Bron Raymond Taylor

Bron Raymond Taylor
University of Florida | UF · Department of Religion & School of Natural Resources & the Environment

Ph.D., Social Ethics, University of Southern California
Research on religion and environmental behavior, 'dark green religion,' and radical environmentalism in N. America.

About

92
Publications
96,447
Reads
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2,052
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Introduction
Bron Taylor is an interdisciplinary environmental studies scholar trained in ethics, religious studies, and social scientific approaches to understanding human culture. His research focuses especially on the intersection of what people construe as 'religion' and 'nature.', and engages the quest for environmentally sustainable societies. He played a leading role in constructing the world's first Ph.D. program with an emphasis in Religion and Nature. Details at www.brontaylor.com.
Additional affiliations
July 2011 - present
Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich
Position
  • Carson Fellow, Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society
August 2002 - present
University of Florida
Position
  • Professor (Full) of Religion, Nature & Environmental Ethics
Description
  • Professor of Environmental Ethics, Religion, and Nature
September 1989 - May 2002
University of Wisconsin - Oshkosh
Description
  • Founding Director of the Environmental Studies Program
Education
September 1981 - December 1988
University of Southern California
Field of study
  • Social Ethics
September 1977 - March 1980
Fuller Theological Seminary
Field of study
  • Religious Ethics
September 1975 - June 1977
California State University, Chico
Field of study
  • Psychology & Religious Studies (Double Major)

