Britta Wigginton

Britta Wigginton
The University of Queensland | UQ

BA (Hons), PhD.

About

37
Publications
8,878
Reads
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736
Citations
Citations since 2016
24 Research Items
680 Citations
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Introduction
Dr Britta Wigginton is a non-Indigenous researcher who is committed to the work of social justice and transformation. She is passionate about reflexive research that acknowledges power, representation and meaning. She takes this energy into the classroom and her research to advocate for ways of thinking and being that challenge the status quo.
Additional affiliations
February 2015 - November 2015
Australian Catholic University
Position
  • Lecturer
January 2013 - January 2016
The University of Queensland
Position
  • Research Officer
Description
  • Qualitative research officer on ARC funded research project concerned with young Australian women's contraceptive use and pregnancy plan and an ARC funded project examining smokers' perceptions of addiction.
March 2011 - December 2012
The University of Queensland
Position
  • Tutor
Description
  • Tutored five undergraduate psychology courses covering developmental, social, and health psychology.
Education
March 2011 - October 2015
The University of Queensland
Field of study
  • Psychology
March 2007 - November 2010
The University of Queensland
Field of study
  • Psychology

Publications

Publications (37)
Article
Four non-Indigenous academics share lessons learned through our reflective processes while working with Indigenous Australian partners on a health research project. We foregrounded reflexivity in our work to raise consciousness regarding how colonizing mindsets—that do not privilege Indigenous ways of knowing or recognize Indigenous land and sovere...
Article
Health promotion researchers and practitioners are grappling with how to address growing health inequalities for population groups. In particular, critiques of dominant behaviour change approaches draw attention to the need to engage with social theories to better understand the social and relational drivers of health. Public health researchers are...
Article
Full-text available
As we approach Feminism & Psychology’s 30th anniversary, we reflect on and explore what makes the journal distinctive – its emphasis on critical feminist psychology. In this article and the accompanying Virtual Special Issue, we outline five methodological considerations that we believe are at the heart of critical feminist scholarship: 1) the poli...
Article
Full-text available
Many historical, environmental, socioeconomic, political, commercial, and geographic factors underscore the food insecurity and poor diet-related health experienced by Aboriginal people in Australia. Yet, there has been little exploration of Aboriginal food practices or perspectives on food choice recently. This study, with 13 households in remote...
Article
Increasingly, people turn to online sources for health information, creating human-non-human relationalities. Health websites are considered accessible in scope and convenience but can have limited capacity to accommodate complexities. There are concerns about who gets to ‘assemble’ with these resources, and who is excluded. Guided by Ahmed’s socio...
Article
Rates of oral contraceptive pill use have declined over the past decade in Australia. While some women use highly effective methods, others rely on less effective methods such as condoms, withdrawal and fertility awareness. We aimed to understand motivations for relying on these methods among young women in Australia. Women aged 18-23 years who rep...
Article
There is growing consensus around the limited attention given to documenting the process of intervention development, specifically the role of qualitative research. In this article, we seek to describe a missing piece of this process: how qualitative research, and related methodologies and theories, informs intervention development. We use our rese...
Article
Full-text available
This article serves as a welcoming introduction to feminist epistemologies and methodologies, written to accompany (and intended to be read prior to) the Virtual Special Issue on ‘Doing Critical Feminist Research’. In recalling our own respective journeys into the exciting field of feminist research, we invite new readers in appreciating the steep...
Article
In response to accreditation of our Master of Public Health (MPH) program, integration of Indigenous public health competencies, and implementation of the health promotion practitioner accreditation in Australia, we designed a core MPH health promotion course. In this article, we begin by describing the three sets of competencies that informed our...
Article
Full-text available
Cancer has become a global health concern with marked differences in the incidence and mortality rates between developing and developed countries. Understanding the factors hat shape uptake of preventative and screening services is key. We use in-depth interviews with 13 Zambian urban-based female cancer survivors to explore the facilitators and ba...
Article
Objective Developments in reversible forms of female contraception are more advanced than developments in male contraception – which are still limited to the condom. These technological advancements have arguably shaped views around who should take responsibility for contraception. We investigate the notion that responsibility relates to gender-spe...
Article
This article explores how women account for their experiences of pregnancy distress in light of cultural imperatives to be the perfect, happy mother. Our analysis is based on the accounts of 18 Australian women, interviewed during pregnancy on the basis of their reports of experiencing depression and/or anxiety. Working within a feminist discursive...
Article
Background: Despite the centrality of addiction in academic accounts of smoking, there is little research on smokers' beliefs about addiction to smoking, and the role of nicotine in tobacco dependence. Smokers' perspectives on nicotine's role in addiction are important given the increasing prevalence of non-tobacco nicotine products such as e-ciga...
Article
In this article, I argue that gender is a complex sociocultural construct, yet how gender is accounted for in psychological research is limited. Specifically, psychologists conflate sex with gender, rely on quantifying gender differences and, by implication, conceptualise gender as merely a participant characteristic. To illustrate, I apply this vi...
Article
Full-text available
Background Access to most contraceptives in Australia requires a prescription from a doctor, and it has been shown that doctors can influence women’s decision-making with respect to contraception. However, little research has documented how women experience their interactions with doctors within the context of a contraceptive consultation. Understa...
