Bruce D Patterson

Bruce D Patterson
Field Museum of Natural History · Negaunee Integrative Research Center

B.S., M.S., PhD

About

354
Publications
229,154
Reads
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15,698
Citations
Citations since 2016
118 Research Items
7632 Citations
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201620172018201920202021202202004006008001,0001,200
201620172018201920202021202202004006008001,0001,200
Introduction
I study biological diversification and the systematics, evolution, and biogeography of tropical mammals at the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago. Much of my work is specimen based, originating in fieldwork in South America and Africa. I also teach and advise students and visiting scholars at the Field Museum, the University of Chicago, and the University of Illinois at Chicago.
Additional affiliations
January 1989 - May 2022
University of Illinois at Chicago
Position
  • Adjunct Professor (Associate)
August 1986 - May 2022
University of Chicago
Position
  • Member Committee on Evolutionary Biology

Publications

Publications (354)
Article
Full-text available
Phylogenomics of bats suggests that their echolocation either evolved separately in the bat suborders Yinpterochiroptera and Yangochiroptera, or had a single origin in bat ancestors and was later lost in some yinpterochiropterans1–6. Hearing for echolocation behaviour depends on the inner ear, of which the spiral ganglion is an essential structure....
Article
Full-text available
Aim: Comprehensive, global information on species' occurrences is an essential biodiversity variable and central to a range of applications in ecology, evolution, biogeography and conservation. Expert range maps often represent a species' only available distributional information and play an increasing role in conservation assessments and macroeco...
Article
Investigations of phenotypic disparity across geography often ignore macroevolutionary processes. As a corollary, the random null expectations to which disparity is compared and interpreted may be unrealistic. We tackle this issue by representing, in geographical space, distinct processes of phenotypic evolution underlying ecological disparity. Und...
Article
Aim Mountains cover approximately 22% of the planet's terrestrial surface and have dramatic effects on climate and biodiversity. The rain shadow effect is a common feature on mountain ranges worldwide and its effects on ecology and evolution of species, particularly morphology, are incompletely known. Our aim is to identify the correlates that best...
Article
Full-text available
Background The recognition and delineation of morphologically indistinguishable cryptic species can have broad implications for wildlife conservation, disease ecology and accurate estimates of biodiversity. Parasites are intriguing in the study of cryptic speciation because unique evolutionary pressures and diversifying factors are generated by eco...
Article
Asia’s rich species diversity has been linked to its Cenozoic geodiversity, including active mountain building and dramatic climatic changes. However, prior studies on the diversification and assembly of Asian faunas have been derived mainly from analyses at taxonomic or geographic scales too limited to offer a comprehensive view of this complex re...
Preprint
Full-text available
Quantifying animal movements is necessary for answering a wide array of research questions in ecology and conservation biology. Consequently, ecologists have made considerable efforts to identify the best way to estimate an animal’s home range, and many methods of estimating home ranges have arisen over the past half century. Most of these methods...
Article
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Dasyprocta azarae Lichtenstein, 1823 is currently distributed in Argentina, Brazil, and Paraguay, with controversial records in Bolivia. Recent records using trail cameras have expanded its distribution in the Chaco region of Paraguay, but its distribution remains unclear because of its morphological similarity to species in Bolivia and northwester...
Article
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Sri Lanka is considered one of the world's biodiversity hotspots. Although Sri Lanka has a rich diversity of bats, Kerivoula malpasi is the only bat that is endemic to Sri Lanka, where it is represented by only five records. The other known species of Kerivoula in Sri Lanka, Kerivoula picta, is more widely distributed. This study maps the current a...
Article
The genus Miniopterus is a monophyletic assemblage of many species characterized by remarkably conservative morphology. The number of recognized species has more than doubled over the last two decades, mainly with newly recognized Afrotropical and Malagasy species. A molecular phylogenetic analysis based on cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) reve...
Article
Full-text available
Background Previous phylogeographic studies of the lion (Panthera leo) have improved our insight into the distribution of genetic variation, as well as a revised taxonomy which now recognizes a northern (Panthera leo leo) and a southern (Panthera leo melanochaita) subspecies. However, existing whole range phylogeographic studies on lions either con...
