Bruno Marques

Bruno Marques
Victoria University of Wellington · Wellington School of Architecture

PhD MLA BLA

About

69
Publications
28,635
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
270
Citations
Citations since 2017
56 Research Items
269 Citations
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100
Introduction
Bruno Marques is the Associate Dean (Academic Development) and Senior Lecturer in Landscape Architecture at Victoria University of Wellington, Faculty of Architecture and Design Innovation. His main research interests relate to the integration of Indigenous methods in participatory design and place-making in landscape rehabilitation and ecosystem services. Bruno is the President of the International Federation of Landscape Architects (IFLA) (2022-2024).
Additional affiliations
July 2021 - present
Victoria University of Wellington
Position
  • Head of Faculty
February 2019 - July 2021
Victoria University of Wellington
Position
  • Managing Director
January 2019 - present
Victoria University of Wellington
Position
  • Lecturer
Education
June 2019 - June 2022
University of Otago
Field of study
  • Landscape Architecture and Planning
September 2005 - May 2008
Technische Universität Berlin
Field of study
  • Landscape Architecture
September 2002 - June 2005
Technical University of Lisbon
Field of study
  • Landscape Architecture

Publications

Publications (69)
Article
Full-text available
To recognize the significance of indigenous cultures and their landscapes as well as to appraise these places, identification and evaluation have to focus on indigenous worldviews rather than on the deeply embedded Western civilization ideals and values of the design. Australian Aboriginal and New Zealand's Maori cultures are genuinely rooted in ex...
Article
Full-text available
In Aotearoa/New Zealand landscapes were personified by the Indigenous Māori through the contention that the relationship with the land forms the basis of their existence, where everything visible and invisible, tangible and intangible is inseparable. However, in the current context, cultural and ancestral landscapes have been desecrated by growing...
Article
Full-text available
Although research has long established that interaction with the natural environment is associated with better overall health and well-being outcomes, the Western model mainly focuses on treating symptoms. In Aotearoa/New Zealand, the Indigenous Māori have long demonstrated significantly more negative health outcomes than non-Māori. Little research...
Article
Full-text available
Academic research has long established that interaction with the natural environment is associated with better overall health outcomes. Notably, the area of therapeutic environments has been borne out of the recognition of this critical relationship, but much of this research comes from a specific Western perspective. In Aotearoa-New Zealand, Māori...
Chapter
Full-text available
Research has shown that Indigenous people suffer significant health inequalities in comparison to dominant colonising cultures. Evidence shows that these inequalities can be addressed by gaining a deeper understanding of the social and cultural determinants of health, applying Indigenous views of health and developing better definitions of the term...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In the island nation of Aotearoa New Zealand, the history of migration and increased globalisation is exerting pressure on existing social and cultural frameworks and creating challenges and opportunities for how public open space can be created and used. This pressure is influencing Māori, the Indigenous people of New Zealand, through a combinatio...
Article
Full-text available
The role of courtyards and other outdoor spaces in the recovery of acute mental healthcare users has been gaining international appreciation and recognition. However, the physical properties and conditions necessary for therapeutic and rehabilitative engagement remain to be clearly established. This paper contributes to that knowledge by triangulat...
Article
Full-text available
The outdoor environment offers an important platform for engaging older adults from a variety of social, cultural and ethnic orientations for the purpose of improving or maintaining their physical and mental health as well as facilitating their social and cultural connections. Using a multidisciplinary lens, this study looks at the requirements and...
Thesis
In Aotearoa New Zealand, where biculturalism has emerged as a viable organising national ideology, the role of landscape is highly contested. The Indigenous Māori of Aotearoa New Zealand contend that their relationship with the land shapes how the cultural, spiritual, emotional, physical and social well-being of people and communities are expressed...
Article
Full-text available
Renewed focus on mental health has put the spotlight on the ‘black box’ that is the acute mental health facility. Drawing on a larger programme of research, key issues relevant to the planning and design of mental health units were identified from in-depth interviews with those using the facilities. Contemporary issues included visibility from the...
Article
Full-text available
The novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak and its extensive variants have caused drastic changes to people’s habits and routines in many countries worldwide, including Aotearoa—New Zealand. The levels of lockdown and/or movement limitations affected how people used outdoor spaces, often keeping them away from nature’s benefits. The COVID-19 pandemi...
