Byron N. Van Nest

Byron N. Van Nest
University of Manitoba | UMN · Department of Biological Sciences

PhD

About

36
Publications
3,959
Reads
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189
Citations
Citations since 2017
8 Research Items
121 Citations
2017201820192020202120222023051015202530
2017201820192020202120222023051015202530
2017201820192020202120222023051015202530
2017201820192020202120222023051015202530
Additional affiliations
August 2019 - present
University of Manitoba
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
August 2017 - July 2019
Case Western Reserve University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
August 2016 - August 2017
Wake Forest University
Position
  • PhD Student
Education
September 2010 - May 2016
Wake Forest School of Medicine
Field of study
  • Neuroscience

Publications

Publications (36)
Article
Full-text available
The mushroom bodies (MBs) are insect brain regions important for sensory integration, learning, and memory. In adult worker honey bees (Apis mellifera), the volume of neuropil associated with the MBs is larger in experienced foragers compared with hive bees and less experienced foragers. In addition, the characteristic synaptic structures of the ca...
Article
Full-text available
Development of the mushroom bodies continues after adult eclosion in social insects. Synapsins, phosphoproteins abundant in presynaptic boutons, are not required for development of the nervous system but have as their primary function modulation of synaptic transmission. A monoclonal antibody against a conserved region of Drosophila synapsin labels...
Article
Full-text available
The honey bee time memory enables foragers to return to a profitable food source in anticipation of the time of day at which they previously collected food from that source. The time memory thus allows foragers to quickly resume exploiting a source after interruption, at the appropriate time of day, without the costs associated with having to redis...
Article
Full-text available
Honey bee foragers form time-memories that enable them to match their foraging activity to the time of day when a particular food source is most productive. Persistent foragers show food-anticipatory activity by making reconnaissance flights to the previously productive food source and may continue to inspect it for several days. In contrast, retic...
Article
Full-text available
Honey bees can form distinct spatiotemporal memories that allow them to return repeatedly to different food sources at different times of day. Although it is becoming increasingly clear that different behavioral states are associated with different profiles of brain gene expression, it is not known whether this relationship extends to states that a...
Article
1. Pollination syndromes refer to stereotyped floral characteristics (flower color, shape, etc.) that are associated with a functional group of pollinators (bee, bird, etc.). 2. The trumpet creeper Campsis radicans, endemic to the southeast and midwest United States, has been assigned to the hummingbird-pollination syndrome due mainly to its red, t...
Article
Full-text available
In the early twentieth century, Karl von Frisch performed seminal work on the organization of social behavior of honey bees. Much of his work involved training individual foragers to distant artificial feeders. Similar training methods have been used in research laboratories for the better part of a century, and these methods lend themselves well t...
Article
Honey bee (Apis mellifera) foragers can remember both the location and time of day food is collected and, even in the absence of a reward, reconnoiter the food source at the appropriate time on subsequent days. This spatiotemporal memory (time-memory) is linked to the circadian clock and enables foragers to synchronize their behavior with floral ne...
Article
Full-text available
The beginning neuroscience or psychology student does not often have the opportunity to experiment with classical conditioning. Here I present an inexpensive, easy-to-implement classical conditioning experiment taking advantage of the proboscis extension response to train honey bees to learn an appetitive olfactory association. If an apiary is avai...
Article
Full-text available
Forager honey bees exhibit a robust time memory, based on an endogenous circadian clock, enabling them to schedule their flights to coincide with the nectar presentation of known food sources. They retain this time memory for several consecutive days even in the absence of nectar rewards. Recent work has identified 2 classes of forager: "persistent...
Article
Full-text available
Most studies of foraging behavior in bees have been performed under artificial conditions. One highly neglected area is the daily nectar secretion rhythm in flowers including how nectar properties may vary with time of day. As a first step in understanding the connections between forager behavior and nectar presentation under more natural condition...
Article
Full-text available
Classical experiments demonstrated that honey bee foragers trained to collect food at virtually any time of day will return to that food source on subsequent days with a remarkable degree of temporal accuracy. This versatile time-memory, based on an endogenous circadian clock, presumably enables foragers to schedule their reconnaissance flights to...

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