Brooke Erin Crowley

Brooke Erin Crowley
University of Cincinnati | UC · Geology and Anthropology

BA, MS, MA, PhD

About

111
Publications
21,005
Reads
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2,085
Citations
Citations since 2016
55 Research Items
1681 Citations
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20162017201820192020202120220100200300
20162017201820192020202120220100200300
20162017201820192020202120220100200300
Introduction
Brooke Erin Crowley is an Associate Professor in the departments of Geology and Anthropology at the University of Cincinnati.
Additional affiliations
September 2011 - May 2017
University of Cincinnati
Position
  • Professor
August 2011 - May 2017
University of Cincinnati
Position
  • Professor
September 2009 - May 2011
University of Toronto
Position
  • Postdoctoral Researcher, Sessional Lecturer

Publications

Publications (111)
Article
Full-text available
Under harsh Pleistocene climates, migration and other forms of seasonally patterned landscape use were likely critical for reproductive success of mastodons ( Mammut americanum ) and other megafauna. However, little is known about how their geographic ranges and mobility fluctuated seasonally or changed with sexual maturity. We used a spatially exp...
Article
We present eight new radiocarbon dates for endemic and invasive rodents from Trouing Jérémie #5, a paleontologically-rich sink hole on the Tiburon Peninsula, Haiti. This includes new dates for two species that have been previously directly dated ( Isolobodon portoricensis and Brotomys voratus) as well as three endemic rodents which have no previous...
Article
Full-text available
The Ancestral Puebloans occupied Chaco Canyon, in what is now the southwestern USA, for more than a millennium and harvested useful timber and fuel from the trees of distant for�ests as well as local woodlands, especially juniper and pinyon pine. These pinyon juniper woodland products were an essential part of the resource base from Late Archaic ti...
Article
Full-text available
The Ancestral Puebloans occupied Chaco Canyon, in what is now the southwestern USA, for more than a millennium and harvested useful timber and fuel from the trees of distant forests as well as local woodlands, especially juniper and pinyon pine. These pinyon juniper woodland products were an essential part of the resource base from Late Archaic tim...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding seasonal mobility, population connectivity, and site fidelity is critical for managing and preserving migratory species. We investigated the potential of coupling strontium (87Sr/86Sr) and hydrogen (δ2H) isotopes in feathers for quantitatively constraining natal origin for juvenile migratory predatory birds (raptors) using a probabili...
Article
Full-text available
Nearly four decades after the first applications of strontium isotope analyses in archaeology and paleoecology research, it could be said that we are entering a “Golden Age”. Here, we reflect on major past developments and current strengths in strontium isotope research, as well as speculate on future directions. We review (1) the currently limited...
Article
Full-text available
Madagascar experienced a major faunal turnover near the end of the first millenium CE that particularly affected terrestrial, large-bodied vertebrate species. Teasing apart the relative impacts of people and climate on this event requires a focus on regional records with good chronological control. These records may document coeval changes in rainf...
Article
Full-text available
Recently expanded estimates for when humans arrived on Madagascar (up to approximately 10 000 years ago) highlight questions about the causes of the island's relatively late megafaunal extinctions (approximately 2000-500 years ago). Introduced domesticated animals could have contributed to extinctions, but the arrival times and past diets of exotic...
Article
Full-text available
Significance Based on “subfossil” skeletal remains it is known that multiple now-extinct giant lemur (primate) species with estimated body masses of up to ∼160 kg survived on Madagascar into the past millennium. In this study, we used ancient DNA methods to sequence the nuclear genome of one of these megafaunal lemurs, Megaladapis edwardsi (∼85 kg)...
Article
Full-text available
Introduced predators currently threaten endemic animals on Madagascar through predation, facilitation of human-led hunts, competition, and disease transmission, but the antiquity and past consequences of these introductions are poorly known. We use directly radiocarbon dated bones of introduced dogs (Canis familiaris) to test whether dogs could hav...