Preprint
Full-text available
Although research has long established that the interaction with the natural environment is associated with better overall health and well-being outcomes, the Western model mainly focuses on treating the symptoms. In Aotearoa-New Zealand, the Indigenous Māori have long demonstrated significantly more negative health outcomes than non-Māori. Little...
Article
Full-text available
Background People who smoke with serious mental illness carry disproportionate costs from smoking, including poor health and premature death from tobacco-related illnesses. Hospitals in New Zealand are ostensibly smoke-free; however, some mental health wards have resisted implementing this policy. Aim This study explored smoking in acute metal hea...
Article
Full-text available
Iconic architecture and landscape architecture are most often understood through photographic media that mediates between the idea and the reality for those learning to design. The drastic lockdown responses to COVID-19 and the limitations on local and international travel highlighted the importance of the visual and the potential of the virtual. H...
Article
Full-text available
Design studios play an important role in training future architects and designers, representing a key space for experimentation and creative practice in the education of architecture, landscape architecture and interior architecture students. Unlike other courses, design studios confront students with the concrete practical aspects of the design pr...
Article
Full-text available
Globally, large cities are implementing guidelines to ensure that environment, economics and sociality are at the forefront of urban design. Promotion of healthier streets has created new opportunities for social and commercial interaction and more inclusive outcomes. However, while most megacity streets share commonalities, the streets in medium-d...
Chapter
Full-text available
Current concepts of therapeutic landscape combine landscape with principles of holistic health and the interaction of social, affective and material factors. As social tensions widen the gap between the places of emotional retreat and healing from those of everyday sociability, concepts of therapeutic landscape are evolving to reflect society's cur...
Article
Full-text available
With increasing prevalence of mental illness, there is an ever-growing need for supportive and rehabilitative social and health services and facilities. In many countries, the healthcare infrastructure, transitional services and communities are isolated from one another, creating physical and mental barriers to rehabilitation. Therapeutic landscape...
Chapter
Community participation has become one of the hot topics for policy development and planning practices across the globe. Over the last decades, a huge effort has been put into bringing more under-represented communities and/or ethnic minorities into the decision-making processes that directly affect them, reversing the bureaucratic and standardised...
Article
Full-text available
Evidence shows that maintaining a relationship with nature is essential for human health and wellbeing. This is of great importance when migration to urban areas is increasing globally and the need for nature as well as green and blue spaces as a source of recreation and relaxation is highly regarded for the health and wellbeing of local communitie...
Article
Full-text available
The connection the Māori, the Indigenous people of Aotearoa-New Zealand, have to the land is threatened by the effects of colonisation, urbanisation and other factors. In particular, many Māori suffer significant health and wellbeing inequalities compared to the non-Māori population. In an effort to reduce such inequalities, there is a growing cons...
Article
Full-text available
The use of technology for social connectivity and achieving engagement goals is increasingly essential to the overall wellbeing of our rapidly ageing population. While much of the extant literature has focused on home automation and indoor remote health monitoring; there is a growing literature that finds personal health and overall wellbeing impro...
Article
Full-text available
There is increasing recognition that culture plays a crucial role in shaping therapeutic environments; from fundamental conceptions of wellness and healing, through to cultural relationships with the natural world, and to how spaces are shaped by culturally-specific construction methods and materials. This paper approaches the concept of therapeuti...
Article
Full-text available
As with many Indigenous cultures, the Māori connection to the land in Aotearoa-New Zealand has been weakened by colonization, urbanization and other factors. In particular, Māori youth in their progressively technological world, experience a disconnection from their culture and their land (whenua). Using a participatory design method and designing...
Article
Full-text available
Research on architectural technology for health care has rapidly increased in recent years; however, little research has been conducted on the use of virtual reality for simulating impairment. This exploratory research maps the experiences of people with impairments in the often-overlooked corridors and waiting rooms of an emergency department. It...
Article
Full-text available
Aotearoa-New Zealand's legal, ecological and social perspectives are composed of combined Pākehā (NZ European) and Māori identities, values, perspectives and traditions. These two very different cultural perspectives are reflected in the conversations and dialogues occurring with regards to the landscape, and also in the lands forms and features it...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Over a few decades, there is a steady accretion of life expectancy in many countries. Significant advances in modern healthcare technologies, medicines and overall health care awareness gave many to lead a prolonged healthy life. Over the past few years, there has been a huge demand for unobtrusive health monitoring systems from both medical profes...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
There are several differences in architectural forms and cultural systems between the east and the west, which are attributed to different traditional philosophical ontologies. China takes "Tao" as its ideological basis emphasizes: "Nothing". Chinese fundamental principles are deeply related to philosophy and metaphysics. Traditional culture pursue...
