Bryan G. Mark

Bryan G. Mark
The Ohio State University | OSU · Department of Geography

PhD

About

164
Publications
53,884
Reads
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5,873
Citations
Additional affiliations
March 2004 - present
The Ohio State University
Position
  • Researcher
December 2001 - March 2004
Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry Jena
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (164)
Article
Full-text available
The Eastern Corn Belt Region (ECBR) is an important agricultural sector for the U.S. This study analyzes the climate extremes over the contemporary (1980–2018) and future (2036–2099) periods over the ECBR. We evaluated the performance of 32 downscaled models from the U.S. Global Change Research Program's Localized Constructed Analogs (LOCA) of the...
Article
Our limited knowledge of the timing and pattern of early Holocene climate variability in the tropical Andes hinders our ability to evaluate any potential linkages between low and high latitude oceanic-atmospheric dynamics. There is mounting evidence that glaciers in the Peruvian Andes stabilized at times during the early Holocene, suggesting there...
Article
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Although protected areas (PAs) play an important role in ecosystem conservation and climate change adaptation, no systematic information is available on PA protection of high-elevation freshwater ecosystems (e.g., lakes and watersheds with glaciers), their biodiversity and their ecosystem services in the tropical Andes. We therefore combined a lite...
Preprint
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This article provides a comprehensive hydrometeorological dataset collected over the past two decades throughout the Cordillera Blanca, Peru. The data recording sites, located in the upper portion of the Rio Santa valley, also known as the Callejon de Huaylas, span an elevation range of 3738–4750 m a.s.l. As many historical hydrological stations me...
Article
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Analyses of macroscopic charcoal, sediment geochemistry (%C, %N, C/N, δ ¹³ C, δ ¹⁵ N), and fossil pollen were conducted on a sediment core recovered from Stella Lake, Nevada, establishing a 2000 year record of fire history and vegetation change for the Great Basin. Charcoal accumulation rates (CHAR) indicate that fire activity, which was minimal fr...
Chapter
Glaciers are both dynamic agents of landscape modification and frozen reservoirs of water that manifest complex geomorphological couplings to society spanning multiple scales of space and time, as conceptualized by the glacial waterscape. This article provides an overview of key threads in glacial geomorphology research that explores how the expans...
Article
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The Mountain Research Initiative (MRI) promotes basic and applied research to understand how drivers and processes of global change present challenges and opportunities in mountain social-ecological systems. It convenes a global network that collectively generates and synthesizes knowledge on global change in mountains that also supports decisions...
Article
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An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via a link at the top of the paper.
Article
Full-text available
An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via a link at the top of the paper.
Article
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Mountains of the arid Great Basin region of Nevada are home to critical water resources and numerous species of plants and animals. Understanding the nature of climatic variability in these environments, especially in the face of unfolding climate change, is a challenge for resource planning and adaptation. Here, we utilize an Embedded Sensor Netwo...
Article
Full-text available
An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via a link at the top of the paper.
Article
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Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is recognized as a good indicator of water quality as its concentration is influenced by land use, rainwater, windborne material and anthropogenic activities. Recent technological advances make it possible to characterize fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM), the fraction of DOM that fluoresces. Among these adv...
Article
Assessing the impact of climate change on floodplain productivity poses unique challenges for hydrodynamic models. For example, the dynamics of floodplain fisheries are governed both by inundation dynamics across thousands of km², and water storage timing within small depressions (which serve as fish habitat) connected to the river network by meter...
Article
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A comprehensive database of paleoclimate records is needed to place recent warming into the longer-term context of natural climate variability. We present a global compilation of quality-controlled, published, temperature-sensitive proxy records extending back 12,000 years through the Holocene. Data were compiled from 679 sites where time series co...
Article
Sub-Saharan floodplains are sensitive to climatic changes in their upstream drainage basin, a major concern is given the dependency of millions of people for their daily subsistence. Understanding hydroclimatic trends and variability is critical for developing integrated coupled human and natural system models to evaluate future scenarios of vulner...
Article
As a result of climate warming and glacier recession, glacierized watersheds will experience a decrease in dry season discharge and an increase in wet season discharge, with negative consequences for water quality. The glacierized Rio Santa watershed in Peru provides the unique opportunity to study these concerns, because it drains the mountain ran...
Article
This paper reviews current understanding of deglaciation in North, Central and South America from the Last Glacial Maximum to the beginning of the Holocene. Together with paleoclimatic and paleoceanographic data, we compare and contrast the pace of deglaciation and the response of glaciers to major climate events. During the Global Last Glacial Max...
