Bruno F. Simões

Bruno F. Simões
University of Plymouth | UoP · School of Biological and Marine Sciences

Lic MSc PhD

About

19
Publications
4,588
Reads
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253
Citations
Additional affiliations
August 2012 - August 2015
Natural History Museum, London
Position
  • PostDoc Position
January 2008 - January 2012
University College Dublin
Position
  • PhD Student
October 2005 - October 2007
CIBIO Research Center in Biodiversity and Genetic Resources
Position
  • Master's Student
Education
January 2008 - May 2012
University College Dublin
Field of study
  • Evolutionary Biology
October 2005 - October 2007
University of Porto
Field of study
  • Biodiversity and Genetic Resources
October 2000 - December 2004
University of the Azores
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (19)
Chapter
Snakes comprise nearly 4,000 extant species found on all major continents except Antarctica. Morphologically and ecologically diverse, they include burrowing, arboreal, and marine forms, feeding on prey ranging from insects to large mammals. Snakes are strikingly different from their closest lizard relatives, and their origins and early diversifica...
Article
Full-text available
Molecular genetic data have recently been incorporated in attempts to reconstruct the ecology of the ancestral snake, though this has been limited by a paucity of data for one of the two main extant snake taxa, the highly fossorial Scolecophidia. Here we present and analyse vision genes from the first eye transcriptomic and genome-wide data for Sco...
Article
Many ambush-foraging snakes move their tails to entice prey within striking range (‘caudal luring’). During ontogeny, the conspicuous hues of caudal lures change to match the cryptic patterning of the body/head. This coincides with decreased luring behaviour and reflects the trade-off between prey acquisition and camouflage as the snake grows. Aust...
Article
Snakes are descended from highly visual lizards [1] but have limited (probably dichromatic) color vision attributed to a dim-light lifestyle of early snakes [2, 3, 4]. The living species of front-fanged elapids, however, are ecologically very diverse, with ∼300 terrestrial species (cobras, taipans, etc.) and ∼60 fully marine sea snakes, plus eight...
Article
We examined lens and brille transmittance, photoreceptors, visual pigments, and visual opsin gene sequences of viperid snakes with and without infrared-sensing pit organs. Ocular media transmittance was high in both groups. Contrary to previous reports, both small and large single cones occur in pit vipers. Non-pit vipers differ from pit vipers in...
Article
The Pig-footed Bandicoot, Chaeropus ecaudatus, an extinct arid-adapted bandicoot, was named in 1838 based on a specimen without a tail from the Murray River in New South Wales. Two additional species were later named, C. castanotis and C. occidentalis, which have since been synonymised with C. ecaudatus. Taxonomic research on the genus is rather di...
Article
We examined lens and brille transmittance, photoreceptors, visual pigments, and visual opsin gene sequences of viperid snakes with and without infrared-sensing pit organs. Ocular media transmittance was high in both groups. Contrary to previous reports, both small and large single cones occur in pit vipers. Non-pit vipers differ from pit vipers in...
Article
Dermal phototaxis has been reported in a few aquatic vertebrate lineages spanning fish, amphibians and reptiles. These taxa respond to light on the skin of their elongate hind‐bodies and tails by withdrawing under cover to avoid detection by predators. Here, we investigated tail phototaxis in sea snakes (Hydrophiinae), the only reptiles reported to...
Article
Full-text available
Through their unique use of sophisticated laryngeal echolocation bats are considered sensory specialists amongst mammals and represent an excellent model in which to explore sensory perception. While several studies have shown that the evolution of vision is linked to ecological niche adaptation in other mammalian lineages, this has not yet been fu...
Poster
Full-text available
Poster on tail phototaxis in sea snakes. Abstract: Non-visual photoreception, i.e light detection not involved in image forming vision, is best known among marine invertebrates, but far fewer examples have been described among vertebrates. Olive sea snakes, Aipysurus laevis, are the only snakes reported to show non-visual phototaxis and this unique...
Chapter
The long history and great ecological and morpho- logical diversity of reptiles (all amniotes except mammals and birds) is matched by their visual system diversity. Although less known than in other amniotes, visual pigments have been studied in all extant reptile orders except Sphenodontia. There have been no additions to the five visual pigments...
Article
Much of what is known about the molecular evolution of vertebrate vision comes from studies of mammals, birds and fish. Reptiles (especially snakes) have barely been sampled in previous studies despite their exceptional diversity of retinal photoreceptor complements. Here we analyse opsin gene sequences and ocular media transmission for up to 69 sp...
Article
Full-text available
In 1934, Gordon Walls forwarded his radical theory of retinal photoreceptor ‘transmutation’. This proposed that rods and cones used for scotopic and photopic vision, respectively, were not fixed but could evolve into each other via a series of morphologically distinguishable intermediates. Walls' prime evidence came from series of diurnal and noctu...
Article
The dominant hypothesis for the evolutionary origin of snakes from 'lizards' (non-snake squamates) is that stem snakes acquired many snake features while passing through a profound burrowing (fossorial) phase. To investigate this we examined the visual pigments and their encoding opsin genes in a range of squamate reptiles, focusing on fossorial li...
Article
Full-text available
We analysed the phylogenetic relationships between M. d. daubentonii and M. d. nathalinae based on 1,010 bp of the cytochrome b mtDNA gene. The inference based on molecular phylogenetics methods shows that these two morphotypes correspond to two mitochondrial groups within the Iberian Peninsula. Our results also support the model of ‘refugia within...
Presentation
Full-text available
Holarctic Chrysoperla carnea is a complex of sibling species known as "carnea complex", whose unique courtship songs prevent them from interbreeding in nature and lead C. Henry in 2003 to describe C. agilis. Its geographic range is westerly limited by Madeira and Azores archipelagos. The insular biogeographic paths linking the two archipelagos, led...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Holarctic Chrysoperla carnea is a complex of sibling species known as the "Chrysoperla carnea complex", whose diverse courtship songs have led to the recognition of several cryptic species, including C. agilis Henry et al. 2003. The geographic range of C. agilis is westerly limited by Madeira and Azores. The climatic diffe-rences between the two ar...

Projects

Project (1)
Project
Night divers first discovered light sensitivity in sea snake skin when they noticed that sheltering snakes retracted their tails in response to torchlight. We aim to understand the evolutionary origins and molecular mechanisms of remarkable trait.