Caren C Dymond

Caren C Dymond
Ministry of Forests | FLNRO · Forest Carbon and Climate Services Branch

Doctor of Philosophy, Bangor University, 2018

About

64
Publications
15,386
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5,905
Citations
Citations since 2016
15 Research Items
2556 Citations
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Introduction
I am a Forest Carbon and Climate Change Researcher with the Government of BC and an adjunct professor at the U. Northern BC and U. Calgary. I investigate which forest management and wood product strategies are best suited to achieving the mutual goals of climate change mitigation and adaptation. Using this knowledge, I lead and collaborates on developing evidence-based policy.

Publications

Publications (64)
Article
Full-text available
Improved forest management may offer climate mitigation needed to hold warming to below 2°C. However, uncertainties persist about the effects of harvesting intensity on forest carbon sequestration, especially when considering interactions with regional climate and climate change. Here, we investigated the combined effects of harvesting intensity, c...
Article
Most wildfire studies are regional to global in scale; however, many of the values of interest and the weather are local phenomena that may give rise to large spatial variability in risk. We assessed the interaction of elevation and climate on fire weather for the Penticton Creek watershed in southwestern Canada for historic weather, and five clima...
Article
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The forest sector can help reduce atmospheric CO2 through carbon (C) sequestration and storage and wood substitution of more polluting materials. However, climate change can have an impact on the C fluxes we are trying to leverage through forestry. We calculated the difference in CO2 eq. fluxes between ecosystem-based forest management and total fo...
Article
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Afforestation is an important greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation strategy but the efficacy of commercial forestry is disputed. Here, we calculate the potential GHG mitigation of a UK national planting strategy of 30,000 ha yr ⁻¹ from 2020 to 2050, using dynamic life cycle assessment. What-if scenarios vary: conifer-broadleaf composition, harvesting, p...
Technical Report
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The movement and storage of carbon is a central focus across the natural resource sector due to the impact of carbon cycle dynamics on global climate change. While many of our activities on the land focus on above-ground forms of carbon, the largest terrestrial carbon pool is found in the soil. Soil organic carbon (SOC) makes up 85% of the terrestr...
Technical Report
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Soil organic carbon (SOC) is the largest terrestrial carbon pool, and is an important consideration in climate mitigation and adaptation efforts. Land management can cause direct gains or losses of SOC, and can also have a measurable impact on the ongoing processes that affect SOC over the long-term [1, 2, 3]. However, this impact is site-specific....
Article
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Background There are high estimates of the potential climate change mitigation opportunity of using wood products. A significant part of those estimates depends on long-lived wood products in the construction sector replacing concrete, steel, and other non-renewable goods. Often the climate change mitigation benefits of this substitution are presen...
Article
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To mitigate and adapt to climate change, forest carbon sequestration and diversity of the ecosystem must be included in forest management planning, while satisfying the demand for wood products. The future provisions of ecosystem services under six realistic management scenarios were assessed to achieve that goal. These services were carbon sequest...
Article
Previous studies have examined the economic trade-offs of climate change mitigation in forestry. However, most have not explicitly accounted for the impact of climate change on productivity or the value of carbon sequestration when considering the higher costs of adaptive planting. Here we build on previous studies from north-western Canada, using...
Conference Paper
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Consequential life cycle assessment was applied to forestry systems to evaluate the environmental balance of expanding forestry onto marginal agricultural land to supply more timber for the built environment, accounting for land use effects and product substitution. Forestry expansion to supply timber buildings could mitigate UK greenhouse gas (GHG...
Article
Full-text available
Consequential life cycle assessment was applied to forestry systems to evaluate the environmental balance of expanding forestry onto marginal agricultural land to supply more timber for the built environment, accounting for land use effects and product substitution. Forestry expansion to supply timber buildings could mitigate UK greenhouse gas (GHG...
Article
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Climate change is projected to have negative implications for forest ecosystems and their dependent communities and industries. Adaptation studies of forestry practices have focused on maintaining the provisioning of ecosystem services; however, those practices may have implications for climate change mitigation as well by increasing biological sin...
Article
Full-text available
Management of temperate forests has the potential to increase carbon sinks and mitigate climate change. However, those opportunities may be confounded by negative climate change impacts. We therefore need a better understanding of climate change alterations to temperate forest carbon dynamics before developing mitigation strategies. The purpose of...
Technical Report
Full-text available
There is a growing interest world-wide in an economy more firmly based on bioenergy and bioproducts (i.e., the bioeconomy). Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is the standard approach for evaluating environmental effects of bioeconomic activities, and therefore is a key component of product certification, market acceptance, and policy development. Given t...
Article
