Bronwyn May Gillanders

Bronwyn May Gillanders
University of Adelaide · Environment Institute

PhD

About

304
Publications
83,748
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
14,882
Citations

Publications

Publications (304)
Article
Spatially large and multiple use coastal regions face unprecedented pressures. Decision makers need to build policy that links social, economic and ecological dimensions in ways that build the adaptive capacity of these systems while not compromising individual values. This paper reports on an inter-disciplinary project that used a Capitals approac...
Book
Full-text available
Australians hold a deep affinity for our oceans and coasts. These areas are beautiful, diverse, complex places that work in synchronicity with each other. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have known this for thousands of years, speaking of Land and Sea Country as an interconnected whole, rather than as separate ecosystems. This is what...
Article
Full-text available
Many sharks and other marine taxa use natal areas to maximize survival of young, meaning such areas are often attributed conservation value. The use of natal areas is often linked to predator avoidance or food resources. However, energetic constraints that may influence dispersal of young and their use of natal areas are poorly understood. We combi...
Article
Element-to-calcium ratios of bivalve shells are potentially useful proxies for environmental change, provided the relationship between the environmental variable and element ratio are calibrated using modern specimens. In this study we investigate the utility of trace elemental ratios in the estuarine micromollusc Arthritica helmsi as (palaeo)envir...
Article
We screened for the presence of 66 different pharmaceutical residues in surface waters and in multiple invertebrate and fish species of the Tejo estuary to produce an environmental risk assessment of individual pharmaceuticals and their mixtures, as well as evaluate the bioaccumulation of pharmaceuticals in one of Europe’s largest estuarine systems...
Article
Full-text available
Human activities put stress on our oceans and with a growing global population, the impact is increasing. Stressors rarely act in isolation, with the majority of marine areas being impacted by multiple, concurrent stressors. Marine spatial cumulative impact assessments attempt to estimate the collective impact of multiple stressors on marine enviro...
Article
Sclerochronological approaches using fish otoliths provide a powerful and cost-effective means to evaluate fish responses to environmental variations in regions where there is a paucity of long-term data. We hypothesised that the dynamism in the environmental conditions associated with El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events in the Southern Atla...
Article
Previous studies have shown that accumulation of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in the tissues of aquatic species is highly variable. Movement and migration patterns in these species represent an important consideration when evaluating contaminant accumulation in exposed biota, and may have a large influence on the risk profiles for migratory seafood...
Article
Full-text available
Prompted by the urgency of the situation, 111 aquatic-science societies — representing more than 80,000 scientists from 7 continents — have issued a statement on how anthropogenic climate change is affecting marine and freshwater ecosystems, with a plea to avoid their further degradation and to speed mitigation (see go.nature.com/2lq9zma). This ye...
Article
Aim Climate change is redistributing species globally, resulting in altered community structures and ecosystem functioning. The current paradigm is that species should track temperature isoclines along latitudinal and depth gradients to remain within their thermal niches. However, the many exceptions to this rule point to complex ecological and env...
Article
Full-text available
Determining the geographic range of widely dispersed or migratory marine organisms is notoriously difficult, often requiring considerable costs and typically extensive tagging or exploration programs. While these approaches are accurate and can reveal important information on the species, they are usually conducted on only a small number of individ...
Article
Local carbonate cycling in lagoon-estuarine systems, involving processes such as inorganic and biogenic carbonate precipitation/ dissolution, represents an important but poorly constrained component of the coastal carbon budget. This study investigates the sensitivity of stable Sr isotope tracer (δ88/86Sr) with respect to carbonate saturation and s...
Article
1. Climate change is altering the latitudinal distributions of species, with their capacity to keep pace with a shifting climate depending on the stochastic expression of population growth rates, and the influence of compensatory density feedback on age-specific survival rates. We use population-abundance time series at the leading edge of an expan...
Article
Full-text available
Horizon scanning is an increasingly common strategy to identify key research needs and frame future agendas in science. Here, we present the results of the first such exercise for the field of sclerochronology, thereby providing an overview of persistent and emergent research questions that should be addressed by future studies. Through online corr...
