Bryan D Devan

Bryan D Devan
Towson University | TU · Department of Psychology

Associate Professor, Ph.D.

About

51
Publications
7,822
Reads
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1,898
Citations
Introduction
Research Interests -- Neurobiology of spatial navigation in animals and humans -- Functional organization of multiple memory systems in the mammalian brain -- Behavioral animal models of neurodegenerative diseases and neuropsychological disorders -- Cognitive enhancement and neuroprotection in age-related memory decline Links homepage: http://pages.towson.edu/bdevan/Welcome.htm laboratory website: http://pages.towson.edu/bdevan/LCN.htm
Additional affiliations
January 2005 - December 2008
March 2003 - August 2005
National Institute on Aging
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Behavioral Pharmacology/Behavioral Neuroscience
April 2002 - February 2003
NeuroLogic, Inc.
Position
  • Researcher
Education
August 1993 - February 1998
McGill University
Field of study
  • Experimental Psychology: Behavioral Neuroscience

Publications

Publications (51)
Article
Full-text available
Extensive preclinical research on multiple memory systems has reveal detailed neurobehavioral profiles of cognitive memory (S-S), simple habit (S-R) and higher-order habit [(S-S)-R] associative functions of the hippocampus, dorsolateral striatum/putamen and the dorsomedial striatum/caudate nucleus, respectively (Devan, McDonald, & White, 1999; Deva...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Extensive preclinical research on multiple memory systems has reveal detailed neurobehavioral profiles of cognitive memory (S-S), simple habit (S-R) and higher-order habit [(S-S)-R] associative functions of the hippocampus, dorsolateral striatum/putamen and the dorsomedial striatum/caudate nucleus, respectively (Devan, McDonald, & White, 1999; Deva...
Poster
Full-text available
Extensive preclinical research on multiple memory systems in the mammalian brain has revealed behavioral measures of cognition and procedural retention using a novel competitive learning and memory task in the Morris water maze. The experimental results have led to a tripartite memory systems model predictive of neurodegenerative disease vulnerabil...
Article
Full-text available
Technological advances have made it possible to capture a specific assembly of neurons active during a learning event and manipulate the captured cells, demonstrating some form of relationship between brief retention events and the cell assembly. The reductionists' claim of localizing the engram has been met with considerable skepticism. The potent...
Poster
Full-text available
Following the famous case of H.M. who received a bilateral medial temporal lobectomy causing severe anterograde amnesia, animal researchers investigated the role of different structures in cognitive memory formation, with spared habit formation as in H.M. These investigations eventually led to a dissociation of memory systems that can function inde...
Chapter
Full-text available
A view of the organization of learning and memory function in the mammalian brain is presented suggesting that there are multiple learning and memory systems, that although functional dissociable, interact in complex ways to produce thoughts and behavior. Our goal is to take the reader from the early historical origins of this idea through classic...
Article
This study investigated sex differences on the competitive place version of the Morris water maze task to determine whether potential strategy differences would emerge during any phase of the study but in particular on the competitive place phase. Previous findings indicate that this version of the task is highly sensitive to measures that disrupt...
Article
Full-text available
The publication of a recent article in F1000Research has led to discussion of, and correspondence on a broader issue that has a long history in the fields of neuroscience and psychology. Namely, is it possible to separate the cognitive components of performance, in this case spatial behavior, from the motoric demands of a task? Early psychological...
Article
Full-text available
The publication of a recent article in F1000Research has led to discussion of, and correspondence on a broader issue that has a long history in the fields of neuroscience and psychology. Namely, is it possible to separate the cognitive components of performance, in this case spatial behavior, from the motoric demands of a task? Early psychological...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Improvement on spatial tasks is observed during a late, postnatal developmental period (PND18 – PND24). The purpose of the current work was 1) to determine whether the emergence of spatial-behavioral function was based on the ability to generate appropriate behavioral output; 2) to assess whether mossy fiber connectivity patterns preceded the emerg...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Improvement on spatial tasks is observed during a late, postnatal developmental period (PND18 – PND24). The purpose of the current work was 1) to determine whether the emergence of spatial-behavioral function was based on the ability to generate appropriate behavioral output; 2) to assess whether mossy fiber connectivity patterns preceded the emerg...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