Publications

Publications (92)
Book
Full-text available
In this innovative and deeply felt work, Bron Taylor examines the evolution of "green religions" in North America and beyond: spiritual practices that hold nature as sacred and have in many cases replaced traditional religions. Tracing a wide range of groups-radical environmental activists, lifestyle-focused bioregionalists, surfers, new-agers invo...
Article
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"Soul surfers" consider surfing to be a profoundly meaningful practice that brings physical, psychological, and spiritual benefits. They generally agree on where surfing initially developed, that it assumed a religious character, was suppressed for religious reasons, has been undergoing a revival, and enjoins reverence for and protection of nature....
Article
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Sumario: Popular ecological resistance in the Americas -- Popular ecological resistance in Asia and in the Pacific -- Popular ecological resistance in Africa -- Popular ecological resistance in Europe -- Concluding reflections on the global emergence of popular ecological resistance Bibliografía: P. 355-405
Article
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The Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) has become influential in biodiversity conservation. Its research is published widely and has been adopted by the United Nations and the Convention for Biological Diversity. This platform includes discussion about how values relate to biodiversity conservat...
Article
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As this special issue goes to press we are entering a third year of the coronavirus pandemic, with global deaths at 5.4 million and rising (COVID-19 Dashboard 2021).1 A February 2021 Pew Research Center poll asking people what they think life will be like in 2025 captured the current zeitgeist: ‘A plurality of experts think sweeping societal change...
Article
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The unfolding crises of mass extinction and climate change call for urgent action in response. To limit biodiversity losses and avert the worst effects of climate disruption, we must greatly expand nature protection while simultaneously downsizing and transforming human systems. The conservation initiative Nature Needs Half (or Half Earth), calling...
Article
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This retrospective revisits the argument and evidence advanced in Dark Green Religion: Nature Spirituality and the Planetary Future (University of California Press 2010) ten years after its publication. These reflections are adapted from the ‘Vorwort zur deutschen Neuausgabe: Dunkelgrüne Religion – Zehn Jahre danach’, with which I introduced the Ge...
Article
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Michael Soulé is best known for his scientific contributions and central role founding the Society for Conservation Biology and its journal. Less well known are his childhood experiences, his affinity for Zen Buddhism and Arne Naess' deep ecology philosophy, and his contributions as an environmental activist to efforts to protect biodiversity and r...
Article
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Since The Limits to Growth study in 1972 scores of studies have concluded that, without a dramatic reduction in human numbers and per-capita consumption and thus ecosystem destruction, and absent concomitant transformation of technological, economic, political, and value systems, widespread collapse of Earth’s socioecological systems will commence...
Article
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Over the past five decades, scientists have been documenting negative anthropogenic environmental change, expressing increasing alarm and urging dramatic socioecological transformation in response. A host of international meetings have been held but the erosion of biological diversity continues to accelerate. The lack of effective political action...
Article
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There is no scientific consensus whether a new epoch labeled the Anthropocene should be declared and, if so, when it started. Yet the basic idea can be helpful and provocatively stated: The Anthropocene is that period in Earth’s history traceable to when Homo sapiens began subjugating and expropriating for its own use the world’s organisms and ecos...
Article
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Through a novel survey instrument, we examined traits and characteristics that various scholars and observers have averred promote or hinder proenvironmental behaviors. We found that those who hold anthropocentric and monotheistic religious views, and express low levels of environmental, religious, and cosmic humility, are less likely to engage in...
Article
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Anthropocentrism, in its original connotation in environmental ethics, is the belief that value is human-centred and that all other beings are means to human ends. Environmentally -concerned authors have argued that anthropocentrism is ethically wrong and at the root of ecological crises. Some environmental ethicists argue, however, that critics of...
Article
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The Future of Conservation survey, launched in March 2017, has proposed a framework to help with interpreting the array of ethical stances underpinning the motivations for biological conservation. In this article we highlight what is missing in this debate to date. Our overall aim is to explore what an acceptance of ecocentric ethics would mean for...
Chapter
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The motion picture Avatar, directed by James Cameron, metaphorically spotlighted the long processes on Earth wherein powerful societies invade territories inhabited by indigenous peoples, damaging or destroying their societies and environments. The film, which set box office records around the world, was beloved by theatergoers and passionately deb...
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In this Diversity article we take a closer look at the explicit ecocentric roots of conservation biology, and we note that a growing number of conservationists have recently voiced support for ecocentric natural value. We argue that although ecosystem services arguments may play an important role in stemming our biodiversity crisis, a true transfor...
Article