Article
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Accumulations of shed caribou antlers (Rangifer tarandus) are valuable resources for expanding the temporal scope with which we evaluate seasonal landscape use of herds. Female caribou shed their antlers within days of giving birth, thus marking calving ground locations. Antler geochemistry ( ⁸⁷ Sr/ ⁸⁶ Sr) reflects the isotopic signature of regions...
Article
Tenerife Island is well-known for its biodiversity. It boasts the highest elevation in the Atlantic Ocean and its northern and southern slopes have varying moisture and temperature gradients. Consequently, there are multiple spatially discrete vegetation zones, or biomes, recognized on the island that roughly follow elevation. We investigated the e...
Preprint
Full-text available
No endemic Madagascar animal with body mass >10 kg survived a relatively recent wave of extinction on the island. From morphological and isotopic analyses of skeletal ‘subfossil’ remains we can reconstruct some of the biology and behavioral ecology of giant lemurs (primates; up to ~160 kg), elephant birds (up to ~860 kg), and other extraordinary Ma...
Poster
Full-text available
Tenerife, the largest and most biodiverse of the Canary Islands, has six ecologically unique biomes that roughly follow elevation along its northern (windward) and southern (leeward) slopes. Moving downslope, these are peak ecosystem, summit scrub, pine forest, broad-leaved evergreen forest, thermophilous woodlands, and sub-desert coastal scrub. Th...
Article
Full-text available
Researchers typically assume constant fur and hair growth for primates, but the few studies that have investigated growth explicitly suggest this may not be the case. Instead, growth may vary considerably among individuals and across seasons. One might expect this variability to be most pronounced for species that have seasonally variable activity...
Article
Full-text available
Strontium isotope ratios (⁸⁷Sr/⁸⁶Sr) are a popular tool in provenance applications in archeology, forensics, paleoecology, and environmental sciences. Using bioavailable ⁸⁷Sr/⁸⁶Sr in provenance studies requires comparing the ⁸⁷Sr/⁸⁶Sr of a sample of interest to that of ⁸⁷Sr/⁸⁶Sr baselines. Historically, these baselines required building empirical d...
Article
Full-text available
Among mammals, including anthropoid primates, the primary factors that affect mobility are body size (larger-bodied species move more than smaller ones), diet (frugivores and trophic omnivores are more mobile than folivores), and habit (terrestrial taxa have larger home ranges than arboreal ones). If similar factors hold for Lemuriformes, we would...
Article
A new fossil site in a previously unexplored part of western Madagascar (the Beanka Protected Area) has yielded remains of many recently extinct vertebrates, including giant lemurs (Babakotia radofilai, Palaeopropithecus kelyus, Pachylemur sp., and Archaeolemur edwardsi), carnivores (Cryptoprocta spelea), the aardvark-like Plesiorycteropus sp., and...
Article
The timing of the human settlement of Madagascar, one of the last large landmasses to be settled by people, remains a key topic of debate in archaeology. Despite decades of research, recent estimates for initial settlement are increasingly divergent and span ca. 9000 years: the widest colonization window for any island within the reliable range of...
Article
Faecal isotopic analysis may complement other non-invasive wildlife survey tools for monitoring landscape use by carnivores, such as motion-detecting cameras and non-invasive genetic sampling. We analysed carbon, nitrogen, and strontium isotopes in faecal matter produced by jaguars (Panthera onca) as well as bones from consumed prey at the Mountain...
Article
Madagascar is a complex ‘biodiversity hotspot’ with a rapidly dwindling biota. The Late Quaternary subfossil record includes many extinct species whose loss is attributed to natural climate change and human impacts. Investigation of the chronology of these events is challenging because few localities document pre‐Holocene communities not impacted b...
Article
Coastal proximity, wind direction, and amount of precipitation can all influence the distribution of marine sulfur on land. However, the relative importance of these different factors to vegetation is not well constrained, and previous research has been geographically limited. Here we use sulfur isotope (δ³⁴S) values for total sulfur in foliage to...