A variation of the water maze competitive place task (McDonald et al., 2005; Fig 1) was used to study the role of the hippocampus (HPC) and medial caudate-putamen (mCPu) (see Fig 2) in spatial navigation and higher-order [(S-S)-R] habit formation. Rats received distributed place training for 18 days (4 trials/day) with the hidden platform located i...
Article
Full-text available
Previous studies have shown that cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibition with the drugs sildenafil and vardenafil can enhance spatial performance and object recognition in rodent models of learning and memory. We review recent studies on PDE5 inhibition and report novel data that specifically tests the systemic effects of both...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The present study investigated the possible role of mu-opiate receptors within the dorsal striatum in the spatial navigation performance of rats trained in the water maze. Intrastriatal guide cannula were stereotaxically implanted to target the anteromedial part of the caudate-putamen (CPu) complex and following a 2-3 week recovery period, subjects...
Article
Full-text available
The monkey's ability to learn a set of visual discriminations presented concurrently just once a day on successive days (24-h ITI task) is based on habit formation, which is known to rely on a visuo-striatal circuit and to be independent of visuo-rhinal circuits that support one-trial memory. Consistent with this dissociation, we recently reported...
Article
Full-text available
The 14-unit T-maze has proven to be a valuable tool for investigating age-associated memory impairment (AAMI). While another task widely used to evaluate AAMI, the water maze, is primarily used to evaluate allocentric hippocampal-dependent spatial memory, the 14-unit T-maze can assess egocentric procedural memory. Although several brain structures,...
Article
Full-text available
Traditionally, research into the neurobiological mechanisms of age-related memory impairments has focused on single neurotransmitter systems. As normal and abnormal age-related declines in memory function probably involve alterations in more than one system, a more effective approach for elucidating underlying neurobiological changes and resulting...
Article
Full-text available
In a previous study, our laboratory reported that sildenafil citrate, a cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor, reversed a learning impairment in rats induced by systemic inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (60 mg/kg, i.p., Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester; L-NAME). To limit the peripheral effects of L-NAME and further localize th...
Article
Full-text available
Young male Fischer-344 rats were fed a diet containing 2% blueberry (BB) extract or control diet for at least 8 weeks and then received bilateral hippocampal injections of kainic acid (KA 200 ng/0.5 microl) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS). One week later rats were trained in one-way active footshock avoidance in a straight runway followed the ne...
Article
Full-text available
The nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) signal transduction pathway has been implicated in some forms of learning and memory. Recent findings suggest that inhibition of phosphodiesterase (PDE) enzymes that degrade cGMP may have memory-enhancing effects. We examined whether treatment with sildenafil citrate, a PDE type 5 inhibito...
Article
Full-text available
Drug development for the treatment of dementia and age-related cognitive decline has been slow to produce clinically viable alternatives to the two existing FDA approved drug treatments, AChE inhibitors and the noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist, memantine. Recent human and preclinical animal studies suggest that phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5...
Article
Full-text available
Male Fischer-344 rats (n = 38) at 5 months old were tested in a Morris water maze to determine if treatment with the cholinesterase inhibitor, phenserine (PHEN), would overcome a learning impairment induced by scopolamine (SCOP), a muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonist. Each rat was randomly assigned to one of five groups to receive two intrap...
Article
Full-text available
We examined whether treatment with sildenafil citrate (the active compound of Viagra), a cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor (PDE5), would reverse the learning impairment induced by cholinergic muscarinic (mACh) receptor blockade [0.75 mg/kg scopolamine HCl, intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections]. Rats were pretrained in a one-way acti...
Article
Full-text available
Various research problems are presented to illustrate the utility of using the interactive multiple learning and memory systems view to better understand normal and abnormal manifestations of mammalian behaviour. Evidence for incidental learning and memory processes is presented and various implications of this work are discussed. Empirical and the...
