Bryen A Jordan

Bryen A Jordan
Albert Einstein College of Medicine | AECOM · "Dominick P. Purpura" Department of Neuroscience

Ph.D.

About

46
Publications
23,314
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
4,722
Citations
Citations since 2016
18 Research Items
1102 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022050100150
2016201720182019202020212022050100150
2016201720182019202020212022050100150
2016201720182019202020212022050100150
Introduction
Our lab studies key players that regulate information exchange between neuronal synapses and nuclei and their potential role in brain pathologies. We found that diverse synaptic components shuttle between these two structures and that RNA binding proteins shuttle into synaptic junctions to help regulate local translation of RNA cargos following synaptic activity.
Additional affiliations
August 2015 - present
Albert Einstein College of Medicine
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
February 2008 - August 2015
Albert Einstein College of Medicine
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
June 2001 - November 2007
NYU Langone Medical Center
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (46)
Article
Full-text available
Neuronal development, plasticity and survival require activity-dependent synapse-to-nucleus signaling. Most studies implicate an activity-dependent regulation of gene expression in this phenomenon. However, little is known about other nuclear functions that are regulated by synaptic activity. Here we show that a newly identified component of rat po...
Article
Full-text available
The opioid system modulates several physiological processes, including analgesia, the stress response, the immune response and neuroendocrine function. Pharmacological and molecular cloning studies have identified three opioid-receptor types, delta, kappa and mu, that mediate these diverse effects. Little is known about the ability of the receptors...
Article
Long-term changes of neurotransmitter release are critical for proper brain function. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these changes are poorly understood. While protein synthesis is crucial for the consolidation of postsynaptic plasticity, whether and how protein synthesis regulates presynaptic plasticity in the mature mammalian brain...
Article
Full-text available
Neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism spectrum disorder, have complex polygenic etiologies. Single-gene mutations in patients can help define genetic factors and molecular mechanisms underlying neurodevelopmental disorders. Here we describe individuals with monogenic heterozygous microdeletions in ANKS1B, a predicted risk gene for autism a...
Article
Full-text available
The transport and translation of dendritic mRNAs by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) allows for spatially restricted gene expression in neuronal processes. Although local translation in neuronal dendrites is now well documented, there is little evidence for corresponding effects on local synaptic function. Here, we report that the RBP Sam68 promotes the...
Article
Full-text available
Stress is the most common trigger among episodic neurologic disorders. In episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2), physical or emotional stress causes episodes of severe motor dysfunction that manifest as ataxia and dystonia. We used the tottering (tg/tg) mouse, a faithful animal model of EA2, to dissect the mechanisms underlying stress-induced motor attacks....
Preprint
Full-text available
Our understanding of oligodendrocytes in brain function and disease is changing rapidly. We recently reported that heterozygous deletions in the ANKS1B gene lead to ANKS1B syndrome, a neurodevelopmental disorder presenting with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and speech and motor deficits. ANKS1B encodes fo...
Article
The assembly and egress of alphaherpesviruses, including Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and Pseudorabies virus (PRV), within neurons is poorly understood. A key unresolved question is the structure of the viral particle that moves by anterograde transport along the axon, and two alternative mechanisms have been described. In the “Married” mode...
Preprint
Full-text available
Impaired synaptic function is a common phenotype in animal models for autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and ASD risk genes are enriched for synaptic function. Here we leverage the availability of multiple ASD mouse models exhibiting synaptic deficits and behavioral correlates of ASD and use quantitative mass spectrometry with isobaric tandem mass tag...
Article
Full-text available
Long-lasting forms of postsynaptic plasticity commonly involve protein synthesis-dependent structural changes of dendritic spines. However, the relationship between protein synthesis and presynaptic structural plasticity remains unclear. Here, we investigated structural changes in cannabinoid-receptor 1 (CB1)-mediated long-term depression of inhibi...
Article
Full-text available
Long-lasting forms of postsynaptic plasticity commonly involve protein synthesis-dependent structural changes of dendritic spines. However, the relationship between protein synthesis and presynaptic structural plasticity remains unclear. Here, we investigated structural changes in cannabinoid-receptor 1 (CB1)-mediated long-term depression of inhibi...
Article
Full-text available
Long-lasting forms of postsynaptic plasticity commonly involve protein synthesis-dependent structural changes of dendritic spines. However, the relationship between protein synthesis and presynaptic structural plasticity remains unclear. Here, we investigated structural changes in cannabinoid-receptor 1 (CB1)-mediated long-term depression of inhibi...