Article
Coastal estuaries provide essential juvenile habitat for many commercially and recreationally important fish, which may move between estuarine and coastal environments throughout their life. Identifying the most important estuarine nurseries that contribute to the broader stock can support targeted management of juvenile and spawning populations. T...
Article
Many demersal marine fish species depend on a dispersive larval stage that connects geographically discrete sub‐populations. Understanding connectivity between these sub‐populations is necessary to determine stock structure, which identifies the appropriate spatial scale for fishery management. Such connectivity is poorly understood for King George...
Article
Full-text available
The illegal pet trade facilitates the global dispersal of invasive alien species (IAS), providing opportunities for new pests to establish in novel recipient environments. Despite the increasing threat of IAS to the environment and economy, biosecurity efforts often lack suitable, scientifically-based methods to make effective management decisions,...
Article
Full-text available
Humans are placing more strain on the world’s oceans than ever before. Furthermore, marine ecosystems are seldom subjected to single stressors, rather they are frequently exposed to multiple, concurrent stressors. When the combined effect of these stressors is calculated and mapped through cumulative impact assessments, it is often assumed that the...
Article
Full-text available
Variations in otolith elemental composition are widely used to reconstruct fish movements. However, reconstructing habitat use and environmental histories of fishes within estuaries is still a major challenge due to the dynamic nature of these coastal environments. In this study, we performed a laboratory experiment to investigate the effects of va...
Technical Report
Spencer Gulf is a region of high economic and cultural importance to South Australia. It was the focus of a broad attempt to establish ecosystem-based management of the State’s coastal, estuarine and marine environments in the early 2000s. This initiative resulted in the Living Coast Strategy and Marine Planning Framework for South Australia, but n...
Article
Full-text available
Climatic effects on the growth of apex marine predators – such as sharks – are poorly understood; moreover, shifts in shark growth are primarily attributed to fishing pressure. This paucity of information impedes management and conservation planning for these taxa. Using vertebral increment patterning as a proxy of somatic growth, this study recons...
Article
Full-text available
Metabolic rate underpins our understanding of how species survive, reproduce and interact with their environment, but can be difficult to measure in wild fish. Stable carbon isotopes (δ13C) in ear stones (otoliths) of fish may reflect lifetime metabolic signatures but experimental validation is required to advance our understanding of the relations...
Article
Full-text available
Mangroves provide many ecosystem services including a considerable capacity to sequester and store large amounts of carbon, both in the sediment and in the above-ground biomass. Assessment of mangrove above-ground carbon stock relies on accurate measurement of tree biomass, which traditionally involves collecting direct measurements from trees and...
Article
Full-text available
Seagrass, saltmarsh and mangrove habitats are declining around the world as anthropogenic activity and climate change intensify. To be able to effectively restore and maintain healthy coastal-vegetation communities, we must understand how and why they have changed in the past. Identifying shifts in vegetation communities, and the environmental or h...
Article
Full-text available
Otolith (ear stone) chemistry provides powerful insights into the lives of fish. Although frequently used to reconstruct past environments, the influence of physiology remains unsettled. As such, we investigated the relationships between otolith chemistry, physiological factors and environmental factors in an iconic fishery species, snapper (Chryso...
Article
Changing climate is forcing many terrestrial and marine species to extend their ranges poleward to stay within the bounds of their thermal tolerances. However, when such species enter higher latitude ecosystems, they engage in novel interactions with local species, such as altered predator–prey dynamics and competition for food. Here, we evaluate t...
Article
Full-text available
Lay summary It is poorly understood whether fish can acclimate to prolonged low-oxygen conditions (or hypoxia). Our study shows that prior long-term exposure to low-oxygen conditions improves tolerance to low-oxygen in a freshwater fish. The results of our study aid our understanding of long-term responses of freshwater fish to low-oxygen to hypoxi...
