Camille Bonneaud

Camille Bonneaud
University of Exeter | UoE · Department of Biosciences

PhD

About

148
Publications
11,704
Reads
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3,029
Citations
Additional affiliations
September 2012 - August 2015
University of Exeter
Position
  • Research lecturer
September 2009 - August 2012
Station d’Ecologie Expérimentale à Moulis
Position
  • Marie Curie research fellow
September 2006 - July 2009
Harvard University
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (148)
Article
Protective immunity is expected to evolve when the costs of mounting an immune response are less than those of harbouring pathogens. Estimating the costs of immunity vs. pathogenesis in natural systems is challenging, however, because they are typically closely linked. Here we attempt to disentangle the relative cost of each using experimental infe...
Article
Full-text available
Knowledge of the processes favouring the establishment of exotic parasites is poor. Herein, we test the characteristics of successful exotic parasites that have co-established in the remote island archipelago of New Zealand, due to the introduction of numerous avian host species. Our results show that avian malaria parasites (AM; parasites of the g...
Article
Innate immunity is expected to play a primary role in conferring resistance to novel infectious diseases, but few studies have attempted to examine its role in the evolution of resistance to emerging pathogens in wild vertebrate populations. Here, we used experimental infections and cDNA microarrays to examine whether changes in the innate and/or a...
Article
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Measureable rates of genome evolution are well documented in human pathogens but are less well understood in bacterial pathogens in the wild, particularly during and after host switches. Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) is a pathogenic bacterium that has evolved predominantly in poultry and recently jumped to wild house finches (Carpodacus mexicanus),...
Article
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Wild organisms are under increasing pressure to adapt rapidly to environmental changes. Predicting the impact of these changes on natural populations requires an understanding of the speed with which adaptive phenotypes can arise and spread, as well as of the underlying mechanisms. However, our understanding of these parameters is poor in natural p...
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Abstract Endemic island species face unprecedented threats, with many populations in decline or at risk of extinction. One important threat is the introduction of novel and potentially devastating diseases, made more pressing due to accelerating global connectivity, urban development, and climatic changes. In the Galápagos archipelago two important...
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Agroforest mosaics represent one of the most extensive human-impacted terrestrial systems worldwide and play an increasingly critical role in wildlife conservation. In such dynamic shared landscapes, coexistence can be compromised if people view wildlife as a source of infectious disease. A cross-disciplinary One Health knowledge base can help to i...
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Humans are considered as the main host for Mycobacterium leprae1, the aetiological agent of leprosy, but spillover has occurred to other mammals that are now maintenance hosts, such as nine-banded armadillos and red squirrels2,3. Although naturally acquired leprosy has also been described in captive nonhuman primates4–7, the exact origins of infect...
Chapter
The significance of studying birds and their pathogens goes far beyond the applied conservation or epidemiological implications of their interactions. Evidence suggests that avian host–pathogen systems can be used to test fundamental theoretical predictions about adaptive evolution and coevolution in natural populations. This chapter highlights rec...
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Quantifying variation in the ability to fight infection among free-living hosts is challenging and often constrained to one or a few measures of immune activity. While such measures are typically taken to reflect host resistance, they can also be shaped by pathogen effects, for example, if more virulent strains trigger more robust immune responses....
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Background Variation in locomotor capacity among animals often reflects adaptations to different environments. Despite evidence that physical performance is heritable, the molecular basis of locomotor performance and performance trade-offs remains poorly understood. In this study we identify the genes, signaling pathways, and regulatory processes p...
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Darwin's finches are an iconic example of adaptive radiation and evolution under natural selection. Comparative genetic studies using embryos of Darwin's finches have shed light on the possible evolutionary processes underlying the speciation of this clade. Molecular identification of the sex of embryonic samples is important for such studies, wher...
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As a major physiological mechanism involved in cellular renewal and repair, immune function is vital to the body's capacity to support tissue maintenance and organismal survival. Because immune defenses can be energetically expensive, the activities of metabolically active organs, such as the liver, are predicted to increase during infection by mos...
Preprint
Full-text available
Humans are considered the main host for Mycobacterium leprae , the aetiologic agent of leprosy, but spill-over to other mammals such as nine-banded armadillos and red squirrels occurs. Although naturally acquired leprosy has also been described in captive nonhuman primates, the exact origins of infection remain unclear. Here, we report on leprosy-l...
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The virulence‐transmission trade‐off hypothesis has provided a dominant theoretical basis for predicting pathogen virulence evolution, but empirical tests are rare, particularly at pathogen emergence. The central prediction of this hypothesis is that pathogen fitness is maximized at intermediate virulence due to a trade‐off between infection durati...