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If we want a whole Earth, Nature Needs Half: a response to Büscher et al. - Philip Cafaro, Tom Butler, Eileen Crist, Paul Cryer, Eric Dinerstein, Helen Kopnina, Reed Noss, John Piccolo, Bron Taylor, Carly Vynne, Haydn Washington
Article
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Ecocentrism is the broadest term for worldviews that recognize intrinsic value in all lifeforms and ecosystems themselves, including their abiotic components. Anthropocentrism, in contrast, values other lifeforms and ecosystems insofar as they are valuable for human well-being, preferences and interests. Herein, the authors examine the roots of eco...
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A reply to ‘Half-Earth or Whole Earth? Radical ideas for conservation, and their implication' Büscher et al.'s (2016) recent article ‘Half-Earth or Whole Earth? Radical ideas for conservation, and their implications’ raises some important issues for conservation, but it paints a misleading picture of the Nature Needs Half movement. Nature Needs Ha...
Article
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Environment-focused institutions affiliated with the United Nations and other non-governmental agencies have long sought to mobilize religious individuals and groups to construct environmentally sustainable societies. Often, those involved have come from the world's academic, religious, and political intelligentsias. Two major conferences in 2016 c...
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Lynn White, Jr.’s ‘The Historical Roots of Our Ecologic Crisis’, which was published in Science in 1967, has played a critically important role in environmental studies. Although White advanced a multifaceted argument, most respondents focused on his claim that the ‘Judeo-Christian’ tradition, especially Christianity, has promoted anthropocentric a...
Article
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Herein we provide a comprehensive review of research pertinent to Lynn White, Jr.’s contentions in 'The Historical Roots of Our Ecologic Crisis' (1967) about the negative environmental impacts of 'Judeo-Christian' ideas as well as subsequent claims that the world’s predominant religions are becoming more environmentally friendly. Definitive conclus...
Article
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An individual gorilla is more valuable than an individual human being. A proposition pondered in this reflection published in the Huffington Post, online at : http://www.huffingtonpost.com/bron-taylor/the-value-of-a-gorilla_b_10214928.html
Chapter
In the twenty-first century, spiritualities that draw on evolutionary and ecological worldviews, stress ecological interdependence, and involve deep feelings of belonging and connection to nature, show signs of having an increasing impact on environmental politics in the United States. Meanwhile, Christian and other religious traditionalists have c...
Chapter
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In the twentieth century, religion, broadly defined, has played a significant role in environmental politics, both promoting and hindering environmental causes. Scholars observing these trends have offered explanations ranging from claims that religions in general (and often Christianity in particular), given their anthropocentrism and otherworldly...
Article
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Lynn White Jr.’s “The Historical Roots of Our Ecologic Crisis,” which was published in Science in 1967, has played a critical role in precipitating interdisciplinary environmental studies. Although White advances a multifaceted argument, most respondents focus on his claim that the Judeo-Christian tradition, especially Christianity, has promoted an...
Article
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Since the early 1990s calls by religious elites as well as by scholars who affiliate with and study religions to address the negative consequences of anthropogenic climate change have been increasing. An important example of the trend occurred in November 2014 during the annual meeting of the American Academy of Religion in San Diego where 'Religio...
Article
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Has the time come for a massive wave of direct action resistance to accelerating rates of environmental degradation around the world-degradation that is only getting worse due to climate change? Is a new wave of direct action resistance emerging, one similar but more widespread than that sparked by Earth First!, the first avowedly "radical" environ...
Article
This is the introduction to my book AVATAR AND NATURE SPIRITUALITY (WLU PRESS), which explores the cultural and religious significance of James Cameron’s film Avatar (2010), one of the most commercially successful motion pictures of all time. Its success was due in no small measure to the beauty of the Pandora landscape and the dramatic, heart-wren...
Article
In October 2011, a group of environmental thinkers—ecologists, philosophers, foresters, poets and novelists, religious and environmental studies specialists, and indigenous traditions experts—met with the audacious goal to write collaboratively a new ethic. The result was a statement of conscience that drew on the collective wisdom of the assembled...
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Despite significant progress in the development of the religion and nature field, there is still far too little data available to evaluate conclusively hypotheses regarding the ‘greening of religion’, regardless of whether the traditions in focus are large or small, longstanding or recently emerging. The field needs to move beyond anecdotal informatio...
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This article offers a description of the phenomenon of environmental millennialism. Environmentalism synthesises hard science and religion to formulate millennial themes. Although relevant ecological awareness dawned only in the middle of the twentieth century, man's mastery and manipulation over and of nature, have been inspiring Romantics with ap...
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Radical environmentalism most commonly brings to mind the actions of those who break laws in dramatic displays of "direct action" in defense of nature. Such action—which may involve civil disobedience and sabotage—has led to charges that these activists are terrorists and fears that they may harbor or hope to develop weapons of mass death. The focu...
Book
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The award winning Encyclopedia of Religion and Nature critically explores the relationships among human beings, their environments, and the religious dimensions of life. This wide-ranging work — chronologically, geographically, religiously — includes 1,000 entries from 520 international contributors. In addition to the standard, scholarly entry, th...