Article
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The glaciers near Puncak Jaya in Papua, Indonesia, the highest peak between the Himalayas and the Andes, are the last remaining tropical glaciers in the West Pacific Warm Pool (WPWP). Here, we report the recent, rapid retreat of the glaciers near Puncak Jaya by quantifying the loss of ice coverage and reduction of ice thickness over the last 8 y. P...
Article
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Accelerating mountain glacier recession in a warming climate threatens the sustainability of mountain water resources. The extent to which groundwater will provide resilience to these water resources is unknown, in part due to a lack of data and poorly understood interactions between groundwater and surface water. Here we address this knowledge gap...
Article
The dramatic loss of glacial mass in low latitudes is causing shifts in downstream water availability and use during the driest months of the year. The world’s largest concentration of tropical glaciers lies in the Cordillera Blanca range of Peru, where glacial runoff is declining and regional stresses are emerging over water resources. Throughout...
Article
Cushion plant dominated peatlands are key ecosystems in tropical alpine regions of the Andes in South America. The cushion plants have formed peat bodies over thousands of years that fill many valley bottoms, and the forage produced by the plants is critical for native and non‐native domesticated mammals. The sources and flow paths of water support...
Article
Surface soil moisture is a critical but often neglected component of the hydrologic budget. Within mountain environments, surface soil moisture is highly heterogeneous and challenging to measure. Point measurements are often poorly representative of larger areas, while satellite pixels are generally too coarse in these topographically varied landsc...
Article
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Climate models predict amplified warming at high elevations in low latitudes, making tropical glacierized regions some of the most vulnerable hydrological systems in the world. Observations reveal decreasing streamflow due to retreating glaciers in the Andes, which hold 99 % of all tropical glaciers. However, the timescales over which meltwater con...
Article
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Evaluating the historical contribution of the volume loss of ice to stream flow based on reconstructed volume changes through the Little Ice Age (LIA) can be directly related to the understanding of glacier-hydrology in the current epoch of rapid glacier loss that has disquieting implications for a water resource in the Cordillera Blanca in the Per...
Article
Fieldwork rarely goes to plan. In geography, anthropology, earth sciences and other research activities that rely on field data, trade-offs are required between planning and execution. This article addresses the adaptation of research projects to changing fieldwork conditions. It is based on a case study of interdisciplinary and international “Coup...
Article
After the publication of our article Testing the skill of numerical hydraulic modeling to simulate spatiotemporal flooding patterns in the Logone floodplain, Cameroon’ in the Journal of Hydrology, volume 539 (2016) 265-280, we discovered an error in the simulations utilized for the paper. Specifically, a typo in an input file meant that rainfall wa...
Article
Full-text available
The rapidly melting glaciers of Peru are posing new risks to regional dry season water supplies, and this is evident in the Cordillera Blanca, the mountain range with the world's largest concentration of tropical glaciers. Permanent ice loss is causing reductions to dry season streamflow, which is coupled with shifting demands and control over wate...
Article
Full-text available
Climate models predict amplified warming at high elevations in low latitudes, making tropical glacierized regions some of the most vulnerable hydrological systems in the world. Observations reveal decreasing streamflow due to retreating glaciers in the Andes, which hold 99 % of all tropical glaciers. However, the timescales over which meltwater con...
Article
Full-text available
Tropical glaciers constitute an important source of water for downstream populations. However, our understanding of glacial melt processes is still limited. One observed process that has not yet been quantified for tropical glaciers is the enhanced melt caused by the longwave emission transfer. Here, we use high-resolution surface temperatures obta...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Mountain glaciers throughout the world are retreating; a trend that is expected to accelerate over the next several decades due to anthropogenic climate change. In some places glaciers are projected to completely disappear, while the area of frozen ground will diminish and the ratio of snow to rainfall will decrease. These changes will also affect...
Article
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La dramática pérdida de glaciares en la cuenca alta del río Santa en Ancash, Perú, tiene un impacto significativo en los sistemas hidrológicos proglaciales, con implicaciones para los factores estresantes aguas abajo en las actividades de uso humano del agua. Este estudio integra el análisis hidroquímico y la exploración espacial en múltiples escal...
Article
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The objective of this research is to characterize the variability of trace metals in the Rio Santa watershed based on synoptic sampling applied at a large scale. To that end, we propose a combination of methods based on the collection of water, suspended sediments, and riverbed sediments at different points of the watershed within a very limited pe...
Article
Full-text available
The glaciers of the Cordillera Blanca, Peru, are rapidly retreating and thinning as a result of climate change, altering the timing, quantity and quality of water available to downstream users. Furthermore, increases in the number and size of proglacial lakes associated with these melting glaciers is increasing potential exposure to glacier lake ou...
