Canan Cakirlar

Canan Cakirlar
University of Groningen | RUG · Groningen Institute of Archaeology (GIA)

PhD

About

85
Publications
32,464
Reads
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1,081
Citations
Additional affiliations
September 2012 - present
University of Groningen
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
January 2011 - June 2012
Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences
Position
  • PostDoc Position
January 2011 - July 2012
Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (85)
Article
Schipluiden (3630-3380 cal BC), the earliest known year-round settlement in the Rhine-Meuse Delta in the Netherlands, is a key site for addressing the nature of Neolithic subsistence in the wetlands of northwestern Europe. A preliminary zooarchaeological study suggested that cattle husbandry was a major activity at Schipluiden. In contrast, stable...
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This paper focuses on the functional analysis of Swifterbant pottery (c. 5000-3800 cal BC) in the Lower Rhine-Meuse area (the Netherlands). It examines pottery use across the transition to agriculture and aims to assess temporal changes in human-animal relations during the 5th millennium BC in the Lower Rhine-Meuse area through lipid residue analys...
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Cattle were of great importance for the Neolithic farmers of southeastern Europe, in particular as farming expanded towards the well-watered regions of Džuljunica (ca. 6200–5500 cal. BCE), one of the earliest known Neolithic settlements in northeastern Bulgaria. The clear stratigraphy and the substantial Bos assemblage from Džuljunica Provided us w...
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The Middle and Late Bronze Ages of western Anatolia (modern Turkey) remains poorly understood in comparison with its Mycenaean and Hittite neighbours, especially in agricultural economies and land use. Kaymakçı is the largest Middle and Late Bronze Age citadel excavated to date in western Anatolia and new archaeobotanical and zooarchaeological data...
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Cattle traction was a technological innovation that made a significant impact on production, individual and household wealth, and social organisation. Despite ongoing debates regarding the origins and extent of the harnessing of cattle power among early agropastoral societies, only a few studies have attempted at addressing this matter systematical...
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Suids (Sus sp.) played a crucial role in the transition to farming in northern Europe and, like in many regions, in the Netherlands pig husbandry became an important subsistence activity at Neolithic sites. Yet little is known about wild boar palaeoecology and hunting in the Late Mesolithic Netherlands with which to contextualize this transition. T...
Article
Scholars have been arguing about the nature and scale of Greco-Roman economy in mainland Greece for over fifty years. In this study we investigate the faunal assemblages of Magoula Plataniotiki and New Halos, two neighbouring Classical and Hellenistic towns in Almiros (Thessaly, Greece) to scrutinize how the animal economy functioned in central Gre...
Article
One hundred years of zooarchaeology in Groningen. In 1920, Albert Egges van Giffen founded the Biologisch-Archaeologisch Instituut. Even back in 1920, zooarchaeology was a main component of the institute’s research focus and van Giffen started a zooarchaeological reference collection. The zooarchaeology collection gradually expanded, and zooarchaeo...
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Humans have been exploiting marine resources along the Levantine coast for millennia. Advances in biomolecular archaeology present novel opportunities to understand the exploitation of these taxa in antiquity. We discuss the potential insights generated by applying collagen peptide fingerprinting, ancient DNA analysis, and stable isotope analysis t...
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Reindeer (Rangifer tarandus) have shaped the cultures and provided livelihood to peoples of the Northern Hemisphere for thousands of years. They are still the socio‐economic cornerstone of many northern cultures. Insight into reindeer mortality patterns is important for understanding past human‐reindeer interactions and reindeer population fluctuat...
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The Epipalaeolithic and Mesolithic periods of Turkey are poorly understood. The discovery of two sites (Kocaman and Kayadibi) in the Karaburun Peninsula in coastal western Turkey opens a whole new window into our understanding of these periods in Turkey and beyond by providing the first solid evidence for pre-Neolithic foragers. This article presen...
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This paper explores pig husbandry across the Aegean and Anatolia based on zooarchaeological data and ancient texts. The western Anatolian citadel of Kaymakçı is the departure point for discussion, as it sits in the Mycenaean-Hittite interaction zone and provides a uniquely large assemblage of pig bones. NISP, mortality, and biometric data from 38 a...
Chapter
The two‑humped camel, which the Greeks and Romans called the Bactrian camel, is a mystery, when it comes to its zooarchaeological record. The archaeological evidence for its pre‑domestication biogeography, domestication centre, diffusion, and finally its hybridization with the dromedary is extremely scarce. This situation is in great contrast with...