Article
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Outdoor adventure and other recreational practices can express, evoke, and reinforce religious perceptions and orientations to natural and social worlds. Some participants in them understand nature itself to be sacred in some way and believe that facilitating human connections to nature is the most important aspect of their chosen practice. Such ac...
Article
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A wide-ranging, interdisciplinary, taboo-free inquiry is essential to engage the central question animating this new journal: What are the relationships among human beings, their diverse religions, and the earth's living sys- tems? Likewise, it is critical that we wrestle with the terms that constitute the journal's title—religion, nature and cultu...
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of the,abstract conception,of selfhood,and,dogmatic rationalism found in some versions of social ecology.
Chapter
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Article
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In recent decades, debates have erupted and intensified about the relationships between religions, cultures, and the earth’s living systems. Some scholars have argued that ritual and religion can play a salutary role in helping humans regulate natural systems in ecologically sustainable ways. Others have blamed one or more religions, or religion in...
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Recent claims that Radical Environmentalists are becoming increasingly likely to deploy weapons of mass death are characterized by a selective reading of the facts, a failure to apprehend significant differences among radical groups, and injudicious speculation. A more careful analysis of the likelihood of violence emerging from radical environment...
Article
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Earth and nature-based spirituality is proliferating globally. In Part I of this study, I argued that although participants in these countercultural movements often eschew the label religion, these are religious movements, in which persons find ultimate meaning and transformative power in nature. Focusing on the deep ecology movement, I further arg...
Article
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Earth and nature-based spirituality is proliferating globally. In Part I of this study, I argue that although participants in countercultural movements often eschew the label religion, these are religious movements, in which these persons find ultimate meaning and transformative power in nature. Focusing on the deep ecology movement, I further argu...
Article
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Since the 1980 formation of Earth First!, radical environmental movements have proliferated widely. Their adversaries, law enforcement authorities and some scholars accuse them of violence and terrorism. Here, I scrutinize such charges by examining 18 years of radical environmentalism for evidence of violence and for indications of violent tendenci...
Article
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The appropriation by non-Indians of Native American religious practices has become a highly contentious phenomenon. The present analysis focuses on the controversy as it has unfolded within the ‘Deep Ecology’ or ‘Radical Environmental’ Movement in North America. Taking as its central case study Earth First!, the radical vanguard of this movement, i...
Article
In Earth's Insights Baird Callicott develops a science-based but religiously influenced global environmental ethics that attempts to resolve the relationships between science, religion, and morality. He proposes to privilege science and relegate religion to a supportive and corrective role in environmental ethics. I argue, on the contrary, that a r...
Article
In Earth's Insights Baird Callicott develops a science-based but religiously influenced global environmental ethics that attempts to resolve the relationships between science, religion, and morality. He proposes to privilege science and relegate religion to a supportive and corrective role in environmental ethics. I argue, on the contrary, that a r...
Article
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“Deep ecology” is a term coined in 1973 by the Norwegian philosopher Arne Naess. It has become the central label for an increasingly militant branch of the international environmental movement. Deep ecology rejects mechanistic assumptions about the natural world, supplanting them with the premise that at a metaphysical level, the natural world is a...
Article
The electronic version of this book has been prepared by scanning TIFF 600 dpi bitonal images of the pages of the text. Original source: Affirmative action at work : law, politics, and ethics / Bron Raymond Taylor.; Taylor, Bron Raymond.; xvii, 251 p. ; 24 cm.; Pittsburgh, Pa. :; This electronic text file was created by Optical Character Recognitio...
Book
Based on mixed methods research of affected employees in California's Department of Parks and Recreation, argues that affirmative action policies, and related anti-discrimination laws and protections, are warranted, and that the typical arguments against them, on balance, do not outweigh their positive impacts on employees, morale, and the workplac...
Article
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Green and Dark Green Religion Green religion as I use the term is a broad umbrella for every type of religious environmentalism, both those with deep roots in Western and Asian cultures, and more recent innovations that are emerging in the age of ecology. The types of religious environmentalism where practitioners and scholars affi liated with the...

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Projects

Projects (5)
Project
I have written widely about these movements including in Ecological Resistance Movements, and edited volume that looks at such movements globally. I am currently writing a book focusing on such movements in North America and welcome leads on scholarly and popular resources. (Its a big topic so may have missed important work.)
Project
Promoting ecocentrism as a way of addressing the greatest challenges of environmental sustainability
Project
To understand and advance just conservation in the context of environmental justice and, simultaneously, ecological justice or justice between species