Preprint
Full-text available
Long-lasting forms of postsynaptic plasticity commonly involve protein synthesis-dependent structural changes of dendritic spines. However, the relationship between protein synthesis and presynaptic structural plasticity remains unclear. Here, we investigated structural changes in cannabinoid-receptor 1 (CB1)-mediated long-term depression of inhibi...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction: Women are at increased risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD), but the reason why remains unknown. One hypothesis is that low estrogen levels at menopause increases vulnerability to AD, but this remains unproven. Methods: We compared neuronal genes upregulated by estrogen in ovariectomized female rhesus macaques with a database of >17,0...
Article
Full-text available
Transmembrane adaptor proteins (TRAPs) are important organisers for the transduction of immunoreceptor-mediated signals. Prr7 is a TRAP that regulates T cell receptor (TCR) signalling and potently induces cell death when overexpressed in human Jurkat T cells. Whether endogenous Prr7 has a similar functional role is currently unknown. To address thi...
Article
Full-text available
Elevated c-Jun levels result in apoptosis and are evident in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and dementia and after global cerebral insults including stroke and epilepsy. NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antagonists block c-Jun upregulation and prevent neuronal cell death following excitotoxic insults. However, the molecular mechanisms...
Article
Full-text available
Dendritic spines were first described by Santiago Ramon y Cajal more than one hundred years ago when he examined Golgi-stained cerebellar Purkinje cells of birds. Since then, considerable effort has been put towards understanding how these structures are formed and what their functions in the central nervous system are. It is now well established t...
Article
Full-text available
Decades of research have demonstrated that rapid alterations in protein abundance are required for synaptic plasticity, a cellular correlate for learning and memory. Control of protein abundance, known as proteostasis, is achieved across a complex neuronal morphology that includes a tortuous axon as well as an extensive dendritic arbor supporting t...
Article
Full-text available
NMDA receptors (NMDARs) are key mediators of glutamatergic transmission and synaptic plasticity, and their dysregulation has been linked to diverse neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. While normal NMDAR function requires regulated expression and trafficking of its different subunits, the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes...
Article
Full-text available
Decades of research has shown that long-term changes in synaptic function ultimately require changes in gene expression. Recent work has focused on nuclear signaling by calcium and protein messengers initiated at postsynaptic sites. In this issue of The EMBO Journal, Ivanova and colleagues show that shuttling of CtBP-1 between presynaptic areas and...
Article
Full-text available
Dendritic protein homeostasis is crucial for most forms of long-term synaptic plasticity, and its dysregulation is linked to a wide range of brain disorders. Current models of metabotropic glutamate receptor mediated long-term depression (mGluR-LTD) suggest that rapid, local synthesis of key proteins is necessary for the induction and expression of...
Article
Full-text available
Proper synaptic function requires the spatial and temporal compartmentalization of RNA metabolism via transacting RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Loss of RBP activity leads to abnormal posttranscriptional regulation and results in diverse neurological disorders with underlying deficits in synaptic morphology and transmission. Functional loss of the 68...
Article
Full-text available
Neuronal activity elicits changes in synaptic composition that play an important role in experience-dependent plasticity (Choquet and Triller, 2003; Lisman and Raghavachari, 2006; Bourne and Harris, 2008; Holtmaat and Svoboda, 2009). We used a modified version of stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture to identify activity-dependent...
Article
Sustained activity-dependent synaptic modifications require protein synthesis. Although proteins can be synthesized locally in dendrites, long-term changes also require nuclear signaling. Amyloid-beta protein precursor intracellular domain-associated protein-1 (AIDA-1), an abundant component of the biochemical postsynaptic density fraction, contain...
Article
In neurons multiple signaling pathways converge in the nucleus to regulate the expression of genes associated with long-term structural changes of synapto-dendritic input. Of pivotal importance for this type of transcriptional regulation is synapse-to-nucleus communication. Several studies suggest that the nuclear transport of proteins from synapse...
Chapter
In this chapter we review proteomic studies performed on purified postsynaptic density (PSD) fractions and analyze what their results reveal about nuclear signaling. Overall, these studies show that PSDs are similar to the cytoplasmic protein complexes found at other intercellular junctions. We find that PSDs contain numerous calmodulin (CAM)-assoc...
Article
Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been proposed to remodel the extracellular environment of neurons. Here, we report that the metalloproteinase membrane-type 5 MMP (MT5-MMP) binds to AMPA receptor binding protein (ABP) and GRIP (glutamate receptor interaction protein), two related postsynaptic density (PSD) PDZ (postsynaptic density-95/Discs la...
