C. E. O'Brien

C. E. O'Brien
School for Field Studies · Turks and Caicos

MS, PhD

About

12
Publications
23,464
Reads
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103
Citations
Citations since 2017
10 Research Items
101 Citations
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20172018201920202021202220230510152025
Education
October 2014 - December 2017

Publications

Publications (12)
Article
Full-text available
Cuttlefish are an important global fisheries resource, and their demand is placing increasing pressure on populations in many areas, necessitating conservation measures. We reviewed evidence from case studies spanning Europe, Africa, Asia, and Australia encompassing diverse intervention methods (fisheries closures, protected areas, habitat restorat...
Article
In the past two decades, several research groups have noted the occurrence of locomotion that resembles the bipedal walking or running of great apes in a few species of octopod (Huffard, 2005, 2006; Huffard et al., 2005; Hernández-Urcera et al., 2020; Amodio et al., 2021). To date, this form of locomotion has been documented in three species from t...
Article
Full-text available
We tested the feasibility of conducting three standard behavioural tests modified from laboratory experiments with Octopus vulgaris in its natural habitat. Twenty wild octopuses from around the island of Capri (Mediterranean Sea) were filmed as two novel objects (a piece of white plastic and an identical piece of black plastic), an artificial prey...
Article
Full-text available
Stress has profound effects on animals, particularly if it occurs during reproduction or embryonic development. The cuttlefish Sepia officinalis is an economically and scientifically important species that is often cultured in captivity. The effects of stressors applied to reproducing females and developing embryos were investigated and compared by...
Article
Full-text available
Here, three researchers who have recently embarked on careers in cephalopod biology discuss the current state of the field and offer their hopes for the future. Seven major topics are explored: genetics, aquaculture, climate change, welfare, behavior, cognition, and neurobiology. Recent developments in each of these fields are reviewed and the pote...
Article
Full-text available
Stress experienced during prenatal development—either applied to reproducing females (maternal stress), directly to developing offspring (embryonic stress) or in combination—is associated with a range of post-natal behavioral effects in numerous organisms. We conducted an experiment to discern if maternal and embryonic stressors affect the behavior...
Article
Full-text available
Cuttlefish are highly visual animals, a fact reflected in the large size of their eyes and visual-processing centers of their brain. Adults detect their prey visually, navigate using visual cues such as landmarks or the e-vector of polarized light and display intense visual patterns during mating and agonistic encounters. Although much is known abo...
Article
Full-text available
A great deal is known about development in Sepia officinalis; however, much of this knowledge comes from animals incubated in laboratory conditions. Since cuttlefish are behavioraliy plastic and known as embryos to perceive environmental stimuli from within the egg, we wondered if they are affected by incubation environment and thus whether laborat...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
A network for improvement of cephalopod welfare and husbandry in research, aquaculture and fisheries. http://www.cephsinaction.org/ http://www.cost.eu/COST_Actions/fa/FA1301 Aim: Aim of this Action is to provide the scientific basis for advancing knowledge about cephalopod welfare in research, aquaculture and public displays, and promote their conservation. The main objective is to establish an interdisciplinary network of professionals including researchers, veterinarians, NGOs, authorities and others, joined in a common effort to integrate, increase and disseminate knowledge about cephalopod welfare and experimentation, and to promote cephalopod research and conservation. This will include European researchers working with (potentially) any aspect of cephalopods biology, and those working on other marine species, as far as experts and researchers from non-COST countries. This with the common goal of complement each other in the scientific areas of expertise, experience with different species and scientific-technical perspectives in order to broaden and expand the “potential” of cephalopods in science (and biology). CephsInAction is also aimed to foster multi-disciplinary and inter-species scientific exchanges to integrate knowledge on welfare practices. Objectives: Networking CephsInAction will establish an interdisciplinary network of experts who will promote training, dissemination, sharing of tools and knowledge to improve such procedures, and it will foster multi-disciplinary and inter-species scientific exchanges to integrate knowledge on welfare practices. A network of experts and users will collect, refine, distribute, and improve knowledge that is currently distributed between research groups and available only to them. New Principles CephsInAction will allow development of new experimental practices, actions for reduction, refinement, and reuse principles when applied to cephalopods. This COST Action is also aimed to support emerging scientific demands, and to promote cephalopod research, conservation and public awareness.
Project
To study the effects of prenatal (predator odor, bright light) and maternal (daily handling) stress on size, defense, predation, activity, learning, memory and brain development in the cuttlefish, Sepia officinalis. This is part of a larger collaboration with four other French labs investigating prenatal stress effects in oviparous and precocial species (two species of birds and two species of fish). Such inquiries will inform our understanding of how prenatal stimuli influence development and growth.