Article
More than fifty years ago, Anneke T. Clason published the first English-language archaeozoological study on Dutch faunal assemblages. Inspired by the anniversary of this landmark publication, this paper presents a status overview of Dutch archaeozoology organized in twelve themes (e.g. rituals, Mesolithic-Neolithic transition, medieval period). The...
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Accessibility to zooarchaeological reference materials is a key hurdle when determining species classification, particularly in cases where the differences between two species (e.g. sheep and goat) are nuanced. Bonify is a pilot platform allowing the virtual comparison between 3D virtual animal bone models and zooarchaeological specimens. Two techn...
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Archaeological evidence indicates that pig domestication had begun by ∼10,500 y before the present (BP) in the Near East, and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) suggests that pigs arrived in Europe alongside farmers ∼8,500 y BP. A few thousand years after the introduction of Near Eastern pigs into Europe, however, their characteristic mtDNA signature disapp...
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Full-text available
Archaeological evidence indicates that pig domestication had begun by ∼10,500 y before the present (BP) in the Near East, and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) suggests that pigs arrived in Europe alongside farmers ∼8,500 y BP. A few thousand years after the introduction of Near Eastern pigs into Europe, however, their characteristic mtDNA signature disapp...
Article
Full-text available
Archaeological evidence indicates that pig domestication had begun by ∼10,500 y before the present (BP) in the Near East, and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) suggests that pigs arrived in Europe alongside farmers ∼8,500 y BP. A few thousand years after the introduction of Near Eastern pigs into Europe, however, their characteristic mtDNA signature disapp...
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Full-text available
The site of Ulucak is pivotal in exploring the Neolithic of the eastern Aegean and western Anatolia. It has an impressivestratigraphic sequence stretching from the first half of the seventh millennium BC to the first half of the sixth millennium BC.Recent zooarchaeological analyses have provided insight into the importance of animal husbandry pract...
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Southern Anatolia is a highly significant area within the Mediterranean, particularly in terms of understanding how agriculture moved into Europe from neighbouring regions. This study uses pollen, palaeoclimate and archaeological evidence to investigate the relationships between demography and vegetation change, and to explore how the development o...
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The Bulgarian site Džuljunica-Smărdeš, dating to 6205-5529 cal. BC, is one of the oldest Neolithic sites in Europe. Both domestic cattle and caprines are present in the zooarchaeological assemblage, but Sus, in contrast, is extremely rare. It is not known if the earliest Neolithic people in Europe did rear domestic pigs, practised some form of pig...
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Full-text available
The Bulgarian site Džuljunica-Smărdeš, dating to 6205-5529 cal. BC, is one of the oldest Neolithic sites in Europe. Both domestic cattle and caprines are present in the zooarchaeological assemblage, but Sus, in contrast, is extremely rare. It is not known if the earliest Neolithic people in Europe did rear domestic pigs, practised some form of pig...
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Full-text available
THIS ARTICLE IS AVAILABLE VIA AJA OPEN ACCESS AT https://www.ajaonline.org/sites/default/files/1224_Roosevelt_0.pdf WITH AN ONLINE SUPPLEMENTAL IMAGE GALLERY AT https://www.ajaonline.org/node/3774. Current understandings of the archaeology of second-millennium B.C.E. central western Anatolia are enriched by ongoing research at Kaymakçı, located in...
Article
Michael J. Allen, ed. Molluscs in Archaeology: Methods, Approaches and Applications (Studying Scientific Archaeology 3. Oxford: Oxbow Books, 2017, 448pp., 107 illustr., 36 in colour, hbk, ISBN: 978-1-785-70608-0) - Volume 21 Issue 3 - Canan Çakirlar
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Full-text available
Current genetic data are equivocal as to whether goat domestication occurred multiple times or was a singular process. We generated genomic data from 83 ancient goats (51 with genome-wide coverage) from Paleolithic to Medieval contexts throughout the Near East. Our findings demonstrate that multiple divergent ancient wild goat sources were domestic...
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Digital literacy has been cited as one of the primary challenges to ensuring data reuse and increasing the value placed on open science. Incorporating published data into classrooms and training is at the core of tackling this issue. This article presents case studies in teaching with different published data platforms, in three different countries...
