Brototi Roy

Brototi Roy
University of Antwerp | UA · Institute of Development Policy

Doctor of Philosophy

About

17
Publications
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Introduction
Brototi Roy is based at the Institute of Environmental Science and Technology, Autonomous University of Barcelona (ICTA-UAB). She does research on Political Ecology and Ecological Economics with a focus on environmental distribution conflicts in India. Her current project is '“ENVJUSTICE” - Global Environmental Justice Movement (ERC Grant)'.

Publications

Publications (17)
Article
Full-text available
The advance of renewable energy around the world has kindled hopes that coal-based energy is on the way out. Recent data, however, make it clear that growing coal consumption in India coupled with its continued use in China keeps coal-based energy at 40 percent of the world’s heat and power generation. To address the consolidation of coal-based pow...
Article
Full-text available
In this article we undertake a systematic mapping of 649 cases of resistance movements to both fossil fuel (FF) and low carbon energy (LCE) projects, providing the most comprehensive overview of such place-based energy-related mobilizations to date. We find that (1) Place-based resistance movements are succeeding in curbing both fossil-fuel and low...
Article
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Coal is on the rise in India: despite the devasting impacts of the climate crisis, the awareness for land and forest rights, and political talk of a coal phase-out. In this article, we demonstrate that despite the renewables-led rhetoric, India is in the midst of a transition to (not away from) greater use of coal in its fossil energy system and in...
Article
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Recent research and policies recognize the importance of environmental defenders for global sustainability and emphasize their need for protection against violence and repression. However, effective support may benefit from a more systematic understanding of the underlying environmental conflicts, as well as from better knowledge on the factors tha...
Article
Research by ecological economists on degrowth is a flourishing field. Existing research has focused on limits to (green) growth and on economic alternatives for prospering without growth. Future research, we argue here, should pay more attention to, and be written, from the “margins” – that is from the point of view of those marginalized in the gro...
Article
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With each passing year, defending land and water, livelihoods and cultures appears to become more violent. Against the alarming number of murders of environmental activists or environmental defenders, which is the easiest way to recognize violence, this article aims to analyse other visible and invisible ways in which violence is manifested. Using...
Article
Cet article présente une revue des mouvements de justice environnementale en Inde, à partir d’une combinaison d’informations provenant de l’Atlas de la justice environnementale (EJAtlas), de travaux de terrain et d’une analyse de la littérature secondaire. L’auteur souligne ici l’intensité des conflits, les armes judiciaires qui confortent les mani...
Poster
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The underlying question that this poster tries to answer is who, how and why do communities resist coal mining and thermal power plants by analyzing 23 case studies of environmental justice movements against coal in the four largest coal bearing states of India, as reported in the Environmental Justice Atlas.
Article
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Environmental justice activism is to this age what the workers’ movement was for the industrial age - one of the most influential social movements of its time. Yet, despite its consistent progress since the 1970s, environmental justice protests seem to get lost in the morass of information on broader environmental issues. In contrast, labour confl...
Poster
Full-text available
This poster analyses 70 cases of fossil fuels conflicts using the EJAtlas featured map to understand the motivations, methods and alliances for Blockadia actions for climate justice globally.

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
The project will expand the Environmental Justice Atlas (EJAtlas), a worldwide inventory of ecological distribution conflicts. The initiative will analyze the alliance between the Global Environmental Justice Movement and the Degrowth movement in Europe. Is there a Global Movement for Environmental Justice helping to push society and economy towards environmental sustainability? The project “ENVJUSTICE” led by ICTA-UAB researcher Joan Martinez Alier will try to prove there is through research on the many facets of this Global Movement for Environmental Justice. The project will be possible thanks to an Advanced Grant from the European Research Council (ERC) awarded to Joan Martinez Alier with a fund of nearly €2 million. This is the most prestigious grant awarded by ERC, and it is designed to allow outstanding research leaders of any nationality and age to pursue groundbreaking, high-risk projects in Europe. ENVJUSTICE will carry out three main tasks. First, the team will add and analyze cases in a groundbreaking Environmental Justice Atlas (EJAtlas) (www.ejatlas.org), a worldwide inventory of ecological distribution conflicts compiled at the ICTA-UAB, still with uneven coverage. Researchers will update and expand the EJAtlas which was launched in March 2014 as part of the EJOLT project (www.ejolt.org). It will grow thematically and geographically, becoming a unique instrument to conduct comparative, statistical political ecology. The field of political ecology studies “ecological distribution conflicts” ultimately caused by the increase in social metabolism. The links between such socio-environmental conflicts and changes in the social metabolism will be explored. “Even a non-growing industrial economy would require new supplies of fossil fuels and other materials from the commodity extraction frontiers because energy is not recycled and materials are recycled only in part”, says Martinez Alier who adds that the economy is not circular, but entropic “there are therefore many resource extraction and waste disposal conflicts, at different scales, such as greenhouse gases”. Research based on the EJAtlas will analyze the resistance movements born from such conflicts and the networks they form across borders in a Global Environmental Justice Movement. The project will try to provide answers to questions such as: Who are the social actors and victims in such conflicts, the forms of mobilization, the variables explaining the rates of “success” in creating new alternatives? In this regard, ENVJUSTICE will work together with the project Acknowl-EJ led by Dr Leah Temper (2016-19) at ICTA-UAB and funded by the ISSC (www.worldsocialscience.org/activities/transformations/acknowl-ej/). Second, it shall expand the scope and deepen the analysis of the Vocabulary of the Movement for Environmental Justice, from its beginning in the United States in 1982 (with terms like environmental racism, popular epidemiology, sacrifice zones) to its deployment in many countries with new crosscutting concepts. In Paris in 2015 (at the 21st COP on Climate Change) there were claims for “Climate Justice”. This is only one of many terms in the vocabulary of environmental justice. The project will investigate how different claims are expressed in Europe, India, China, Africa, Latin America, related to mining and fossil fuel extraction conflicts, biomass and water, waste disposal and transport conflicts. Third, it shall analyze (following in the steps of Sicco Mansholt and Nicholas Georgescu-Roegen) the elements for a possible alliance between the Global Environmental Justice movement and the smaller Degrowth (Décroissance, Post-Wachstum, “Prosperity without Growth”) movement in Europe. ENVJUSTICE reinforces the Ecological Economics and Political Ecology group at ICTA-UAB, the so called "Barcelona school".