Bryant Wayne Buchanan

Bryant Wayne Buchanan
Utica College · Department of Biology

Professor of Biology

About

23
Publications
20,326
Reads
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935
Citations
Introduction
I am interested in how environmental and sensory constraints affect the ecology and evolution of nocturnal animals. We are currently particularly interested in the effects of light pollution on the behavior, growth, and development of larval and adult amphibians.
Additional affiliations
August 2001 - present
Utica College
Position
  • Professor (Full)
August 1998 - June 2001
Stephens College
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
Education
January 1989 - May 1993
University of Louisiana at Lafayette
Field of study
  • Environmental and Evolutionary Biology

Publications

Publications (23)
Article
Full-text available
Amphibians and reptiles have evolved with natural lighting cycles. Consequently, alteration of natural variation in diurnal and nocturnal light intensities and spectral properties has the potential to disrupt their physiology, behavior, and ecology. We review the possible effects of night lighting on many species of amphibians and reptiles, noting...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract. Biologists studying anuran amphibians usually assume that artificial, visible light does not affect the behaviour of nocturnal frogs. This assumption was tested in a laboratory experiment. The foraging behaviour of grey treefrogs, Hyla chrysoscelis, was compared under four lighting conditions: ambient light (equivalent to bright moonlight...
Conference Paper
Background / Purpose: Artificial light at night has increasingly become an additional stressor for wildlife, especially for nocturnal animals in which the physiology and behavior of these species have evolved under dark conditions.We hypothesized that the behavior of a terrestrial, nocturnally-active salamander (the Red-backed Salamander, Plethod...
Article
Full-text available
Anuran amphibians have provided an excellent system for the study of animal communication and sexual selection. Studies of female mate choice in anurans, however, have focused almost exclusively on the role of auditory signals. In this study, we examined the effect of both auditory and visual cues on female choice in the squirrel treefrog. Our expe...
Article
Full-text available
We assembled groups of up to eight male gray treefrogs, Hyla versicolor, in an artificial pond and examined vocal behavior under conditions of different chorus size. Males avoided call overlap when calling in groups of two, but not in larger choruses. The pattern of interference failed to reveal selective attention based on inter-male separation, a...
Article
Full-text available
We studied female mate choice by Hyla versicolor in three venues to examine how acoustic and spatial complexity, background noise, and the calling behavior of males might influence preferences manifest in previous laboratory two-stimulus choice tests. Our laboratory-based two-stimulus choice tests with and without broadcasts of chorus noise demonst...
Article
Full-text available
Reviews the territorial behaviour of salamanders, with sections based on fundamental life history strategies: completely terrestrial; species that are terrestrial as adults but have complex life cycles (ie aquatic larvae); species with complex life cycles and predominantly semi-aquatic adults; and predominantly or completely aquatic species. After...
Article
Full-text available
Biologists studying anuran amphibians usually assume that artificial, visible light does not affect the behaviour of nocturnal frogs. This assumption was tested in a laboratory experiment. The foraging behaviour of grey treefrogs, Hyla chrysoscelis, was compared under four lighting conditions: ambient light (equivalent to bright moonlight, 0·003 lx...
Article
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Southwestern Louisiana, 1993. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 145-158). Vita. Microfilm. s

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