Brigitte Howarth

Brigitte Howarth
American University In Dubai · Office of Institutional Effectiveness

PhD
Malaise Trap sample analysis; Anthracocentrus arabicus data analysis; British Travel log Analysis

About

16
Publications
4,843
Reads
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166
Citations
Introduction
Brigitte Howarth currently works at the College of Natural and Health Science, with a portfolio at the CEI, Zayed University. Brigitte does research in Desert Ecology (UAE and Oman), Entomology, Environmental History, as well as pedagogical research. A current project is the 'Ecology of Anthracocentrus arabicus.'
Additional affiliations
January 2021 - present
American University In Dubai
Position
  • Managing Director
Description
  • At AUD, my role as director of institutional effectiveness includes the following: - Responsible for overseeing the university’s IE initiatives - Provide leadership in developing the institutional research, planning, assessment and accreditation protocols - Serve as the liaison with national and international accrediting bodies Ecology research is ongoing, with all projects listed
August 2004 - December 2020
Zayed University
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
Description
  • First as Assistant Professor, then promoted to Associate Professor. Roles included faculty member, chair, co-chair university accreditation reaffirmation (MSCHE)

Publications

Publications (16)
Book
An updated checklist and narrative accounts discussing the identification, habits, habitats and distribution of the 58+ species of butterflies that have been recorded in the UAE and neighboring Oman, with extensive illustrations of most species and their life cycles.
Article
Full-text available
We conducted a cross-sectional survey of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) in dromedary camels and attached ticks at 3 locations in the United Arab Emirates. Results revealed a high prevalence of CCHFV-reactive antibodies in camels and viral RNA in ticks and camel serum, suggesting the virus is endemic in this country.
Chapter
This chapter examines natural habitats in Dubai, UAE that the state has demarcated as protected areas (PAs) in an attempt to utilize them for recreational/economic purposes while also mitigating habitat fragmentation. The authors employ the concept of the ‘commodity frontier’ to demonstrate how these PAs have contributed to the ongoing commodificat...
Article
Full-text available
We conducted a cross-sectional survey of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) in dromedary camels and attached ticks at 3 locations in the United Arab Emirates. Results revealed a high prevalence of CCHFV-reactive antibodies in camels and viral RNA in ticks and camel serum, suggesting the virus is endemic in this country.
Article
Beginning in the late 1940s, the British took a keen interest in expanding water resources and developing agriculture in the Trucial States (the modern-day United Arab Emirates). This article explores the ideological, political, and economic motivations driving these colonial development initiatives. Ultimately, such projects entailed a fundamental...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract: An Iranian tiger beetle species, Callytron monalisa (W. Horn, 1927) (Coleoptera: Cicindelidae) was found and photographed on Reem Island, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, thus proving itself to occur in the Arabian peninsula as well, south of the Arabian Gulf. The general distribution of other supposed Iranian endemics is also briefly dis...
Article
Full-text available
The United Arab Emirates is a small Gulf country with perhaps the fastest rate of infrastructure development anywhere. While there is legislation in place requiring environmental impact assessments (EIA) to be undertaken for all major projects, the speed and scope of development provides special challenges in devising and implementing ecological mi...
Article
Full-text available
Conservation of larger terrestrial organisms is easier in comparison with arthropods because those groups are more visible, are generally better known and their requirements more likely to have been described and documented. Arthropods are often very small, e.g. the average size of a beetle is 4 mm, and this means that much arthropod biodiversity h...
Article
Full-text available
Th e United Arab Emirates is a small Gulf country with perhaps the fastest rate of infrastructure develop- ment anywhere. While there is legislation in place requiring environmental impact assessments (EIA) to be undertaken for all major projects, the speed and scope of development provides special challenges in devis- ing and implementing ecologic...
Article
The phenology of aculeate Hymenoptera and of syrphids which are believed to mimic them has been investigated at three semi-natural ancient woodland sites in north-west England. It is concluded that the abundance and phenology of most of the hoverflies is consistent with their being Batesian mimics of particular species of bee or wasp. The main exce...
Article
We tested the prediction that, if hoverflies are Batesian mimics, this may extend to behavioral mimicry such that their numerical abundance at each hour of the day (the daily activity pattern) is related to the numbers of their hymenopteran models. After accounting for site, season, microclimatic responses, and general hoverfly abundance at three s...
Article
Full-text available
Blanford’s Fox, Vulpes cana, occurs throughout the mountainous eastern region of the United Arab Emirates. External body measurements are similar to those presented for the species in other areas of their range. The diet consists mainly of invertebrates and fruit. Blanford’s Foxes were observed with white as well as black tail tips.
Article
The phenology of aculeate Hymenoptera and of syrphids which are believed to mimic them has been investigated at three semi-natural ancient woodland sites in north-west England. It is concluded that the abundance and phenology of most of the hoverflies is consistent with their being Batesian mimics of particular species of bee or wasp. The main exce...
Article
Full-text available
Diptera are the two-winged flies, the name originating from the Greek words dis, meaning two, and pteron, meaning wing. Flies are the second largest group of insects with approximately 125,000 species described worldwide. This account is the most complete to date for UAE Diptera and includes 28 families, of which 7 are new records to the UAE. The t...

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