selection. However, direction of causality is generally difficult to determine, as aesthetic criteria can as readily result from, as cause, dimorphism. Women have proportionately smaller feet than men....
Article
Previous research suggests men are sexually attracted to women displaying cues to sexual exploitability. During human evolutionary history, men’s agreeableness, orientation towards casual sex, and relationship status may have been recurrently associated with greater net benefits of pursuing a sexually exploitative strategy. We hypothesized these th...
Article
Full-text available
Replies to comments on Evolutionary psychology: Controversies, questions, prospects, and limitations (see record 2010-02208-001) by Confer et al. The purpose of which was to clarify the logic of evolutionary psychology and clear up some of the more common misunderstandings about it. In this response, we address the key points raised by the commenta...
Article
Beginning in their late twenties, women face the unique adaptive problem of declining fertility eventually terminating at menopause. We hypothesize women have evolved a reproduction expediting psychological adaptation designed to capitalize on their remaining fertility. The present study tested predictions based on this hypothesis—these women will...
Article
Full-text available
Evolutionary psychology has emerged over the past 15 years as a major theoretical perspective, generating an increasing volume of empirical studies and assuming a larger presence within psychological science. At the same time, it has generated critiques and remains controversial among some psychologists. Some of the controversy stems from hypothese...
Article
Full-text available
We propose that middle childhood female ambivalent attachment, given the adaptive problem of uncertainty of future investment, is designed to evoke immediate investment from current caregivers, rather than new investment sources. We suggest greater specificity of strategic attachment solutions to adaptive problems that differ by sex, time, and rela...

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Projects (2)