Article
Full-text available
Degradation of ecosystem services, scarcity of resources and the erosion of the planet's capability to absorb waste is of immediate concern. This situation is novel in its speed, its global and local scale and its threat to the planet and its people. Inspired by the recent discourse of the Anthropocene, this paper explores the convergence of human...
Article
Full-text available
Education is an important foundation of society yet children with impairments have limited opportunities for participation in school activities. There is a lack of functionality in the design of school spaces and outdoor play areas for children with impairments, arguably as there are insufficient performance guidelines that target the body conditio...
Article
Full-text available
Increasingly, our built and natural environments are becoming hybrids of real and digital entities where objects, buildings and landscapes are linked online in websites, blogs and texts. In the case of Aotearoa New Zealand, modern lifestyles have put Māori indigenous oral narratives at risk of being lost in a world dominated by text and digital ele...
Article
Full-text available
In the context of the highly compact bicultural capital city of Wellington, New Zealand, this paper explores the development of an ecosanctuary initiated by the community. The indigenous flora and fauna was damaged as a result of the introduction of mammalian predators and aggressive plant species when the country was colonized, and through intensi...
Article
Full-text available
A military lifestyle can have profound impacts on an individual’s health and wellbeing. Increasingly, new technologies such as the creation of Virtual Reality (VR) are being explored as bridging mecha-nisms to provide ‘space’ and to aid with other therapies. The overarching research programme investi-gates the therapeutic and social qualities of la...
Article
Full-text available
Existing research supports a wide range of positive effects for physical, mental and social wellbeing from outdoor exercise, particularly through engagement with nature, however few current landscapes facilitate exercise participation and efficacy for older persons and often require targeted design refinement to foster accessibility, inclusivity an...
Chapter
Full-text available
The meanings of place and the relationship between place and health have culturally specific dimensions. This is of particular importance for indigenous people and communities as often regarding landscape as part of a circle of life, establishing a holistic perspective about health and wellbeing. The indigenous Māori of Aotearoa/New Zealand contend...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
With increasing prevalence of mental illness and domestic violence incidents, there is an ever-growing need for supplying supportive and rehabilitative social and health services. In its current state, the healthcare infrastructure, transitional services, and communities are isolated from one another, creating physical and mental barriers for rehab...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Within healthcare architecture, there is a void of attention directed towards the non-medical spaces; the waiting rooms, hallways and all ‘between moments’ where many people spend extended periods of time under acute stress. Nowhere is this more prevalent that in the emergency departments where patients seek care and treatment for real or perceived...
Article
Full-text available
Physical inactivity has significant implications for overall health status, especially among older adults and poor participation in physical activity can worsen the physical, mental and sociological functioning in old age. As a result, increased participation in physical activity through exercise prescription (Green Prescription) continues to be en...
Chapter
Full-text available
The meanings of place and the relationship between place and health have culturally specific dimensions. This is of particular importance for indigenous people and communities as often they regard landscape as part of a circle of life, establishing a holistic perspective with respect to health and well-being. The indigenous Māori of Aotearoa/New Ze...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter proposes that the philosophy of phenomenology is highly applicable, if not necessary, for a deeper and more integrated approach to spatial design disciplines in a world that aspire to be sustainable. The chapter develops upon the frameworks established by Heidegger, Jean-Paul Sartre, and Merleau-Ponty, and the works since which have at...
Article
Full-text available
Cities competing for tourist dollars strive for distinctiveness in an increasingly globalised world, a distinctiveness that is frequently achieved through the making of new urban icons. These icons are designed as symbols of success and wealth and can be visual, tangible, and imaginary or real in a climate where publicity and perception play an eve...
Chapter
Full-text available
Interdisciplinary collaborative design for culturally-diverse and under-represented communities hinges on understanding cultural environments; building trusting relationships and fostering a respectful approach to community. It requires a diverse disciplinary knowledge and the capacity to take action by blurring the boundaries between disciplines....