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Evolutionary biology is key to potentially predicting virulence and transmission after a pathogen jumps into a new host species. This knowledge would be valuable for designing public health strategies.
Preprint
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Darwin’s finches, endemic to the Galapagos and Cocos islands, are an iconic example of adaptive radiation and evolution under natural selection. Comparative genetic studies using embryos of Darwin’s finches have shed light on the possible evolutionary processes underlying the speciation of this clade. Molecular identification of the sex of embryoni...
Article
The energetic costs of body maintenance can have a profound influence on the energy that an individual can allocate to other functions such as growth, locomotion, or reproduction. Therefore, resting metabolism can ultimately affect an individual's survival or reproductive success, especially when food is limited. Although males and females often di...
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Understanding the ecology and evolution of parasites is contingent on identifying the selection pressures they face across their infection landscape. Such a task is made challenging by the fact that these pressures will likely vary across time and space, as a result of seasonal and geographical differences in host susceptibility or transmission opp...
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Novel disease emergence is often associated with changes in pathogen traits that enable pathogen colonisation, persistence and transmission in the novel host environment. While understanding the mechanisms underlying disease emergence is likely to have critical implications for preventing infectious outbreaks, such knowledge is often based on studi...
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Our understanding of the ecological and evolutionary context of novel infections is largely based on viral diseases, even though bacterial pathogens may display key differences in the processes underlying their emergence. For instance, host-shift speciation, in which the jump of a pathogen into a novel host species is followed by the specialization...
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Host resistance through immune clearance is predicted to favor pathogens that are able to transmit faster and are hence more virulent. Increasing pathogen virulence is, in turn, typically assumed to be mediated by increasing replication rates. However, experiments designed to test how pathogen virulence and replication rates evolve in response to i...
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Understanding how hosts minimize the cost of emerging infections has fundamental implications for epidemiological dynamics and the evolution of pathogen virulence. Despite this, few experimental studies in natural populations have tested whether, in response to disease emergence, hosts evolve resistance, which reduces pathogen load through immune a...
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Pathogens are potent selective forces that can reduce the fitness of their hosts. While studies of the short-term energetic costs of infections are accumulating, the long-term costs have only just started to be investigated. Such delayed costs may, at least in part, be mediated by telomere erosion. This hypothesis is supported by experimental inves...
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Climate change is in part responsible for the 70% decline in amphibian species numbers worldwide. Although temperature is expected to impact whole-organism performance in ectotherms, reversible thermal acclimation has been suggested as a mechanism that may buffer responses to abrupt temperature changes. Here, we test for an effect of acclimation on...
Preprint
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Understanding how hosts minimise the cost of emerging infections has fundamental implications for epidemiological dynamics and the evolution of pathogen virulence. Despite this, few experimental studies conducted in natural populations have explicitly tested whether hosts evolve resistance, which prevents infections or reduces pathogen load through...
Article
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Host-pathogen coevolution is assumed to play a key role in eco-evolutionary processes, including epidemiological dynamics and the evolution of sexual reproduction [1-4]. Despite this, direct evidence for host-pathogen coevolution is exceptional [5-7], particularly in vertebrate hosts. Indeed, although vertebrate hosts have been shown to evolve in r...
Article
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Emergent infectious diseases can have a devastating impact on host populations. The high selective pressures on both the hosts and the pathogens frequently lead to rapid adaptations not only in pathogen virulence but also host resistance following an initial outbreak. However, it is often unclear whether hosts will evolve to avoid infection‐associa...
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In 1994, an endemic poultry pathogen, Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG), was identified as the causative agent of a novel disease in house finches ( Haemorhous mexicanus). After an initial outbreak in Maryland, MG spread rapidly throughout eastern North American populations of house finches. Subsequently, MG spread slowly through the northern interior...
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While direct contact may sometimes be sufficient to allow a pathogen to jump into a new host species, in other cases fortuitously adaptive mutations that arise in the original donor host are also necessary. Viruses have been the focus of most host shift studies, so less is known about the importance of ecological versus evolutionary processes to su...
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Behavioural plasticity is important for survival and to adapt to a dynamic environment. However, it is known that many animals exhibit fixed behavioural responses termed behavioural syndromes. That said, even when exhibiting such fixed behavioural responses, animals still show variability in their behaviour. We here evaluate the variability in expl...