Article
Full-text available
We evaluated whether evolution is faster at ecotones as niche shifts may be needed to persist under unstable environment. We mapped diet evolution along the evolutionary history of 350 sigmodontine species. Mapping was used in three new tip-based metrics of trait evolution – Transition Rates, Stasis Time, and Last Transition Time – which were spati...
Article
Bats spend more than half of their life in roosts, where key life events transpire. Therefore the availability and selection of roosts are important to bats everywhere, and may limit their ability to exploit every habitat, including agricultural landscapes such as paddy fields, orchards and tea plantations. This study aimed to investigate the day r...
Preprint
Full-text available
We evaluated whether evolution is faster at ecotones as niche shifts may be needed to persist under unstable environment. We mapped diet evolution along the evolutionary history of 350 sigmodontine species. Mapping was used in three new tip-based metrics of trait evolution–Transition Rates, Stasis Time, and Last Transition Time–which were spatializ...
Article
Marmosops is one of the most speciose genera of didelphid marsupials, is widely distributed in the Neotropical region, and has been the subject of several taxonomic and systematic revisions. Within the genus, the Pinheiroi complex is distributed in eastern Amazonia and recently has been split into three species, based only on morphology. We analyse...
Article
Nycteris madagascariensis is an enigmatic bat species, described as endemic to Madagascar and known only from two century-old specimens. Vigorous recent efforts to document this species on the island have proven unsuccessful. We extracted DNA from the fluid-preserved paratype of this taxon and used high-throughput sequencing methods to recover cyto...
Article
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A brief review of the phylogeny and nomenclature of the weasels, genus Mustela Linnaeus, 1758 in the broad sense, indicates continuing confusion over the appropriate name for the well-supported American clade included within it. A case is made that the American mink (Neovison vison) and three allied species (Mustela frenata, M. felipei, and M. afri...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Bats spend over half of their lives in day roosts, where key life events transpire. Therefore the availability and selection of roosts is important to bats everywhere, and may limit their ability to exploit agricultural landscapes like tea plantations. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the day roosts used by different bat species in tea pl...
Article
During a faunal survey in the foothills of the Ecuadoran Andes southwest of the Cordillera del Cóndor, a mouse of uncertain affinities was taken in a fishing net. Various external characters suggested that it was a member of the genus Rhagomys, previously unrecorded in Ecuador. Comparisons with the external, cranial, and dental morphology both of R...
Article
Aim Bergmann's rule is an ecogeographical rule that describes a negative relationship between body size and temperature. Here, we used a multivariate measure of skull size (centroid size) as a proxy for body size to test the influence of temperature, precipitation, elevation, human influence and competition on size in Dicotyles tajacu and Tayassu p...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Dietary pressures are often reflected in the morphology of the cranial complex of vertebrates. Akodontini rodents present a diverse array of insectivorous species, but the morphological corollaries of this specialization have never been examined. In the present work we quantify mechanical advantages (MA) of akodontine jaws to assess their relations...
Chapter
Tuco-tucos (Ctenomys sp.) are the most speciose genus of octodontoid rodent and are widely distributed in the southern half of South America. Despite their diversity, species of tuco-tucos rarely co-occur in syntopy and most adjacent species pairs are thought to be contiguously allopatric. Greater understanding of their geographic patterns of speci...
Chapter
Full-text available
Bats serve as hosts to many lineages of arthropods, of which the blood-sucking bat flies (Nycteribiidae and Streblidae) are the most conspicuous. Bat flies can in turn be parasitized by Laboulbeniales fungi, which are biotrophs of arthropods. This is a second level of parasitism, hyperparasitism, a severely understudied phenomenon. Four genera of L...
Article
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Sri Lanka is an island lying in the Indian Ocean, southwest of Bengal bay and harbours rich diversity of bats comprising 31 species. The only species of bent-winged bat (Miniopteridae) recorded from Sri Lanka has been identified as Miniopterus fuliginosus, but this name is used with caution. Distribution of this species is documented inaccurately a...
Article
Full-text available
The mandible of vertebrates serves as insertion area for masticatory muscles that originate on the skull, and its functional properties are subject to selective forces related to trophic ecology. The efficiency of masticatory muscles can be measured as mechanical advantage on the mandible, which, in turn, has the property of correlating with bite f...
Chapter
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This engaging account traces the remarkable history of France's first giraffe, a diplomatic gift from Egyptian Pasha Muhammed-Ali to King Charles X in 1826. “Zarafa,” taken by boat from Egypt to Marseilles and walked all the way to Paris, was accompanied by her Arab handlers and a famous French naturalist. She drew vast crowds along her route, spar...