Article
CITY KNOW-HOW Human health and planetary health are both influenced by city lifestyles, city leadership, and city development. For both, worrying trends are leading to increasing concern. It is imperative that both become core foci in urban policy. Changing the trajectory will require concerted action. The journal Cities & Health journal is dedicat...
Article
Full-text available
Successful design for culturally-diverse communities hinges on a nuanced understanding of the cultural environment; building trusting relationships and fostering a respectful approach to community. This paper discusses the application of design-led research with a participatory mind-set and maintains that while a collaborative, interdisciplinary pa...
Chapter
Full-text available
Successful design for culturally-diverse communities hinges on a nuanced understanding of the cultural environment; building trusting relationships and fostering a respectful approach to community. This paper discusses the application of design-led research with a participatory mind-set and maintains that while a collaborative, interdisciplinary pa...
Article
Full-text available
New Zealand is a nation with legal, ecological, and social perspectives composed of combined Pākehā (NZ European) and Māori identities, values, perspectives, and traditions. Its landscape, therefore, reflects the interactions, dialogues, and conflicts of the convergences of these two very different cultural perspectives as well as more recent migra...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The indigenous Maori of New Zealand contend that the relationship they have with the land, shapes the ways in which the cultural, spiritual, emotional, physical and social wellbeing of people & communities are expressed. While research has explored the concepts of Maori health, few studies have explored the influence of the cultural beliefs & value...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The overpopulating growth attendant with high-density urban living has stressed natural landscapes in most major urban centres, devastating their rich indigenous ecologies. In the case of New Zealand, the mid-19th century colonisation saw the introduction of predators and aggressive plant species, significantly scarring and reshaping the landscape....
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Elderly morbidity rates are rising with the ageing global population. The attendant mobility loss will challenge not only individual independence but also the wider community, both economically and socially. To compensate for this health loss and the subsequent demands placed on the health care system, there is a growing demand for effective preven...
Article
Full-text available
This submission is multi-disciplinary in nature and gives insight into how public health outcomes can be influenced by fields such as landscape architecture and design. Furthermore, it adds to existing health promotion knowledge by informing on a potential option of healthcare intervention in older populations. The submission identifies the potenti...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Over the last century urbanisation and vehicle-orientated development has resulted in large-scale environmental deterioration that has fostered disconnection from the outdoors and decreased levels of personal engagement with the physical landscape. This is associated with increasing levels of physical inactivity, which is of particular concern for...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In New Zealand, biculturalism has emerged as a viable organizing national ideology, where the role of landscape is highly contested. However, the combination of a dominant culture of New Zealanders of European descent with a highly urbanized society (88% of the overall population), has resulted in the deterioration of the environment and a loss of...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Globally, there is an increase in populations of older individuals. This elderly demographic presents its own unique challenges to the development of urban and rural areas, including the implementation of a physical environment that promotes the maintenance of independence in the face of the increased morbidity and impairment. The development of di...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In a rapidly urbanising world, the need for authentic wilderness experience is increasingly therapeutic and spiritually meaningful. Internationally known for its picturesque landscapes, New Zealand encourages both locals and tourists to experience them first hand by walking one of the many tracks around the country, an activity locally known as tra...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Globally, ageing populations will challenge urban and rural areas to find not only suitable housing, but to develop more efficient ways of maintaining health and social connectivity during peoples' later years. Ethnic complexity and contextual diversity can create uptake barriers in relation to physical activity and exercise for this older demograp...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
New Zealand’s landscape is an invaluable resource that is often taken for granted and undervalued in today’s economy. Providing economic benefits alongside cultural identity, the natural landscape is fast diminishing as the population expands and development sprawls. Currently development is driven by economic benefits, often having adverse effects...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The World Health Organisation suggests that younger onset dementia (YOD) requires specific consideration as it often affects people who are physically fit, socially more active, employed with dependent children and whose behaviour may be more challenging for care givers. Currently, there are no specialised services for people with YOD in New Zealan...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Internationally, supported housing, which provides dependent older people with levels of support and care in their private dwelling, has been reported to provide a greater sense of well-being and a superior quality of life than support in residential care facilities. However, a study indicated high levels of dissatisfaction with this form of housin...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Internationally known for its picturesque landscape, New Zealand attracts both locals and tourists to experience these them first hand by walking the many tracks around the country. The most notable of these have been established as ‘Great Walks’ involving multi-day treks for fit individuals. The contribution of outdoor experience is well researche...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Dementia has become one of the most feared of all diseases, with people over 50 fearing it more than cancer. The progressive and distressing nature of the symptoms extend beyond the person with dementia. Secure dementia care facilities are generally disconnected from the community and often confine their residents. The lack of resources to provide...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
New Zealand’s landscape is an invaluable resource that is often taken for granted and undervalued in today’s economy. Providing economic benefits alongside cultural identity, the natural landscape is fast diminishing as the population expands and development sprawls. Currently development is driven by economic benefits, often having adverse effects...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Since the 1970s more than half of the Tokelau population has relocated to New Zealand due to limited natural resources and overcrowding of the 10 km2 land area. This raises issues related to the cultural identity and wellbeing of Tokelau people in New Zealand. Local Tokelau community groups in the Wellington region seek to maintain their cultural t...
