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Calvin G Thigpen

Calvin G Thigpen
Lime · Government Relations

PhD in Transportation Technology and Policy

About

41
Publications
10,130
Reads
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372
Citations
Introduction
Calvin G Thigpen works at the School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning at Arizona State University. Calvin conducts research in Urban Planning, Quantitative Social Research, and Behavioral Science. His most recent publication is 'Repurposing the paving: The case of surplus residential parking in Davis, CA.'
Additional affiliations
June 2012 - December 2016
University of California, Davis
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (41)
Article
Given the potential benefits of bicycling to the environment, the economy, and public health, many U.S. cities have set ambitious goals for increasing the bicycle share of commute trips. The Transtheoretical Model of Behavior Change, which seeks to describe how positive and permanent change can be fostered in individuals, may shed light on how citi...
Article
Full-text available
Many cities and states rely on aggregate seal coats (chip seals) to main- tain roads. Chip seals are economical as a surface for lower-volume roads or for preservation treatments on asphalt roads, and the technol- ogy for increasing the life span of chip seals is continually improving. Chip seals often have higher macrotexture than do asphalt or co...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The UC Davis Campus Travel Survey is a joint effort by the Transportation & Parking Services (TAPS) and the Sustainable Transportation Center, part of the Institute of Transportation Studies at UC Davis. Since 2007 the survey has been administered each fall by a graduate student at the Institute of Transportation Studies. The main purpose of the su...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This study explores bicyclist behavior in San Francisco using data collected before and after major bike infrastructure investments. From early 2011 to December 2013, investments of $3.3 million correlated with a 14% increase in counts of bicyclists, part of a 96% increase in bicyclist counts from 2006 to 2013 (San Francisco Municipal Transportatio...
Article
Human culture is widely believed to undergo evolution, via mechanisms rooted in the nature of human cognition. A number of theories predict the kinds of human learning strategies, as well as the population dynamics that result from their action. There is little work, however, that quantitatively examines the evidence for these strategies and result...
Article
In this work, we explored an upstream approach to improving news coverage of crashes: improving the press releases written by police. We developed a training program to share best practices and piloted it with 45 officers in New Jersey. We employed an exploratory mixed-methods approach, including a post-training questionnaire and extensive discussi...
Article
We surveyed transportation students and the U.S. public to explore consensus and divergence in policy preferences. We find considerable agreement among planning students, which may be a strength—it is easier to pursue shared goals—or a weakness—too much consensus can lead to echo chambers and disconnection. Engineering students and the public share...
Article
Full-text available
Accessory dwelling units (ADUs) are increasingly touted as part of the solution to the intransigent housing shortages facing many metropolitan areas across the United States. But numerous barriers to ADU development persist, including opposition by neighboring households. One persistent question is whether ADU residents would overwhelm on-street pa...
Preprint
Shared scooter programs often generate complaints about improper parking as a hazard to pedestrians and as unappealing clutter on sidewalks, yet previous research has found relatively low rates of misparking. What do people think constitutes misparking, and how much misparking do they think occurs? Can interventions further reduce misparking? We co...
Article
Full-text available
Can information increase public support for transportation reform? To understand the associations between knowledge, policy preferences, and information campaigns, we conducted a survey experiment of 597 U.S. adults, including an initial survey and a six-month follow-up. We focus on transportation policies that have high support for the status quo...
Article
Full-text available
Does what the public says they want in terms of transport policy depend on how we ask? In other words, are transportation policy preferences subject to framing effects? We surveyed 600 adults in the United States and asked them two questions about the goals of transportation. We find large framing effects (~34 percentage points) that were remarkabl...
Article
Shared scooter programs often generate complaints about improper parking as a hazard to pedestrians and as unappealing clutter on sidewalks. But what are actual rates of misparking, and do public perceptions match reality? We surveyed the general public in Auckland, New Zealand and Washington DC, USA, and polled transportation professionals at four...
Article
Full-text available
Problem, research strategy, and findings Support for transportation policies and investments is increasingly shaped by partisan ideals. Less well documented is the role of partisanship relative to potential mediating factors like transportation-related values, beliefs about the possibility of change, self-interest, and knowledge. We surveyed a repr...
Article
The decline in driver’s licensure among teenagers in the U.S. in recent decades has led some observers to speculate that the newest generation of adults will be less car dependent than those that preceded them. Previous studies have identified a variety factors that may explain the decline, including graduated licensing policies and economic condit...
Article
Full-text available
Previous research has demonstrated the relevance of life events to explain changes in travel behavior. Less clear is the moderating role played by life stages on the relationship between life events and travel behavior. Our goal in this study is to explore how the influence of life events on travel behavior differs by life stage. We use data from a...
Article
Full-text available
Policymakers, the media, and the public often view e-scooters as sidewalk clutter. While research suggests that concerns about misparked scooters are overblown, understanding why travelers mispark could inform interventions to increase parking compliance. We surveyed 391 international scooter users and find that few (9%) reported ever misparking, w...
Article
Many North American cities are building bicycling infrastructure. Lively discussions on social media, where people passionately support or reject bicycling infrastructure projects, provide a unique data set on attitudes towards bicycling infrastructure. Our goal is to analyse social media posts in Edmonton and Victoria, Canada as new bike infrastru...
Article