Article
Full-text available
The life cycles of many marine species depend on a dispersive larval stage that connects spatially segregated populations. However, quantifying larval movement among populations remains one of the greatest challenges in marine ecology. Such movement determines whether a population is essentially a self-recruiting stock, or if it forms part of a lar...
Article
Full-text available
Geochemical signals in bivalve carbonate hold the potential to record environmental change over timescales from months to centuries; however, not all bivalves provide reliable proxy records, and modern studies are essential to calibrate these relationships prior to use in palaeo-environmental reconstruction. In this study, 19 shells of the estuarin...
Article
Full-text available
Mulloway (Argyrosomus japonicus) are an iconic recreational, indigenous, and commercial fishery species with declining numbers across some parts of their range, with relatively little known about their movements. During the Austral summers and autumns from 2011 to 2014, we deployed 19 pop-up satellite archival tags (PSATs) on mature mulloway at an...
Article
Reconstructing movements and environmental histories of sharks may be possible by using the element composition of vertebrae, but unlocking such possibilities requires an understanding of the effects of extrinsic and intrinsic factors on element composition. We assessed water temperature and pH effects (independently and in combination) on vertebra...
Article
Connectivity during the ontogenetic development of fishes identifies the spatial scale over which populations function, which is the appropriate scale for conservation and management. For many marine species, spawning grounds and nursery areas are spatially segregated and larval dispersal is an obligate process that connects life history stages. Th...
Article
Full-text available
Migration is a widespread but highly diverse component of many animal life histories. Fish migrate throughout the world's oceans, within lakes and rivers, and between the two realms, transporting matter, energy, and other species (e.g., microbes) across boundaries. Migration is therefore a process responsible for myriad ecosystem services. Many hum...
Article
Connectivity between juvenile habitats and adult stocks is important for determining the resilience of local fisheries and the relative contribution of different juvenile habitat areas to adult populations. Otolith chemistry is commonly employed to differentiate between individuals from different juvenile habitat areas; whereby different environmen...
Article
Full-text available
Many shark species are at risk of overexploitation due to their high economic value, slow maturation, and low recruitment compared to most teleosts. However, there is insufficient knowledge about population structure at different spatial scales necessary to optimise fisheries models. We used single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) obtained through c...
Article
Full-text available
Knowledge about reproductive movements can be of important conservation value for over-exploited species that are vulnerable when moving between and within key reproductive habitats. Lack of knowledge persists around such movements in the overfished school shark Galeorhinus galeus in Australia. Management assumes all pregnant females migrate betwee...
Article
Full-text available
Identifying trends and drivers of fish growth in commercial species is important for ongoing sustainable management, but there is a critical shortage of long‐term datasets in marine systems. Using otolith (ear bone) sclerochronology and mixed‐effects modeling, we reconstructed nearly four decades (37 yr) of growth across four oceanographically dive...
Article
Understanding the early life history processes of fish that lead to recruitment is critical for understanding population dynamics. This study explored the early life history of King George whiting (Sillaginodes punctatus) that recruited to an important nursery area in South Australia in 2016 and 2017. The early life history was reconstructed based...
Article
We investigated the presence of 66 human and veterinary pharmaceuticals from seven therapeutic groups insurface waters of the Tejo estuary. Collection sites covered the entire estuary and included areas near main riverinflows and wastewater treatment outfalls, traversing urban, agriculture, aquaculture, and nature reserve areas.Detection of pharmace...
Article
This study uses Ca and Sr isotopes (δ44/40Ca and 87Sr/86Sr), coupled with elemental ratios, to better understand the water source apportionment and carbonate output in the Coorong, Lower Lakes and Murray Mouth Estuary, which represents the terminus of Australia’s longest river system. The geochemistry of waters in the Coorong (i.e., North and South...
Article
Full-text available
Effective fisheries management generally requires reliable data describing the target species’ life-history characteristics, the size of its harvested populations, and overall catch estimates, to set sustainable quotas and management regulations. However, stock assessments are often not available for long-lived marine species such as sharks, making...