Article
Full-text available
Two relatively simple theories of brain function will be used to demonstrate the explanatory power of multiple memory systems in your brain interacting cooperatively or competitively to directly or indirectly influence cognition and behaviour. The view put forth in this mini-review is that interactions between memory systems produce normal and abno...
Article
Full-text available
The effect of the amino acid d-serine, a partial NMDA receptor agonist, on a delayed match-to-place task in the water maze was examined. Twenty-four male rats were first trained to attain baseline measurements, then administered D-serine or saline. Rats administered D-serine (100 mg/kg, i.p.) before swim trials did not show a decrease in escape lat...
Article
Full-text available
We studied the effects of partial reinforcement on escape performance and place learning in the water maze. Rats given 50% reinforcement across trials (i.e. the escape platform was present only on odd trials) were compared to controls given 100% reinforcement (platform present on all trials). Control groups either received 8 or 4 trials per day, wh...
Article
Full-text available
We investigated individual differences in the stimulus control of navigational behavior in the water maze by comparing measures of place learning in one environment to measures of latent learning (via passive placement on the goal platform) in a novel environment. In the first experiment, 12 rats were trained to find a slightly submerged hidden pla...
Article
Full-text available
The effects of partial reinforcement on dry land and swimming pool place learning tasks have recently been compared and it has been suggested that they differ fundamentally [8]. That is, partial reinforcement impairs performance in the water maze, but not on dry land. However, other evidence suggests that partial reinforcement may have the opposite...
Article
It is thought that circadian rhythms may influence learning and memory processes. However, research supporting this view does not dissociate a mnemonic impairment from other performance deficits. Furthermore, published reports do not specify the type of memory system influenced by the circadian system. The present study assessed the effects of phas...
Article
Full-text available
Rats with dorsomedial or dorsolateral caudate-putamen lesions and sham-operated controls were trained on the standard hidden platform (place) task in the water maze. Compared to controls, rats with dorsomedial, but not dorsolateral lesions were slower to escape to the hidden platform and spent significantly more time swimming near the wall of the p...
Article
Full-text available
We investigated the effects of localized medial and lateral CPu lesions and fornix/fimbria lesions on responses to a local cue and to behavior based on cognitive-spatial information in the water maze. Rats were trained concurrently on the cue (visible platform) and spatial (submerged platform) components of the task, followed by a test in which res...
Article
Full-text available
Two experiments were conducted to compare the effects of fornix/fimbria and caudate-putamen lesions in Long-Evans hooded rats (Rattus norvegicus) trained on two water maze tasks that differed in the type of spatial localization required for optimum solution. In Experiment 1, the lesioned rats and surgical controls were trained on the standard place...
Article
Full-text available
Thesis (M.A.)--Towson State University, 1993. Vita. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 95-123).
Article
Full-text available
Investigated the major motives underlying pleasure travel by factor-analyzing the responses of 325 Ss on a travel motivation survey. Analysis uncovered 5 orthogonal factors, which together accounted for 46.6% of the total response variance. The 5 factors were anomie/authenticity-seeking, culture/education, escape/regression, wanderlust/exploring th...
Article
Full-text available
Two procedural components of place navigation training in the Morris (1981) water task were studied. Specifically, rats were required to escape onto a submerged (hidden) platform located in either a fixed or a pseudorandomly varied position throughout training; Following escape, the animals were either given unrestricted visual access to the extram...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Rationale: The nitric oxide (NO)–cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) signal transduction pathway has been implicated in some forms of learning and memory. Recent findings suggest that inhibition of phosphodiesterase (PDE) enzymes that degrade cGMP may have memory-enhancing effects. Objectives: We examined whether treatment with sildenafi...
Article
Full-text available
Recent anatomical investigations have revealed that the striatum is an intrinsically heterogeneous structure that forms multiple parallel circuits with different cortical areas. The present series of experiments investigated the possibility that such anatomical diversity may promote functional differences between subregions of the rat dorsal striat...
Article
Full-text available
Thesis (Ph.D.)--McGill University, 1997. Includes bibliographical references.