Article
Full-text available
We used carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotopes to examine the foraging ecology of Tenerife giant rats (Canariomys bravoi) and lizards (Gallotia goliath) in northwestern Tenerife, which until recently, were the island’s largest terrestrial vertebrates. We combined new isotope data for 28 C. bravoi and 14 G. goliath with published regional data f...
Article
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Human societies depend on an Earth system that operates within a constrained range of nutrient availability, yet the recent trajectory of terrestrial nitrogen (N) availability is uncertain. Examining patterns of foliar N concentrations and isotope ratios (δ15N) from more than 43,000 samples acquired over 37 years, here we show that foliar N concent...
Article
Most endemic species with body masses >10 kg on Madagascar went extinct within the past 1000 years. The extent to which human predation, anthropogenic landscape transformation and aridification may separately or together explain this extinction pattern remains controversial. We present nitrogen isotope (δ¹⁵N) values of individual amino acids preser...
Article
Despite extensive research on the evolutionary history and ecology of horses, surprisingly little is known about the daily and seasonal movements (i.e. mobility) of extinct species. We used strontium isotope ratios (⁸⁷Sr/⁸⁶Sr) in tooth enamel to estimate mobility patterns of equids from two Miocene fossil sites in northern Florida, USA: Thomas Farm...
Article
Hispaniola once had a large and diverse endemic rodent community. Today, a single species, Plagiodontia aedium, survives alongside invasive murids. Ecological adaptations and resource competition among species have not been previously studied. Here, we undertake the first investigation of the foraging ecology of the endemic taxa using estimated bod...
Article
Full-text available
The Pueblo population of Chaco Canyon during the Bonito Phase (AD 800–1130) employed agricultural strategies and water-management systems to enhance food cultivation in this unpredictable environment. Scepticism concerning the timing and effectiveness of this system, however, remains common. Using optically stimulated luminescence dating of sedimen...
Article
Full-text available
We applied a multi-isotope approach to examine aspects of niche partitioning, competition, and mobility for rodents in the Central Highlands of Madagascar. Specifically, we used carbon (δ13C), nitrogen (δ15N), and strontium (87Sr/86Sr) isotope ratios in bone to investigate diet and mobility for endemic tufted tail rats (Eliurus spp.), and introduce...
Article
Full-text available
Questions about how archaeological populations obtained basic food supplies are often difficult to answer. The application of specialist techniques from non-archaeological fields typically expands our knowledge base, but can be detrimental to cultural interpretations if employed incorrectly, resulting in problematic datasets and erroneous conclusio...
Data
S1_Supplemental table. Compilation of Chaco Canyon soil salinity data broken out by researcher into separate tabs. All relevant conversions are applied with original equations and sources noted. (XLSX)
Data
S1_Supplemental Notes. Notes related on sample process handling, data interpretation, or relevant but specific details of original publications. (DOCX)
Article
Apex predators play critical roles in the ecosystems they inhabit. Unfortunately, little is known about movement patterns for many species. This information is critical for evaluating vulnerability to habitat loss and the adequacy of existing or proposed protected areas. Strontium isotope ratios (87Sr/86Sr) in prey remains reflect the geology where...
Article
Isotopic analysis of zoological material in archaeological deposits may help identify the origin of predated individuals. Here we assess the utility of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur isotope values in bone collagen from zooarchaeological remains for determining the degree to which prehistoric Trinidadians relied on terrestrial prey from coastal and i...
Article
Full-text available
Most studies on roadside soil pollution have been performed in areas where petrol is the main fuel. Very little work has been conducted in regions where diesel predominates. We collected soil samples from four sites that span a precipitation gradient along the Manali-Leh Highway in northwestern Himalaya, India. This road traverses rough terrain and...
