Camila Concepcion Alday Mamani

Camila Concepcion Alday Mamani
University of Cambridge | Cam · Department of Archaeology and Anthropology

Doctor of Philosophy
Archaeologist - all things cotton and textile fibres among hunter-gatherers in South America

About

13
Publications
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19
Citations
Citations since 2017
11 Research Items
14 Citations
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Introduction
I investigate the use of plants for textiles -all things cordages, baskets, containers & textiles - in hunter-gatherer societies of South America's west coast (12,000 -3,700 BP). My research interests include a) fibre crops & wild gathered plant-fibre; b) weaving technologies; c) Hunter-gatherers of coastal environments & d) social complexity in early H-G groups Also, I am interested in the theory of Dance, embodiment & choreographic notation applied to weaving chaine operatoire and landscapes

Publications

Publications (13)
Article
Full-text available
Resumen. Se presentan los resultados de prospeccio-nes sistemáticas realizadas en la costa y cursos bajos de la quebrada de Vítor y el valle de Camarones. Estos datos, sumados a los ya conocidos de la costa de Arica y los valles de Lluta y Azapa, demuestran que la pintu-ra no fue una técnica común para la realización de arte rupestre en estos secto...
Article
Full-text available
This work proposes plant fiber technology as a pivotal element for both social and technological decisions made by early Hunter-Gatherer and Fisher groups (HGF) from Arica, particularly in the context of technological procedures involved in the manufacturing of plantbased artefacts along the north coast of Chile during ca.10000-3700 BP. To support...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The Egg and the Sperm by Emily Martin (1991) – an essay on misogynist narratives in Science – elucidates how scientific researches are not neutral endeavors, and Archaeology is no exception. Nevertheless, since gender studies and feminist theory arrived in our discipline, females and other “marginalized” voices have provided a new understanding o...
Article
Full-text available
We present stable isotope and osteological data from human remains at Paloma, Chilca I, La Yerba III, and Morro I that offer new evidence for diet, lifestyle, and habitual mobility in the first villages that proliferated along the arid Pacific coast of South America (ca. 6000 cal BP). The data not only reaffirm the dietary primacy of marine protein...
Chapter
This paper investigates plant fibre production on the south coast of Peru by studying plant fibre remains using archaeobotanical and structural analytical techniques. The archaeobotanical method refers to the identification of bast fibres using microscopic analysis of plant tissues. This study uses a reference collection of modern plants to complem...
Book
Full-text available
Diversity in Archaeology is the result of the fourth Cambridge Annual Student Archaeology Conference (CASA 4), held virtually from January 14–17, 2021. CASA developed out of the Annual Student Archaeology Conference, first held in 2013, which was formed by students at Cambridge, Oxford, Durham and York. In 2017, Cambridge became the home of the con...
Thesis
Full-text available
This research investigates fibre technologies among the people of the coastal Andean Preceramic Period (10,000 – 3,500 BP) by studying the technological production process of bast fibre artefacts from five Preceramic archaeological sites in Peru and Chile. The raw materials, technological processes and manufacturing techniques were identified throu...
Article
Full-text available
Despite the importance of deserts in many societies and although deserts cover almost twenty per cent of the world, few efforts have been made to conduct a cross-cultural analysis of how humans have adapted to these arid climes. Inspired by the seminal work, Desert Peoples: Archaeological Perspectives (Veth et al. 2005), our volume aims to broaden...
Book
Full-text available
Despite the importance of deserts in many societies and although deserts cover almost twenty per cent of the world, few efforts have been made to conduct a cross-cultural analysis of how humans have adapted to these arid climes. Inspired by the seminal work, Desert Peoples: Archaeological perspectives (Veth et al. 2005), our volume aims to broaden...
Research
Full-text available
Although deserts cover more than twenty per cent of the world, few efforts have been made to conduct a cross-cultural analysis of how humans have adapted to these arid climes. Inspired by the seminal work, Desert Peoples: Archaeological Perspectives (2005) by P. Veth et al., this volume aims to broaden current case studies beyond the scope of hunte...
Book
Full-text available
La información fue recolectada durante los años 2010 y 2014 tras varias jornadas de campo, en las que serecorrió a pie una distancia lineal de 40 km. Para ejecutar las labores de campo, y en paralelo, poder presentar la información disponible en este catastro, se contó con el fnanciamiento del fondo concursable “FONDART Regional - Conservación y Di...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
The Cambridge Annual Student Archaeology (CASA) is a student-run conference, and the theme this year is ‘Diversity in Archaeology’. The conference has seven sessions running this year, led by researchers from a diverse range of institutions from across Europe, and there will be a panel session by leading archaeologists to close the conference. The session themes are as follows: 1. Beating Androcentric Narratives: Women’s Voices in Archaeological Discourse 2. Race and Ethnicity Across Time 3. Echoes from Beyond: Diversity in the Archaeology of Death 4. Archaeology of ‘Scapes’: Diversity in Environment and Perspective 5. The 3Ds: Diversity, Dissemination and Disclosure of Heritage 6. Archaeological Science: Using Diversified Science Methods in Archaeology 7. Interpreting the Past Through Others’ Eyes: Critically Approaching Ethnographic Analogies Paper submissions are welcomed from all individuals, at any stage of their research, to present in an open and friendly environment. It is also a perfect opportunity for first-time presenters to gain invaluable experience in discussing their research within a supportive peer network. This year’s CASA will be held online, with papers being given live or pre-recorded on Zoom with discussion following each session. We also will have a Slack channel set-up for further discussion, networking, and sharing of research. Excellent student prizes are on offer for the best presentations. Where is the conference? Virtual conference (on Zoom) When? 14-17 January 2021 Paper submission deadline? 15 November 2020 How can I submit my abstract proposal? Please fill in the linked form to submit your abstract https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfLTDz7oO35KGN0sVZ2PRFAbToRBZr498gow8U2xhue0lubuA/viewform Is there a conference fee? There is NO FEE for this year's conference. More information? Please feel free to contact us via our Facebook or Twitter (@CASAconferences), or email casa@arch.cam.ac.uk if you have any further questions or queries. You can also visit our website here: https://casa2752.wixsite.com/casa We hope to see you in January!