Caitriona L Douglas

Caitriona L Douglas
Dalhousie University | Dal · Department of Psychology and Neuroscience

Bachelor of Science (Honours)

About

5
Publications
969
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
1
Citation
Education
September 2019 - August 2020
Dalhousie University
Field of study
  • Psychology and Neuroscience
September 2018 - August 2019
University of Saskatchewan
Field of study
  • Psychology-Cognition and Neuroscience
September 2013 - June 2018
Dalhousie University
Field of study
  • Neuroscience (Honours)

Publications

Publications (5)
Preprint
Full-text available
The use of EEG to simultaneously record multiple brains (i.e., hyperscanning) during social interactions has led to the discovery of inter-brain coupling (IBC). IBC is defined as the neural synchronization between people and is considered to be a marker of social interaction. IBC has previously been observed across different frequency bands, includ...
Preprint
EEG hyperscanning refers to recording electroencephalographic (EEG) data from multiple participants simultaneously. Many hyperscanning experimental designs seek to mimic naturalistic behavior, relying on unpredictable participant-generated stimuli. The majority of this research has focused on neural oscillatory activity that is quantified over hund...
Poster
Our goal was to determine the feasibility of using EEG hyperscanning techniques during face-to-face conversation, to detect ERPs time-locked to individual words. Specifically, we aimed to replicate the modulation of the N400 ERP component by lexical frequency as prior studies have consistently reported larger N400s in response to low than high freq...
Poster
Full-text available
While much work has investigated brain activity in different language production and perception contexts, practical constraints have meant little is known about brain activity during natural conversation. Yet, conversation is the most fundamental mode of language use — it is how we first learn language, and represents a significant proportion of mo...
Preprint
Poster to be presented at the neurobiology of language meeting, Quebec City

Network

Cited By