Questions

Question (1)
Question
There are several theories of basal ganglia function, leading many of us to propose segregation of functionally heterogeneous subregions within the dorsal striatum [e.g., see our 2011 review in Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, vol. 96, pp. 95-120]. Given the subregional variation in several neurochemical markers within the striatum, are the functional distinctions related to the compartmental organization of the patch-matrix system?

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Evaluate ongoing research at multiple levels of memory organization
Project
Spatial Navigation in Animals and Humans Virtual water maze was introduced in 1998, our lab takes a comparative neuropsychological approach - how different mammals, humans and rats, perform spatial tasks. Are the brain regions involved the same? Do different people with neuropsychological disorders or degenerative diseases use different strategies as appears to be the case with rats that have experimental lesions? Do “normal” individuals prefer different strategies, for example, reports of sex/gender differences related ego- versus allo-centric spatial cues and fast versus slow “place learners” ability to learn a new spatial layout passively (a room with a view), without active movement through the environment. Multiple Memory Systems: Organization and Interactions The original distinction was that the hippocampus contributes to cognitive-spatial memory formation (consolidating episodic memory) while the striatum contributes to simple stimulus-response (S-R) habit formation. We’ve investigated whether part of the striatum that receives limbic and prefrontal input also contributes to cognitive-spatial memory formation, possibly by forming higher-order [(S-S)-R] habits that originally are cognitive but become habit-like over time with repeated reinforcement. We have found that different sub-regions of the striatum may contribute to simple and higher-order habit formation and are interested in the circuitry and neurochemical signals that may contribute to such associative learning processes. Further, we are interested in interactions across systems and at multiple levels of organization. Models of Neurodegenerative Diseases (e.g., AD and PD) Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease affect different memory systems (predominantly the hippocampus or striatum, respectively). Consequently, there is the opportunity to study patients using virtual navigation tasks and other cognitive measures to see if behavioral and strategic performance is similar to the many experimental lesion studies done with rodents using a comparative approach. Neuropsychological Disorders (e.g. Dementia, OCD) Modeling human disease and psychological disorders in rodents is important to test the efficacy of different treatments and other interventions. Scopolamine, a cholinergic antagonist impairs memory and models the cholinergic deficiency observed in AD patients. In the striatum, there is an intricate network of different neurochemical compartments that is poorly understood functionally but could be an important factor in pharma development to target subareas of the striatum. Preliminary evidence suggests that naloxone, a mu-opiate receptor antagonist, when injected directly into the striatum of awake animals may reduce their tendency to repeat checking behavior, i.e. returning to a previously learned goal location in the water maze. Psychopharmacology, Cognitive Enhancement and Nutritional Supplements Targeting neurotransmitter systems in developing psychopharmacological treatments has limited utility in memory research, consequently more recent studies have focused on downstream modulation of second messenger systems cGMP and/or cAMP, along with interactive synergies focusing on multiple systems simultaneously, Although it is clear through our research that targeting phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE5i) as well as other isozymes that prolong second messenger activity produces significant but modest improvements in preclinical rodent studies, alternatives and combination-target therapies are more likely to be more effective in a clinical setting. Current scientific findings suggest that diet may play an important role in whether a person develops neurodegenerative disease and cognitive decline as they get older. Pharmacological agents that potently stimulate NMDA receptors in brain, like D-cycloserine and D-serine, may offer a new target in drug therapy, while nutritional supplements like potent antioxidant superfruits and chemicals found in cocoa and wine, (e.g., procyanidin) that are cardioprotective, may provide opportunities to intervene early and avoid cognitive decline in aging and the development of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease late in life. Memory Decline in Aging and Neuroprotection Age-related memory decline is increasing in frequency as our life expectancy increases. There are various approaches to protecting neurons and glial cells chemically, whether invasively by systemic or direct intracerebral administration of an agent into the brain, or indirectly by external stimulation that affects the production or release of endogenous chemicals, e.g., enriching the environment or providing specific stimuli known to increase blood levels of hormones like testosterone, estrogen or oxytocin (i.e., altering endogenous psychopharmacology). These less invasive external provide natural changes in brain chemistry that should be further investigated and may have important therapeutic effects.