Article
Full-text available
Indigenous peoples in many parts of the world relate to landscape in ways that reflect their experience, differing from the Western understanding of land and landscapes. The relationship between people and land is formed principally in spiritual terms instead of as a material asset. Many indigenous cultures believe in earth as a sacred environment...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The continuing revisions of modernist positivism post World War II led to the increasing recognition of the necessary integration of functionalism with humanistic concerns. As a consequence, psychology, especially behavioural and cognitive psychology, became an area of interest for architecture, urban design and landscape architecture research. Dur...
Article
Full-text available
Emerging from the safety blanket of its 20th-century technological and scientific parameters, landscape architecture is increasingly being recognised as a broad cultural, ecological, and artistic practice. Leading practitioners, understanding that economic sustainability and cultural identity are just as much a part of their remit as raising aspira...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
One of the most appropriate means for investigation of landscape and landscape changes is maps, which are related to the information stored in the specific location. Estonian Historical Archives’ Map Collection contains an estimated nearly one hundred thousand maps dating back to 17th century’s first half. In the 18th century large mapping works we...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The relationships between people and the landscape around them are complex and based on interaction. All the things can hear us and understand us, because all the things are capable of talking. Even the crack sound made by the ice on the lakes is a new kind of speech of the land. This deference to the natural elements, the clear sense that the grou...

Questions

Questions (2)
Question
Dear Colleagues,
The fundamental goal of scholarship in the field of landscape architecture is to enhance the practice of designing, planning, conserving and managing the land. Due to the inherently multifunctional nature of landscapes, both biophysical and cultural, many scholars and practitioners have addressed the importance of multi-, trans- and interdisciplinary approaches to landscape architecture education, research and practice. Such approaches have resulted in new skills, competences, methods, and processes to be articulated, and have led to professional organisations being more involved in accrediting and regulating educational programmes, advancing continuous professional development and training and introducing ethical and moral codes for professional practice.  Despite major efforts in teaching and research activities that nurture the future of design professions, considerable challenges still confront efforts to reconcile the academic and professional facets. Demands of professional organisations in terms of landscape architectural standards, curriculum development and recognition procedures as well as the changing focus of design pedagogy faced by higher education providers are putting at risk the long-term outcomes of landscape architecture and planning and its fundamental role in promoting social and environmental justice.
This Special Issue invites papers that discuss and present perspectives from both academia and professional practice in landscape architecture which address the synergies between academic programmes and professional organisations. We aim for this Special Issue to critically look at existing system barriers and opportunities afforded by educational standards and assessment of landscape architecture programmes and to explore strategies required to promote a better collaboration between education institutions and professional bodies in terms of landscape design, planning, conservation and management.
Bruno Marques, Andreja Tutundžić, Emilia Weckman and Marina Cervera Alonso de Medina Guest Editors
Question
Special Issue Information
Dear Colleagues,
The fundamental goal of scholarship in the field of landscape architecture is to enhance the practice of designing, planning, conserving and managing the land. Due to the inherently multifunctional nature of landscapes, both biophysical and cultural, many scholars and practitioners have addressed the importance of multi-, trans- and interdisciplinary approaches to landscape architecture education, research and practice. Such approaches have resulted in new skills, competences, methods, and processes to be articulated, and have led to professional organisations being more involved in accrediting and regulating educational programmes, advancing continuous professional development and training and introducing ethical and moral codes for professional practice. 
