Callan C Frye

Callan C Frye
IsoPlexis

Master of Science

About

5
Publications
1,531
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
5
Citations
Introduction
Recently completed MSBS at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC). Interested in the impact of advanced glycation end products on macrophage protein expression and metabolic phenotype, and how these phenotypic changes promote prostate cancer progression.
Additional affiliations
April 2021 - present
IsoPlexis
Position
  • Scientific Support Specialist
August 2020 - April 2021
SQRD Lab
Position
  • Microbiology Supervisor
Description
  • I developed and validated microbial impurities testing at a cannabis testing lab in Los Angeles, CA.
February 2019 - May 2020
Medical University of South Carolina
Position
  • Research Specialist
Description
  • Supported lab activity by performing routine safety checks, preparing media and solutions, maintaining equipment, training lab members, updating and manipulating software, and general lab trouble-shooting.
Education
August 2018 - May 2020
Medical University of South Carolina
Field of study
  • Biomedical Science, Pathology
August 2013 - May 2017
Randolph College
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (5)
Article
Full-text available
The molecular implications of food consumption on cancer etiology are poorly defined. The rate of nutrition associated non-enzymatic glycoxidation, a reaction that occurs between reactive carbonyl groups on linear sugars and nucleophilic amino, lysyl and arginyl groups on fats and proteins, is rapidly increased by food cooking and manufacturing pro...
Article
Objectives Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are reactive metabolites formed endogenously by glyoxidative, oxidative and lipoxidative stresses. Foods associated with modern dietary habits are particularly AGE laden but despite increasing epidemiological evidence for oncogenic potential, cause and effect relationships are lacking. The objective...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives The literature regarding the role of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) on tumor biology has shown only moderate promise reflected by increases in cell growth, migration and invasion in vitro which is not supported by increased tumor growth in vivo14-16– A caveat to these studies is that they are centered upon a single AGE peptide an...
Conference Paper
Introduction. The focus of this study is on early lifestyle factors and their effect on mammary development during puberty and how they relate to increased breast cancer risk and disparities. At this time we do not understand what biological changes occur during pubertal mammary development which leads to a greater risk of developing cancer in late...
Article
Streptothricosis is a dermatitis characterized by matted tufts of hair and coalescing, pustular crusts that affects many livestock species, including horses. It results from cutaneous infection by the actinobacterium Dermatophilus congolensis. For economic reasons, the ailment is often treated with commercially available over-the-counter (OTC) prod...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
While the data sheet for the beta-actin antibody I use (see attached) suggests a dilution range of 1:100-1:1000, I've found that following this recommendation leaves me with bands so thick and bright that it makes comparison difficult and dodgy.
After lots of trial and error, I've found that a dilution of 1:17,500 gives me thinner, more reasonable bands, but it shocks me that I'd need to deviate so drastically from the manufacturer's recommendation. Has anyone else encountered a similar phenomenon? Or have any idea why this might be happening? If it helps, my protein usually comes from RAW264.7 or NIH3T3 cells.

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (2)
Archived project
To characterize the effects of advanced glycation end products on macrophages in support of understanding the overall impact on prostate cancer progression.