Article
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Rhinonycteridae (trident bats) are a small Palaeotropical family of insectivorous bats allied to Hipposideridae. Their taxonomy has been in a state of flux. Here, we use mitochondrial and nuclear sequences to evaluate species relationships, confirming the monophyly of both Triaenops and Paratriaenops. Although most Triaenops afer specimens are reco...
Article
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Vespertilionidae (class Mammalia) constitutes the largest family of bats, with ~500 described species. Nonetheless, the systematic relationships within this family are poorly known, especially among the pipistrelle-like bats of the tribes Vespertilionini and Pipistrellini. Perhaps as a result of their drab pelage and lack of obvious morphological c...
Article
Full-text available
Vespertilionidae (class Mammalia) constitutes the largest family of bats, with ~500 described species. Nonetheless, the systematic relationships within this family are poorly known, especially among the pipistrelle-like bats of the tribes Vespertilionini and Pipistrellini. Perhaps as a result of their drab pelage and lack of obvious morphological c...
Article
Full-text available
Accurately quantifying species’ area requirements is a prerequisite for effective area‐based conservation. This typically involves collecting tracking data on species of interest and then conducting home‐range analyses. Problematically, autocorrelation in tracking data can result in space needs being severely underestimated. Based on previous work,...
Article
Full-text available
The Old World leaf-nosed bats (Hipposideridae) are aerial and gleaning insectivores that occur throughout the Paleotropics. Both their taxonomic and phylogenetic histories are confused. Until recently, the family included genera now allocated to the Rhinonycteridae and was recognized as a subfamily of Rhinolophidae. Evidence that Hipposideridae div...
Article
The staggering diversity of biological systems demands accurate identification of its components, and species represent ecological and historical units that are central to all sorts of biological understanding. Problems of species identification exist everywhere, but these only increase in the tropics, given pronounced latitudinal diversity gradien...
Article
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High phenotypic diversity is an intrinsic attribute of successful invaders, but remains poorly studied. Here, we investigate the role of phenotypic traits in biological invasions using one of the few Neotropical mammal lineages that has successfully invaded the Nearctic, the nine-banded armadillo Dasypus novemcinctus. Specifically, we analyzed cran...
Article
Full-text available
Iran is home to three genera and four species of hedgehogs in the family Erinaceidae. One of these, Paraechinus hypomelas, is known to occur in Fars Province. In the present study, we report two new distribution records of the Long-eared Hedgehog, Hemiechinus auritus from the southwestern region of Fars Province (Varavi Mountain in Mohr and Lamerd...
Article
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Stable isotope analyses are frequently used to study trophic interactions, diet, and community processes, but they have seldom been applied to investigate the trophic niche structure of entire clades. In this paper, we assess stable isotopes information in a phylogenetic context to evaluate trophic evolution across the phylogeny of a diversified gr...
Article
Necromys is a genus of sigmodontine rodent that inhabits grasslands and scrublands in South America. Eight extant species are recognized in the genus; one of these is Necromys lactens, which inhabits high-elevation grasslands in the Yungas from south-central Bolivia to northwestern Argentina. Morphological variation in N. lactens has been recognize...