Full-text available
Many cities are grappling with how to regulate new shared mobility modes, including dockless e-scooters and bikes (i.e., “micromobility”). Transportation planners in these cities are particularly concerned about micromobility parking regulations, which have implications for the safety and mobility of riders and the general public. In this research,...
Article
Full-text available
Traffic crashes are one of the leading causes of preventable death in the United States. Nearly 20% of these roadway fatalities are people who were hit and killed while walking or bicycling. Pedestrian deaths increased by 46% between 2009 and 2016. Despite these troubling statistics, there has not been a sustained and widespread public call to acti...
Article
Bicyclist categorizations have been developed to sort individuals into distinct groups based on shared traits, which can help researchers and practitioners understand complex patterns of bicycling behavior. Previous categorizations have focused on bicycle facility comfort, seasonal patterns of use, and behaviors and attitudes, but not on readiness...
Article
Full-text available
The World Health Organization characterizes traffic deaths as a preventable health epidemic. Despite the scale of the problem, this issue has not led to a concerted call to action. Why not? The field of media studies offers potential insight. Not only does media coverage help determine which issues merit attention, coverage also shapes how issues a...
Article
Efforts to encourage bicycling to school can achieve numerous societal benefits, including improved childhood health, reduced traffic congestion, and even long-term effects such as increased bicycling skill and attitudes. Most of the literature on children bicycling to school focuses on the influence of infrastructure interventions, yet relatively...
Article
Full-text available
Background Urban form interventions can result in positive and negative impacts on physical activity, social participation, and well-being, and inequities in these outcomes. Natural experiment studies can advance our understanding of causal effects and processes related to urban form interventions. The INTErventions, Research, and Action in Cities...
Article
Though panel data have substantial advantages over cross-sectional data in the study of travel behavior change, it also introduces logistical and methodological challenges for researchers. Retrospective surveys have the advantage of addressing many of these challenges, though the measurement validity of recalled answers remains an important concern...
Article
Full-text available
Travel is difficult without the supportive attitudes, norms, and skills that make up “motility,” the capacity for travel. Travel experiences are critical to developing motility. This study identifies factors that influence the development of bicycling motility through analysis of a prospective panel of 19 children, interviewed at ages 9, 12, and 15...
Article
Life changes are often associated with changes in travel behavior, due to a break in habitual travel cues and the introduction of a novel travel context. Universities provide a particularly appropriate setting to examine how these life changes can bring about changes in travel attitudes, norms, and skills – which together form a psychological const...
Article
Full-text available
Young adults currently obtain driver’s licenses at a substantially lower rate than previous generations. In a handful of recent studies, scholars have evaluated this trend by investigating the association of various factors, primarily personal characteristics and the built environment, with driver’s licensing. However, these studies have examined a...
Thesis
Full-text available
Bicycle sharing systems (BSS) operate on five continents, and they change quickly with technological innovations. The newest “dockless” systems eliminate both docks and stations, and have become popular in China since their launch in 2016. The rapid increase in dockless system use has exposed its drawbacks. Without the order imposed by docks and st...
Thesis
Full-text available
Bicycle sharing systems (BSS) operate on five continents, and they change quickly with technological innovations. The newest “dockless” systems eliminate both docks and stations, and have become popular in China since their launch in 2016. The rapid increase in dockless system use has exposed its drawbacks. Without the order imposed by docks and st...
Article
The quality of a worker's commute significantly impacts her well-being. We seek to add to the nascent literature on this topic by examining how travel mode, location, and other personal characteristics are associated with perceived commute quality and then by exploring implications for commute satisfaction. We use data from the annual Campus Travel...
Article
Full-text available
In the US, parking is oversupplied in both residential and commercial settings, a consequence of the widespread application of minimum parking standards, which typically supply excess parking for peak-hour demand. Yet the evidence base for specific parking reforms is thin, and alternatives to the peak-hour metric still under-explored. In this illus...
Article
Full-text available
The city of Davis, CA, has a rich history of high bicycling levels, and the city has ambitious transportation policies and goals. However, both the city of Davis and transportation scholars have overlooked the potential opportunities a surplus of on-street residential parking provides to cities. The existing literature on the influence of parking p...
Article
Through direct democracy, the voting public can engage in ballot box planning, by which voters themselves, rather than decision makers, set policy and make project decisions. Previous studies found that ballot box planning has a growing influence on land use policy as well as transportation and land use finance. However, the impact of ballot box pl...
Article
The decline in active travel to school and the concomitant rise in numbers of children being driven to school in the United States over recent decades have affected the health of school-age children and contributed to environmental problems. In response, communities throughout the country are stepping up efforts to increase active travel, including...
Article
Background A growing body of evidence shows that youth who walk or bike to school have higher levels of overall physical activity. In turn, greater physical activity is associated with lower incidence of chronic disease and better physical and psychological wellbeing. This association is especially important considering the increasing prevalence of...
Preprint
Full-text available
Human culture is widely believed to undergo evolution, via mechanisms rooted in the nature of human cognition. A number of theories predict the kinds of human learning strategies, as well as the population dynamics that result from their action. There is little work, however, that quantitatively examines the evidence for these strategies and result...

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