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Synopsis: Parasites can represent formidable selection pressures for hosts, but the cost of infection is sometimes difficult to demonstrate in natural populations. While parasite exploitation strategies may, in some instances, actually inflict low costs on their hosts, the response of hosts to infection is also likely to determine whether or not t...
Preprint
Vertebrate endurance capacity is a phenotype with considerable genetic heterogeneity. RNA-Seq technologies are an ideal tool to investigate the involved genes and processes, but several challenges exist when the phenotype of interest has a complex genetic background. Difficulties manifest at the level of results interpretation because commonly used...
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Energy-based trade-offs occur when investment in one fitness-related trait diverts energy away from other traits. The extent to which such trade-offs are shaped by limits on the rate of conversion of energy ingested in food (e.g. carbohydrates) into chemical energy (ATP) by oxidative metabolism rather than by the amount of food ingested in the firs...
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Background Sequencing technologies provide a wealth of details in terms of genes, expression, splice variants, polymorphisms, and other features. A standard for sequencing analysis pipelines is to put genomic or transcriptomic features into a context of known functional information, but the relationships between ontology terms are often ignored. Fo...
Article
While developmental plasticity has been shown to contribute to sexual size dimorphism (SSD) in laboratory studies, its role in shaping SSD variation in wild vertebrate populations is unclear. Here we use a field study and a laboratory experiment to show that resource availability influences the degree of SSD among insular populations of Anolis sagr...
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Ornamentation is hypothesized to signal the capacity of an individual to cope with environmental challenges. At the molecular level, organisms respond to their environments largely by altering gene transcription, but the transcriptional responses linking ornamentation and disease resistance are virtually unstudied. In the house finch (Haemorhous me...
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The two sexes of a species often differ in many ways. How sexes differ depends on the selective context, with females often investing more in reproductive output and males in territory defense and resource acquisition. This also implies that behavioral strategies may differ between the two sexes allowing them to optimize their fitness in a given ec...
Article
Over the past several decades, outbreaks of emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) in wild birds have attracted worldwide media attention, either because of their extreme virulence or because of alarming spillovers into agricultural animals or humans. The pathogens involved have been found to infect a variety of bird hosts ranging from relatively few...
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Frogs are characterized by a morphology that has been suggested to be related to their unique jumping specialization. Yet, the functional demands associated with jumping and swimming may not be that different as suggested by studies with semi-aquatic frogs. Here, we explore whether features previously identified as indicative of good burst swimming...
Article
Exploration behaviour is a complex trait that may have strong implications for the fitness of individuals and the persistence of populations. Understanding the different exploration strategies is necessary to understand how animals may adapt to changes in their environment including human-induced habitat fragmentation. Behavioural syndromes are oft...
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The importance of studying individual variation in locomotor performance has long been recognized as it may determine the ability of an organism to escape from predators, catch prey or disperse. In ectotherms, locomotor performance is highly influenced by ambient temperature (T a), yet several studies have showed that individual differences are usu...
Article
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Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), the causative agent of chytridiomycosis, is decimating amphibians worldwide. Unsurprisingly, the majority of studies have therefore concentrated on documenting morbidity and mortality of susceptible species and projecting population consequences as a consequence of this emerging infectious disease. Currently, th...
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Amphibians are ideal taxa with which to investigate the effects of climate change on physiology, dispersal capacity and distributional ranges as their physiological performance and fitness is highly dependent on temperature. Moreover, amphibians are among the most endangered vertebrate taxa. Here we use the tropical clawed frog, Xenopus tropicalis,...
Article
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Trade-offs are thought to impose barriers to phenotypic diversification and may limit the evolutionary responses of organisms to environmental changes. In particular, locomotor trade-offs between endurance or maximal exertion capacity and burst performance capacity have been observed in some species and may constrain the ability of organisms to dis...
Data
Dimorphisms between the sexes are common in vertebrates and may reflect the divergent selective pressures operating on each sex. For example, in species where males do not show territory defense or pronounced male–male combat, females are typically larger than males as fecundity selection will favor large female body size. This is often the case in...
Data
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Illustration of the recursive method used to assign segments of the genome to phylogenetically concordant blocks. At the initialization of the algorithm the phylogenetically informative SNPs in the genome (x's in the diagram) are used to determine continuous segments that are in agreement with all possible trees. Sections of a genome in agreement w...
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Estimates of genetic diversity based on the LS-MSA. (PDF)
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Counts of unique and total (due to duplication) CRISPR spacers from each strain. (PDF)
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Inference of mutation rate, recombination, times to common ancestry, and population dynamics. (PDF)
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CRISPR Analysis (PDF)
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