Article
Full-text available
Recent studies of mammalian microbiomes have identified strong phylogenetic effects on bacterial community composition. Bats (Mammalia: Chiroptera) are among the most speciose mammals on the planet and the only mammal capable of true flight. We examined 1,236 16S rRNA amplicon libraries of the gut, oral, and skin microbiota from 497 Afrotropical ba...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Sri Lanka is known to support 31 species of bats representing 8 families. The family Hipposideridae includes five species in Sri Lanka, currently identified as Hipposideros speoris, Hipposideros ater, Hipposideros fulvus, Hipposideros galeritus, and Hipposideros lankadiva. Detailed descriptions of echolocation calls of most bat species in Sri Lanka...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract The Old World bat family Miniopteridae comprises only the genus Miniopterus, which includes 20 currently recognized species from the Afrotropical realm and 15 species from Eurasia and Australasia. Since 2003, the number of recognized Miniopterus species has grown from 19 to 35, with most newly described species endemic to Madagascar and th...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract The Old World bat family Miniopteridae comprises only the genus Miniopterus, which includes 20 currently recognized species from the Afrotropical realm and 15 species from Eurasia and Australasia. Since 2003, the number of recognized Miniopterus species has grown from 19 to 35, with most newly described species endemic to Madagascar and th...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background Previous phylogeographic studies of the lion ( Panthera leo ) have improved our insight into the distribution of genetic variation, as well as a revised taxonomy which now recognizes a northern ( Panthera leo leo ) and a southern ( Panthera leo melanochaita ) subspecies. However, existing whole range phylogeographic studies on lions eith...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
We explored the mode of evolution of cranial shape and size of the Akodontini, a group of highly diversified Sigmodontinae rodents, using branch patterns and diet to test different evolutionary scenarios. The shape of the skull was assessed by geometric morphometrics of the lateral view of the skull of 607 adult specimens belonging to 59 species, u...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Stable isotopes record natural processes, measuring assimilated components that leave intrinsic signatures on organic tissues. They are frequently used to study trophic interactions, resource consumption and community processes, but applied less often in a macroevolutionary context. The Akodontini, the second most diverse among sigmodontine rodents...
Article
Full-text available
Background The Old World insectivorous bat genus Rhinolophus is highly speciose. Over the last 15 years, the number of its recognized species has grown from 77 to 106, but knowledge of their interrelationships has not kept pace. Species limits and phylogenetic relationships of this morphologically conservative group remain problematic due both to...
Article
Full-text available
The bat family Nycteridae contains only the genus Nycteris, which comprises 13 currently recognized species from Africa and the Arabian Peninsula, one species from Madagascar, and two species restricted to Malaysia and Indonesia in South‐East Asia. We investigated genetic variation, clade membership, and phylogenetic relationships in Nycteridae wit...
Article
Full-text available
Habitat loss and fragmentation are major threats to biodiversity worldwide, and little is known about their effects on bats in Africa. We investigated effects of forest fragmentation on bat assemblages at Kakamega Forest, western Kenya, examining captures at edge and interior locations in three forest fragments (Buyangu, 3950 ha; Kisere, 400 ha; an...
Article
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We describe the echolocation calls of six species of Hipposideridae: Doryrhina camerunensis, Hipposideros beatus, H. caffer, H. ruber, Macronycteris gigas, and M. vittata and two species of Rhinonycteridae: Cloeotis percivali and Triaenops afer. The recordings were made in Kenya during 2013-2018, using Pettersson D500X and D1000X real time, full sp...
Article
The armadillo genus Dasypus is the most species-rich and widely distributed genus of the order Cingulata and it has a dynamic taxonomic history. Recent morphology-based studies have proposed new taxonomic arrangements, but these were not yet assessed with molecular data. The two comprehensive phylogenetic hypotheses available for the genus are conf...
Article
The genus Myotis is nearly cosmopolitan and the second-most speciose genus of mammals, but its Afrotropical members are few and poorly known. We analyzed phylogenetic and phylogeographic relationships of six of the eight known Afrotropical species using Cytb and sequences from four nuclear introns. Using Bayesian and maximum-likelihood approaches t...
Article
Full-text available
Ctenomys dorsalis is known only from its type specimen, a female preserved as skin without skull (except for the upper incisors) from an imprecise locality in the “Northern Chaco of Paraguay”. Here, we report additional individuals of this species housed, since the 1940s, at the Field Museum of Natural History (Chicago, USA). Based on these specime...
Article
A primary requirement of the mammalian skull is to exert forces on different foods and to resist the forces imposed on it during feeding. Skull shape patterns within and among mammals are generally well known, but the biomechanical relevance of this variation remains limited for some groups. By integrating geometric morphometric and biomechanical a...
Article
Full-text available
Due to the exponential growth of human population, natural forests are being steadily replaced by areas devoted to agriculture. It is estimated that forty percent of our planet's terrestrial area is allocated to agriculture, causing devastating damage to wildlife. However, on the positive side, the diverse nature of agro-ecosystems offers opportuni...
Article
Full-text available
We present the results of an inventory of small mammals in the Mayo River basin, one of the least-studied regions of the Central Andes in Peru. We conducted inventories at three locations in May 2007. We collected 47 species of small mammals in the study area: five marsupials, 31 bats, and 11 rodents. A new species of Sturnira was encountered and i...