Article
Full-text available
Knowledge of reproductive movements and sources of recruitment in highly mobile species is important to understand population-level resilience and to manage recovery in populations depleted by human interference. Management of the school shark Galeorhinus galeus (Linnaeus, 1758), a Conservation Dependent species in Australia subject to a national r...
Article
Full-text available
Processes regulating population connectivity are complex, ranging from extrinsic environmental factors to intrinsic individual based features, and are a major force shaping the persistence of fish species and population responses to harvesting and environmental change. Here we developed an integrated assessment of demographic and genetic connectivi...
Article
Full-text available
Estuaries provide important nursery habitats for juvenile fish, but many species move between estuarine and coastal habitats throughout their life. We used otolith chemistry to evaluate the use of estuaries and the coastal marine environment by juvenile Pomatomus saltatrix in eastern Australia. Otolith chemical signatures of juveniles from 12 estua...
Article
Full-text available
Sulfur isotope ratios are used to untangle food web dynamics, track animal movements and determine dietary provenance. Yet, their application in the biomineralised tissues of animals is relatively unexplored. These tissues are particularly useful for isotopic analyses as they can retain a permanent and temporally-resolved chemical record over the l...
Article
Full-text available
Much has been revealed about fish migration, including diadromous behaviour, through the use of otolith chemistry. Manipulative experiments assist with unravelling information on otolith chemical composition and incorporation thereby answering specific questions on diadromous movements. In this study, a laboratory-based experiment was used to deter...
Article
Reconstructing habitat use and environmental histories of fish via otolith chemistry relies on linking otolith chemical composition to the surrounding environment, as well as disentangling the consequences of ontogenetic or physiological effects that may mask environmental signals. We used multiple linear and linear mixed models to analyse the impo...
Article
Native fish populations have been strongly impacted by fishing, habitat alteration and the introduction of invasive species. Understanding the dynamics of native fish populations prior to commercial fishing can be problematic, but provides critical baseline data for fish conservation, rehabilitation and management. We combined fish size, age and gr...
Article
Effective fisheries management generally requires reliable data describing the target species' life-history characteristics, the size of its harvested populations, and overall catch estimates, to set sustainable quotas and management regulations. However, stock assessments are often not available for long-lived marine species such as sharks, making...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the spatial distribution of human impacts on marine environments is necessary for maintaining healthy ecosystems and supporting 'blue economies'. Realistic assessments of impact must consider the cumulative impacts of multiple, coincident threats and the differing vulnerabilities of ecosystems to these threats. Expert knowledge is oft...
Article
Fish otoliths are widely used to answer biological and ecological questions related to movements and habitat use based on their chemical composition. Two fundamental assumptions underlie otoliths as environmental tracers and proxies for reconstructing exposure histories: (i) otolith chemistry reflects water chemistry, and (ii) ambient environmental...
Article
Full-text available
Hypoxic or oxygen-free zones are linked to large-scale mortalities of fauna in aquatic environments. Studies investigating the hypoxia tolerance of fish are limited and focused on marine species and short-term exposure. However, there has been minimal effort to understand the implications of long-term exposure on fish and their ability to acclimate...
Article
Otolith chemistry is used widely to reconstruct the environmental histories of fish. Examining the relationships between environmental conditions and otolith chemistry is an essential first step towards accurately reconstructing environmental histories, with lack of information potentially resulting in the erroneous interpretation of fish movement...
Article
Full-text available
Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) radiocarbon dates (n=20) determined on fish otoliths from mulloway (Argyrosomus japonicus) and black bream (Acanthopagrus butcheri) are reported from five sites at Long Point, Coorong, South Australia. The dates range from 2938–2529 to 326–1 cal. BP, extending the known period of occupation of Long Point. Previou...
Article
Ocean acidification threatens marine ecosystems by altering ocean chemistry and calcification processes in marine organisms. This study investigated the effects of predicted future CO2 levels, under varying temperature levels, on otolith development (size and shape) and chemistry, with the latter aimed at developing a chemical tracer of environment...