Caitlin Friesen

Caitlin Friesen
Georgia State University | GSU · Neuroscience Institute

PhD

About

9
Publications
1,381
Reads
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120
Citations
Citations since 2017
4 Research Items
101 Citations
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Introduction
My research integrates ideas from genetics, endocrinology, neuroscience, and sociology to uncover the causes and consequences of individual variation in social groups. I am interested in combining information about the underlying molecular state and the dynamic social and physical environment to better understand the full range of behaviors that individuals exhibit across time and context. Learn more at https://caitlinfriesen.com/
Additional affiliations
September 2013 - October 2021
University of Texas at Austin
Position
  • PhD Student
May 2012 - April 2013
McGill University
Position
  • Research Assistant
Education
September 2013 - December 2021
University of Texas at Austin
Field of study
  • Integrative Biology
January 2009 - December 2011
McGill University
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (9)
Article
Most animals encounter social challenges throughout their lives as they compete for resources. Individual responses to such challenges can depend on social status, sex, and community-level attributes, yet most of our knowledge of the behavioral and physiological mechanisms by which individuals respond to challenges has come from dyadic interactions...
Article
Full-text available
The early social environment an animal experiences may have pervasive effects on its behaviour. The Social Decision‐Making Network (SDMN), consisting of interconnected brain nuclei from the forebrain and midbrain, is involved in the regulation of behaviours during social interactions. In species with advanced sociality such as cooperative breeders,...
Article
Prolactin is often referred to as the “parental hormone” but there are examples in which prolactin and parental behavior are disconnected. One intriguing example is in avian obligate brood parasites; species exhibiting high circulating prolactin but no parental care. To understand this disconnect, we examined transcriptional and behavioral response...
Article
Social dominance hierarchies are common in human and nonhuman animals and profoundly affect the behavior, health, and well-being of every member of a community. Research on diverse species has expanded our understanding of how ecological and social forces shape interactions influencing social status, behavior, and the underlying biology (1, 2). Acr...
Article
Full-text available
Aposematic (warning) coloration is a highly conspicuous trait that is found throughout the animal kingdom. In several aposematic species, warning signals have been co-opted for use in conspecific communication systems; for example, in the toxic and bright orange Solarte population of the strawberry poison frog (Oophaga [Dendrobates] pumilio), the b...
Article
Full-text available
Species that cross strong environmental gradients are expected to face divergent selective pressures that can act on sexually-selected traits. In the present study, we examine the role of hypoxia and carotenoid availability in driving divergence in two sexually-selected traits, male colour and reproductive behaviour, in the African cichlid Pseudocr...
Article
Measuring hormone levels multiple times on the same individual across different life stages or treatments can facilitate our understanding of hormonal regulation of physiological and behavioral events. The conventional method of hormone measurement requires blood sampling, which is potentially lethal to small individuals. In fishes, there is an alt...

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