Despite major efforts in teaching and research activities that nurture the future of design professions, considerable challenges still confront efforts to reconcile the academic and professional facets. Demands of professional organisations in terms of landscape architectural standards, curriculum development and recognition procedures as well as the changing focus of design pedagogy faced by higher education providers are putting at risk the long-term outcomes of landscape architecture and planning and its fundamental role in promoting social and environmental justice.
This Special Issue invites papers that discuss and present perspectives from both academia and professional practice in landscape architecture which address the synergies between academic programmes and professional organisations. We aim for this Special Issue to critically look at existing system barriers and opportunities afforded by educational standards and assessment of landscape architecture programmes and to explore strategies required to promote a better collaboration between education institutions and professional bodies in terms of landscape design, planning, conservation and management.
Bruno Marques, Andreja Tutundžić, Emilia Weckman and Marina Cervera Alonso de Medina Guest Editors

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (8)
Archived project
Our special issue "Landscape Architecture Education and Professional Practice and Its Future Challenges in Landscape Design, Planning, Conservation and Management" is now published. Great work with Andreja Tutundzic, Emilia Weckman and Marina Cervera 12 high-calibre papers, including the work of Prof Carl Steinitz and Prof SueAnne Ware and many more. All free access! #landscapearchitecture #education #professionalpractice https://www.mdpi.com/journal/land/special_issues/Landscape_Architecture_Education.
Project
The fundamental goal of scholarship in the field of landscape architecture is to enhance the practice of designing, planning, conserving and managing the land. Due to the inherently multifunctional nature of landscapes, both biophysical and cultural, many scholars and practitioners have addressed the importance of multi-, trans- and interdisciplinary approaches to landscape architecture education, research and practice. Such approaches have resulted in new skills, competences, methods, and processes to be articulated, and have led to professional organisations being more involved in accrediting and regulating educational programmes, advancing continuous professional development and training and introducing ethical and moral codes for professional practice. Despite major efforts in teaching and research activities that nurture the future of design professions, considerable challenges still confront efforts to reconcile the academic and professional facets. Demands of professional organisations in terms of landscape architectural standards, curriculum development and recognition procedures as well as the changing focus of design pedagogy faced by higher education providers are putting at risk the long-term outcomes of landscape architecture and planning and its fundamental role in promoting social and environmental justice. This Special Issue invites papers that discuss and present perspectives from both academia and professional practice in landscape architecture which address the synergies between academic programmes and professional organisations. We aim for this Special Issue to critically look at existing system barriers and opportunities afforded by educational standards and assessment of landscape architecture programmes and to explore strategies required to promote a better collaboration between education institutions and professional bodies in terms of landscape design, planning, conservation and management.
Project
The global COVID-19 pandemic has changed almost every aspect of our lives. Most countries have implemented preventative measures to mitigate the spread of the virus. The purpose of these measures is mainly social distancing, which includes changes to and restrictions of the use of public space. Movement of people as well as social contact have been reduced to a minimum and it has become a social responsibility (often law-enforced) to stay at home. As the global market and service providers adjust to the realm of the pandemic, many places have started to introduce online, virtual tours and experiences. This shift also applies to urban parks and gardens, public spaces, and even national parks. Exercise and sport activities are moving from gyms, sport fields, and parks to living rooms. The window view is becoming a key feature of apartments and houses, with people looking for comfort in the landscape visible directly from their homes—now turned into offices. Meanwhile, cities around the world are introducing temporary (“tactical”) public space interventions in preparation for post-lockdown urban life. This may include, but is not limited to, the extension of footpaths, widening of bike lanes, closures of some streets (providing new, extended “meeting grounds”) and improvement in the quality of public sanitary facilities. The area of urban planning and design is facing a grand challenge to seek new solutions and answer questions on the alternative use of specific spaces and their public/private character. In countries that have experienced severe lockdowns, private spaces such as balconies and terraces have become places for public meetings and allotment gardens have become places of refuge as “enclaves” of green private and “safe” space in the urban environment. In cities that have enforced a “stay local” policy, neighbourhood parks and their accessibility have become vital, as long distance (car) travel for recreation is not allowed. Large open green spaces, urban forests, and some green wasteland (Informal Green Spaces) seem to be the safest places in the city due to the possibility of social distancing.