Article
Researching glacier-melt impacted hydrology in the Andes motivates us to collect on-demand, high-resolution multispectral imagery, and digital elevation models (DEMs). While adverse conditions in these remote mountain locations present technical challenges for motorized unmanned aerial systems (UAS), consistent katabatic winds allow for testing lig...
Article
Accelerating glacier recession in tropical highlands and in the Peruvian Andes specifically is a manifestation of global climate change that is influencing the hydrologic cycle and impacting water resources across a range of socio-environmental systems. Despite predictions regarding the negative effects of long-term glacier decline on water availab...
Article
Full-text available
The cryosphere in mountain regions is rapidly declining, a trend that is expected to accelerate over the next several decades due to anthropogenic climate change. A cascade of effects will result, extending from mountains to lowlands with associated impacts on human livelihood, economy, and ecosystems. With rising air temperatures and increased rad...
Article
Full-text available
The tropical Andes of Peru and Bolivia are important for preserving geomorphic evidence of multiple glaciations, allowing for refinements of chronology to aid in understanding climate dynamics at a key location between hemispheres. This review focuses on the deglaciation from Late-Pleistocene maximum positions near the global Last Glacial Maximum (...
Article
Full-text available
To estimate hydrological storage and better understand the climatic implications of glacier retreat, the volume of glacial ice is a critical but problematic variable. High-accuracy mapping of glacier surface changes over time can directly estimate volume changes, allowing for explicit testing and refining of scaling relationships between changes in...
Article
Evaluating the timing and style of past glacier fluctuations in the tropical Andes is important for our scientific understanding of global environmental change. Terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide (TCN) ages on moraine boulders combined with 14C-dated clastic sediment records from alpine lakes document glacial variability in the Cordillera Blanca of Per...
Article
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/gec3.12318/full Mountain glaciers are transient hydrologic reservoirs persisting at the habitable extremes of Earth that both document and respond to climate change. They withhold water in solid phase from other reservoirs and ultimately impact sea levels. Moreover, they are valued resources with economic...
Article
Full-text available
The cryosphere in mountain regions is rapidly declining, a trend that is expected to accelerate over the next several decades due to anthropogenic climate change. A cascade of effects will result, extending from mountains to lowlands with associated impacts on human livelihood, economy, and ecosystems. With rising air temperatures and increased rad...
Article
Full-text available
The glaciers of the Cordillera Blanca Peru are rapidly retreating as a result of climate change, altering timing, quantity and quality of water available to downstream users. Furthermore, increases in the number and size of proglacial lakes associated with these melting glaciers is increasing potential exposure to glacier lake outburst floods (GLOF...
Article
Full-text available
Peru is facing imminent water resource issues as glaciers retreat and demand for water increases, yet limited observations and model resolution hamper understanding of hydrometerological processes on local to regional scales. Much of current global and regional climate studies neglect the meteorological forcing of lapse rates (LRs) and valley and s...
Article
Full-text available
The people of Andean Ecuador face considerable risks due to climate change; however, a fundamental obstacle for those seeking to understand these risks is the lack of detailed, long-term meteorological data for the region. This research describes recent patterns of climate change at Volcán Chimborazo, Ecuador, through an integration of climatologic...
Article
Receding mountain glaciers affect the hydrology of downslope ecosystems with consequences for drinking water, agriculture, and hydropower production. Here we combined land cover derived from satellite imagery and other environmental data from the northern Peruvian Andes into a first differencing regression model to assess wetland hydrologic connect...
Article
Full-text available
Dramatic glacier loss in the upper Santa River watershed in Ancash, Peru has significant impact on proglacial hydrologic systems, with implications for downstream stressors on human water use activities. This study integrates hydrochemical analysis and spatial exploration across multiple scales with the aim of exploring patterns and controls of ino...
Poster
Full-text available
Predicting the Effects of Man-Made Fishing Canals on Floodplain Inundation – A Modelling Study
Article
Full-text available
Glacierized mountains are often referred to as our world's water towers because glaciers both store water over time and regulate seasonal stream flow, releasing runoff during dry seasons when societies most need water. Ice loss thus has the potential to affect human societies in diverse ways, including irrigation, agriculture, hydropower, potable w...
Article
This interdisciplinary paper presents an empirical analysis of techno-institutional lock-in in a regional fishery, in the Logone floodplain in the Far North Region of Cameroon. In the Logone floodplain, one fishing technique is spreading exponentially even though it is changing the social, hydrological and ecological dynamics of the system in ways...
Poster
Tropical glaciers, which are particularly susceptible to global warming, are found in the lower latitudes of Asia and Africa, although 99% of the world’s tropical glaciers are located in the Andes of South America. The lack of seasonality in tropical temperatures, distinct wet and dry seasons, and year-round ablation of these glaciers give rise to...