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The ‘Karaburun Archaeological Survey’ project aims to illuminate the lifeways of Late Pleistocene and Early Holocene foragers in western Anatolia. A recently discovered, lithic-rich site on the Karaburun Peninsula offers new insights into a currently undocumented period of western Anatolian prehistory.
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This paper presents biometric data from a collection of 488 dogs skulls originating from 58 (archaeological) sites in the northern Netherlands dating from the Iron Age to the Medieval Period. The crania were originally collected and documented in the early 20th century by Prof. Albert Egges van Giffen, one of the pioneers of Dutch archaeology and a...
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Roman Gordion, on the Anatolian plateau, is the only excavated rural military settlement in a pacified territory in the Roman East, providing a unique opportunity to investigate the agricultural economy of a permanent Roman garrison. We present combined results of archaeobotanical and zooarchaeological analyses, assessing several hypotheses regardi...
Article
Sheep and goat herding, the basis of pastoralism in the Near East, has been integral to the social organisation, diet, economy, religion and environment of the region since the beginnings of animal domestication. Interestingly, this omnipresent factor of life in the Near East has not been a popular topic of enquiry in its own right amongst archaeol...
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Despite ongoing fieldwork focusing on the Palaeolithic and Mesolithic periods of the Aegean, the eastern part of this region, especially western Turkey, remains almost entirely unexplored in terms of early prehistory. There is virtually no evidence from this area that can contribute to broader research themes such as the dispersal of early hominins...
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The craftsmanship of the ivory objects in Late Bronze Age and Iron Age Eastern Mediterranean leave no doubt as to their intention to impress. Elephant teeth are an important raw material for the manufacture of these objects. Zooarchaeological research shows that cranial, dental, and postcranial remains of Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) are nearl...
Article
Western Anatolia, including the eastern Aegean region and the lowlands around the Marmara Sea, is crucial to understand the pivotal transformations of early farmers in the eastern Mediterranean. Most pre-Bronze Age research in western Turkey has focused on understanding the region's role in the dispersal of domesticated plants and animals, largely...
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Cattle domestication started in the 9(th) millennium BC in Southwest Asia. Domesticated cattle were then introduced into Europe during the Neolithic transition. However, the scarcity of palaeogenetic data from the first European domesticated cattle still inhibits the accurate reconstruction of their early demography. In this study, mitochondrial DN...
Data
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Mammals This report presents summary information about the mammals in the Groningen University, Institute of Archaeology Zooarchaeological Research and Teaching Collections. It includes an overview of the amount and types of specimens, information on breeds, exotic and extinct species, geographic origin, and statistics about the IUCN status of the...
Data
Full-text available
The zooarchaeological reference collection of the Groningen Institute of Archaeology (University of Groningen, Netherlands): The birds Overview A total of 2151 bird specimens are present in the reference collection at the Groninger Institute of Archaeology (GIA) comprising at least 428 different species of birds from 85 different family groups
Technical Report
Full-text available
The zooarchaeological reference collection of the Groningen Institute of Archaeology (University of Groningen, Netherlands): The Fish Overview A total of 732 fish specimens are present in the reference collection at the Groningen Institute of Archaeology (GIA) comprising at least 118 different species of fish from 53 different families.
Technical Report
Full-text available
Overview of the reptiles and amphibians present in the zooarchaeological reference collection of the Groningen Institute for Archaeology.
Article
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Investigations of a balk in the centre of the prehistoric settlement of D∫uljunica-SmərdeΠ comprised a sequence of archaeological deposits from the very onset of Neolithisation in Southeastern Europe throughout the end of the Early Neolithic. The arrival of Neolithic lifeways in the region coincides with the end of a period for which palaeoclimate...
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Hybrid camels, intentional crosses between dromedaries and bactrian camels, are prized for their robustness and endurance. They were the prime vehicles of short and long distance caravan trade in a large area between Greece and Mongolia until the whole-scale introduction of motorized transport. This paper proposes a model for the zooarchaeological...
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The effects of foreign military interventions on production and distribution systems in occupied lands are commonly assessed through the study of textual sources and pottery typologies in Bronze Age archaeology and historiography. In this article, we explore the zooarchaeological record of the recently uncovered Late Bronze IIA deposits at Alalakh...
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This study presents the results of a major data integration project bringing together primary archaeozoological data for over 200,000 faunal specimens excavated from seventeen sites in Turkey spanning the Epipaleolithic through Chalcolithic periods, c. 18,000-4,000 cal BC, in order to document the initial westward spread of domestic livestock acros...