Chapter
Stable isotope ecology is a geochemical technique for interpreting a wide range of research questions related to primate diets, foraging strategies, and life histories, as well as niche partitioning, habitat characteristics, and environmental conditions for living and extinct ecological communities. Isotopic data complement data obtained via observ...
Article
Full-text available
Strontium (Sr) isotope analysis can provide detailed biogeographical and ecological information about modern and ancient organisms. Because Sr isotope ratios (87Sr/86Sr) in biologically relevant materials such as water, soil, vegetation, and animal tissues predominantly reflect local geology, they can be used to distinguish geologically distinct re...
Article
Full-text available
Evidence of historic predation is important to understand the role that predators play in molding fundamental aspects of primate biology. We examined the geographic demise of Prolemur simus from the perspective of its past behavioral ecology. Using paleontological data from the Late Pleistocene–Holocene deposits at Ankarana Massif, northern Madagas...
Chapter
Full-text available
The dwarf and mouse lemurs of Madagascar are two very species-rich lemur genera, yet there is a relative paucity of information on this primate family in published literature. In this first ever treatment of the Cheirogaleidae, international experts are brought together to review and integrate our current knowledge of the behaviour, physiology, eco...
Article
Full-text available
Researchers are divided about the relative importance of people versus climate in triggering the Late Holocene extinctions of the endemic large-bodied fauna on the island of Madagascar. Specifically, a dramatic and synchronous decline in arboreal pollen and increase in grass pollen ca 1000 yr ago has been alternatively interpreted as evidence for a...
Article
Stable isotope values in primate tissues can be used to reconstruct diet in the absence of direct observation. However, in order to make dietary inferences, one must first establish isotopic variability for potential food sources. In this study we examine stable carbon isotope (δ(13) C) values for chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) food resources from tw...
Conference Paper
Chitinous remains of arthropods have been shown to retain their original elemental composition in the fossil record, but the paleoecological utility of these compounds is unknown. In this study, we test for the first time the integrity of stable carbon isotope signatures (δ13C) in the organic remains of Mesozoic-age fossil decapod arthropod cuticle...
Article
Stable isotope biogeochemistry has been used to investigate foraging ecology in non-human primates for nearly 30 years. Whereas early studies focused on diet, more recently, isotopic analysis has been used to address a diversity of ecological questions ranging from niche partitioning to nutritional status to variability in life history traits. With...
Article
Full-text available
Geoheritage sites with palaeogeographical value are excellent venues for geotourism. These sites preserve information about ancient environments, ecosystems, and their dynamics that may be of interest to professionals, students, amateur scientists, and the general public. Palaeogeographical geoheritage sites (geosites) can be used to successfully i...
Article
Full-text available
Over 40 years ago, Clifford Jolly noted different ways in which Hadropithecus stenognathus converged in its craniodental anatomy with basal hominins and with geladas. The Malagasy subfossil lemur Hadropithecus departs from its sister taxon, Archaeolemur, in that it displays comparatively large molars, reduced incisors and canines, a shortened rostr...
Article
Full-text available
Stable isotope data provide insight into the foraging ecology of animals. Traditionally, carbon and nitrogen isotope values have been used to infer dietary and habitat preferences. Oxygen isotopes are used less frequently but may complement the ecological information provided by carbon and nitrogen, particularly in densely forested or arid environm...
Article
Big Bone Lick (BBL) in northern Kentucky, USA has been a critical geologic site in the historical development of North American Quaternary vertebrate paleontology since the 1700s. Sedimentology, geoarcheology, paleontology, accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon and optically stimulated luminescence dating, and stable carbon and nitrogen isotope...
Article
Stable oxygen isotopes are increasingly used in ecological research. Here, I present oxygen isotope (δ(18)O) values for bone carbonate and collagen from howler monkeys (Alouatta palliata), spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi) and capuchins (Cebus capucinus) from three localities in Costa Rica. There are apparent differences in δ(18)Ocarbonate and δ(18...