Article
Full-text available
Large numbers of synaptic components have been identified, but the effect so far on our understanding of synaptic function is limited. Now, network maps and annotated functions of individual components have been used in a systems biology approach to analyzing the function of NMDA receptor complexes at synapses, identifying biologically relevant mod...
Chapter
Full-text available
Most questions in modern cell biology have been approached using reductionist methods, i.e., by studying one gene, one protein or one specific protein modification at a time. This reductionism has been necessary, given the complexity of biological systems and lack of tools for developing more integrative methodologies. It is, nonetheless, responsib...
Article
Full-text available
The postsynaptic density (PSD) is a cellular structure specialized in receiving and transducing synaptic information. Here we describe the identification of 452 proteins isolated from biochemically purified PSD fractions of rat and mouse brains using nanoflow HPLC coupled to electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Fluorescence microscopy...
Article
Full-text available
Adrenergic and opioid receptors belong to the rhodopsin family of G-protein coupled receptors, couple to analogous signal transduction pathways, and affect the nociceptive system. Although a number of previous studies have reported functional interactions between these two receptors, the basis for this has not been well explored. We propose that di...
Article
Opioid receptors belong to the family of G-protein-coupled receptors characterized by their seven transmembrane domains. The activation of these receptors by agonists such as morphine and endogenous opioid peptides leads to the activation of inhibitory G-proteins followed by a decrease in the levels of intracellular cAMP. Opioid receptor activation...
Article
G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise the largest family of transmembrane receptors in the human genome that respond to a plethora of signals, including neurotransmitters, peptide hormones, and odorants, to name a few. They couple to second messenger signaling cascade mechanisms via heterotrimeric G-proteins. Recently, many studies have reve...
Article
Full-text available
G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have recently joined the list of cell surface receptors that dimerize. Dimerization has been shown to alter the ligand-binding, signaling, and trafficking properties of these receptors. Recent studies have shown that GPCRs heterodimerize with closely related members, resulting in the modulation of their function....
Article
Protein-protein interactions are involved in the regulation of a large number of biological processes. It is well established that a variety of cell surface receptors interact with each other to form dimers, and that this is essential for their activation. Although the existence of G protein coupled receptor dimers was predicted from early pharmaco...
Article
Full-text available
Opiate analgesics are widely used in the treatment of severe pain. Because of their importance in therapy, different strategies have been considered for making opiates more effective while curbing their liability to be abused. Although most opiates exert their analgesic effects primarily via mu opioid receptors, a number of studies have shown that...
Article
Opiate analgesics are widely used in the treatment of severe pain. Because of their importance in therapy, different strategies have been considered for making opiates more effective while curbing their liability to be abused. Although most opiates exert their analgesic effects primarily via mu opioid receptors, a number of studies have shown that...
Article
No field more eagerly awaits a molecular clarification for G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) dimerization than the opioid receptor field. Extensive evidence of pharmacological and functional interactions between opioid receptor types has primed this field for such a resolution. In retrospect, much of the data collected on synergy between different...
Article
Internalization and downregulation are important steps in the modulation of receptor function. Recent work with the beta2 adrenergic and opioid receptors have implicated these processes in receptor-mediated activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). We have used CHO cells expressing epitope-tagged rat kappa opioid receptors (rKORs) and...
Article
Full-text available
key experiments have resulted in extensive pharmacological characterization of opioid receptors, the presence of heterologous receptor populations and low expression in cells have always hampered further receptor studies. Recent cloning of the , and opioid receptors 16 27 49 117 has allowed many quest ions to be answered by expressing receptor cDNA...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
Anyone have mass spectrometry experience identifying protein interactomes by coupling immunoprecipitations to isobaric labeling like iTRAQ, TMT, ICAT etc?  I have tissue, so no SILAC or other prelabeling techniques are possible (or financially appealing), and want to IP a protein complex. The idea is that isotope coded labeling of the IP and a control IP should convincingly identify signal vs background. I’m well aware of interference issues with mass tags, but in our experience brute force identification of the whole IP (including the massive amounts of contaminants that bind nonspecifically to agarose beads) can be confusing.  Any thoughts? Alternatives?

Network

Cited By