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Increasing the resilience of ecological and sociological systems has been proposed as an option to adapt to changing future climatic conditions. However, few studies test the applicability of those strategies to forest management. This paper uses a real forest health incident to assess the ability of forest management strategies to affect ecologica...
Article
Full-text available
Management of temperate forests has the potential to increase carbon sinks and mitigate climate change. However, those opportunities may be confounded by negative climate change impacts. We therefore need a better understanding of climate change alterations to temperate forest carbon dynamics before developing mitigation strategies. The purpose of...
Article
Full-text available
The lack of data about current bioenergy production in British Columbia severely limits stakeholder analyses of the true value and growth potential of bioenergy within the province and the forest industry's sustainability. Fifty-two facilities were surveyed to gather statistics on rates of fibre use for energy, thermal and electrical energy capacit...
Article
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In British Columbia, Canada, a recent epidemic of mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, 1902) caused widespread forest mortality. This epidemic was due in part to the changing climate, and damage from pests and diseases is expected to increase in the future. Therefore, we used a historical retrospective approach as a proxy to evalu...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Background / Purpose: We have limited understanding of how the growth of individual, co-occurring tree species will be altered by climate change, but making such projections is important both for managing forest resources and for advancing knowledge of forest behavior under global change. Here we apply an ecophysiological forest production model...
Data
British Columbia (BC) forests are estimated to have become a net carbon source in recent years due to tree death and decay caused primarily by mountain pine beetle (MPB) and related post-harvest slash burning practices. BC forest biomass has also become a major source of wood pellets, exported primarily for bioenergy to Europe, although the sustain...
Article
British Columbia (BC) forests are estimated to have become a net carbon source in recent years due to tree death and decay caused primarily by mountain pine beetle (MPB) and related post-harvest slash burning practices. BC forest biomass has also become a major source of wood pellets, exported primarily for bioenergy to Europe, although the sustain...
Article
Full-text available
Stump extraction for forest health has been carried out operationally in British Columbia (BC) for many years. Emerging bioenergy opportunities plus the anticipated need for more fibre because of reductions in timber supply may increase interest in stump harvesting, but there are numerous environmental, economic and policy barriers that must be ove...
Article
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Background The default international accounting rules estimate the carbon emissions from forest products by assuming all harvest is immediately emitted to the atmosphere. This makes it difficult to assess the greenhouse gas (GHG) consequences of different forest management or manufacturing activities that maintain the storage of carbon. The Intergo...
Article
Over the coming decades, climate change will increasingly affect forest ecosystem processes, but the future magnitude and direction of these responses is uncertain. We designed 12 scenarios combining possible changes in tree growth rates, decay rates, and area burned by wildfire with forecasts of future harvest to quantify the uncertainty of future...
Article
Full-text available
Canada's forests play an important role in the global carbon (C) cycle because of their large and dynamic C stocks. Detailed monitoring of C exchange between forests and the atmosphere and improved understanding of the processes that affect the net ecosystem exchange of C are needed to improve our understanding of the terrestrial C budget. We estim...
Article
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• It is anticipated that as climate changes, fire seasons will become longer and result in more wildfire ignitions, larger wildfires, and increased fire severity and duration. • There are ways of managing fire-prone forests to maintain and protect the carbon they store, protect people and their communities, and reduce the costs of firefighting, reh...
Article
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Spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana Clem.) is an important and recurrent disturbance throughout spruce (Picea sp.) and balsam fir (Abies balsamea L.) dominated forests of North America. Forest carbon (C) dynamics in these ecosystems are affected during insect outbreaks because millions of square kilometers of forest suffer growth loss and mort...
Article
Interest in the use of bioenergy is increasing because of the need to mitigate climate change, the increasing costs and finite supply of fossil fuels, and the declining price of lumber and paper. Sound bioenergy policies must be informed by accurate estimates of potential feedstock production, rights to the production, social values and economics....
Article
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In their Policy Forum paper “Wood energy in America” (13 March, p. [1432][1]), D. deB. Richter Jr. et al. argue cogently for deployment of advanced wood combustion (AWC) systems to meet a range of objectives, and they demonstrate the potential economic and energy values of community-based AWC in
Article
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The scientific community, forest managers, environmental organizations, carbon-offset trading systems and policy-makers require tools to account for forest carbon stocks and carbon stock changes. In this paper we describe updates to the Carbon Budget Model of the Canadian Forest Sector (CBM-CFS3) implemented over the past years. This model of carbo...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This article was submitted without an abstract, please refer to the full-text PDF file.
Article