Article
Full-text available
Since the 1980s, it has been widely accepted that nicotine is an addictive drug. While discussions of smoking inevitably lead smokers to reflect on their addiction, smokers’ perceptions of nicotine addiction specifically are rarely studied. Smokers’ understandings of nicotine addiction are increasingly relevant in light of the emergence of electron...
Article
Full-text available
This study aims to understand the nature and significance of online lay discussions about e-cigarettes and mental illness. We systematically searched the website Reddit.com using keywords related to e-cigarettes and mental illness. We coded relevant posts into themes under the framework of motivations for and limitations of vaping for people with m...
Article
Scholarship on stigma, originally theorised as a ‘mark’ of social disgrace or difference, has since moved away from individual-level analyses to consider the socio-cultural context in the ‘marking’ of groups of people. In response to this theoretical shift, scholars have demonstrated how extensive tobacco denormalisation policies have contributed t...
Article
Background: Unintended pregnancy disproportionately affects young Australian women. However, contraceptive behaviours associated with unintended pregnancy are unclear. Objective: The objective of this article was to examine contraceptive use before unintended conception. Methods: Data from 3795 women (aged 18-23 years) who completed the baseli...
Article
Introduction: Electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use, or vaping, is increasing against a backdrop of declining smoking rates. E-cigarettes contain fewer toxicants than cigarettes but their appearance and mode of use has the potential to satisfy the habitual aspects of smoking. To date, we know little about lay perceptions of the safety of using e-c...
Article
In this article, we discuss a number of important considerations that we have encountered in the process of researching health stigma topics as ‘outsiders’: researchers (personally) unfamiliar with the experience or topic under study. In particular, we discuss the importance of the following: a reflective stance, challenging negative representation...
Article
Background Women commonly report changing contraceptive methods because of side-effects. However, there is a lack of literature that has thoroughly examined women's perspectives, including why they changed contraception. Aim Using qualitative data from a contraceptive survey of young Australian women, we explored women's explanations for their rece...
Article
In this case study, we explore the challenges associated with researching a stigmatized topic (women’s experiences of smoking during pregnancy) and in doing so trace “behind-the-scenes” of our research journey. This case study is based on a collaboration between the two authors and formed part of the first author’s PhD research. We start by describ...
Article
Full-text available
New developments in female contraceptives allow women increased options for preventing pregnancy, while men's options for reversible contraception have not advanced beyond the condom. There has been little discursive exploration of how neoliberal and postfeminist discourses shape women's accounts of choosing whether or not to use contraception. Our...
Article
Full-text available
Drawing on public and private accounts of smoking during pregnancy (interviews, survey responses, and a public media article), we examine how women discursively manage the ‘spoiled’ identity associated with inhabiting the body of a ‘pregnant smoker’. We focus on two salient identities ‘the silenced smoker’ and ‘the bad mother’ and explore the discu...
Article
Full-text available
This special issue showcases the contributions of mostly early career researchers to illustrate the methodological opportunities and challenges that arise in doing critical qualitative research on the Internet. As we discuss, the articles included in this special issue demonstrate innovative qualitative methods that can be applied to Internet resea...
Article
Recruitment of young people for epidemiologic research remains challenging, with marked decreases in the effectiveness of face-to-face, mail, and telephone recruitment methods. We report on the implementation and feasibility of an innovative and flexible approach used to recruit participants for a longitudinal cohort study about contraceptive use a...
Article
Full-text available
The oral contraceptive pill remains the most widely used contraceptive method. We consider The Pill’s depiction as variously revolutionary and liberating, oppressive for women, and more recently, a ‘lifestyle drug’. Drawing on discourses of (hetero)sex, heterosexuality and gender performance, we discuss how contraceptive use has been feminised and...
Article
Young children commonly encounter difficulties at mealtimes, which are important to address early to avoid the maintenance of problematic eating behaviour. Amongst these are drawn-out meals, which some research has associated with more mealtime problems. However, research on meal duration, and therefore guidelines for appropriate meal length, is la...
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Full-text available
Despite women’s awareness of the risks of smoking in pregnancy to the developing foetus, a significant minority continue to smoke during pregnancy. In this article, we use a discourse analytic approach to analyse interviews with 12 Australian women who smoked during a recent pregnancy. We used these data to examine how women accounted for their smo...
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Full-text available
Qualitative methodologies offer various approaches to interpreting qualitative data. Here, we consider how different approaches to interpreting the same data can be useful in learning about the scope and utility of qualitative methods, as well as exploring the role of reflexivity in analytic decision-making and interpretation. We apply both themati...
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Full-text available
Australia is at the forefront of tobacco control, yet 17% of Australian women smoke during pregnancy. Negative attitudes to smoking are intensified when the smoker is pregnant, consistent with a discourse that encourages surveillance of pregnant women. Such overt anti-smoking attitudes create a context which may make it difficult for pregnant smoke...
Article
Full-text available
A substantial minority of Western women smoke during pregnancy. Understanding smoking from these women’s point of view may provide a richer understanding of experiences that are very often silenced, and provide some explanation for why pregnant women smoke despite widely disseminated public health campaigns urging them to stop. Strong social pressu...

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