Several studies have demonstrated that natural disturbances have a very strong impact on the carbon (C) budget of Canada's boreal forests, but how important are these impacts within the managed forest, where both natural and anthropogenic disturbance factors are at play? Is it possible to quantify the C impacts of forest management (e.g harvesting,...
Article
Full-text available
The mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) is a native insect of the pine forests of western North America, and its populations periodically erupt into large-scale outbreaks. During outbreaks, the resulting widespread tree mortality reduces forest carbon uptake and increases future emissions fr...
Article
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A large carbon sink in northern land surfaces inferred from global carbon cycle inversion models led to concerns during Kyoto Protocol negotiations that countries might be able to avoid efforts to reduce fossil fuel emissions by claiming large sinks in their managed forests. The greenhouse gas balance of Canada's managed forest is strongly affected...
Article
A large carbon sink in northern land surfaces inferred from global carbon cycle inversion models led to concerns during Kyoto Protocol negotiations that countries might be able to avoid efforts to reduce fossil fuel emissions by claiming large sinks in their managed forests. The greenhouse gas balance of Canada's managed forest is strongly affected...
Article
An established model for risk rating of Pinus contorta stands for potential mortality caused by mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) combines information on stand susceptibility and beetle pressure. Susceptibility is determined using attributes in the forest inventory data, while beetle pressure is calculated based on the size and distanc...
Article
The severity and large spatial extent of the current mountain pine beetle outbreak in western North America has prompted research into methods for surveying the location and extent of beetle impacts using remotely sensed data. New forms of remotely sensed data and methods of image analysis have emerged in recent years, which have the potential to p...
Article
Full-text available
Decision support systems to aid the management of mountain pine beetles combine characteristics of the stand and beetle infestation to estimate risk of damage. Beetle infestation information is now available in a format amenable to the operational implementation of risk. In this study, an established risk rating system was evaluated to determine th...
Chapter
Full-text available
Forest management decisions regarding the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopk. [Coleoptera: Scolytidae]) are generally driven by the location, size, and impact of the beetle population, and a variety of survey techniques are used to collect this information. The methodology used and the scale (level of detail) of the survey are deter...
Article
The goal of this project was to determine the ability to detect forest insect disturbances occurring over a 6 year period using a remote sensing change detection approach. The study area in central British Columbia, Canada, has been experiencing an epidemic outbreak of bark beetles. The actual location and number of trees attacked by mountain pine...
Article
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Vegetation fires have become an increasing problem in tropical environments as a consequence of socioeconomic pressures and subsequent land-use change. In response, fire management systems are being developed. This study set out to determine the relationships between two aspects of the fire problems in western Indonesia and Malaysia, and two compon...
Article
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Fire management systems are being developed in many tropical countries, including Indonesia and Malaysia. As part of that development, this study set out to develop a fuel classification system and map for Malaysia and western Indonesia. We developed a template of fuel characteristics from temperate fuel classification systems and gathered data fro...
Article
The Carbon Budget Model of the Canadian Forest Sector (CBM-CFS) is a forest carbon (C) accounting system that estimates C stocks and stock changes in biomass and dead organic matter pools. The model operates at four spatial scales from stand-level to national. Recent advances have improved the generalized framework for the simulation of disturbance...
Technical Report
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http://cfs.nrcan.gc.ca/publications?id=24986
Article
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Predictive vegetation mapping systems use a variety of remote sensing and other geospatial data in a mixture of empirical and biophysical models to predict vegetation characteristics. These systems are important tools for understanding and monitoring spatial patterns over the landscape. We have developed a system that partitions the geospatial data...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This technology transfer note describes three Arc/Info Macro Language (AML) scripts that GIS professionals can adapt to most forest inventory databases. The three AML scripts described are a susceptibility script, a legacy susceptibility script for use with older forest inventory datasets, and a risk script.
Technical Report
Full-text available
Forest management decisions regarding the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopk.) are generally driven by the location, size, and impact of the beetle population. Information on infestations is collected using a variety of survey techniques, with the methodology and scale (level of detail) of the survey being defined by the management...
Article
Full-text available
Surveys for mountain pine beetle are undertaken across a range of scales to provide forest managers with up-to-date information regarding the location, extent, and numbers of infested trees. Remote sensing provides new opportunities to detect and map mountain pine beetle damage to inform management and mitigation decisions. The key to using remotel...
Article
Maps of current and potential vegetation spatial patterns can be used to assess land cover changes, and aid in ecosystem management and restoration. The vegetation spatial patterns of subalpine forest species are largely controlled by variation in temperature, water and solar radiation resources. These fundamental resources were quantified across a...