Brigid Mary Costello

Brigid Mary Costello
UNSW Sydney | UNSW · School of the Arts and Media

PhD, University of Technology, Sydney Australia

About

43
Publications
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479
Citations
Introduction
I research on digital media design across both theory and practice. My research focuses on two key areas; the affective dimensions of playful interactive experience and methods for the analysis of audience response to interactive artworks. My current research is investigating rhythm and rhythmic experience within playful interaction design.

Publications

Publications (43)
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Much has been written in recent times about game-based learning with the aim to bring together elements of game design and instructional design to make education more engaging. Sadly the results have been rather hit-and-miss and most educational games fail to either entertain or educate. Yet there are many entertaining computer games which exhibit...
Chapter
Full-text available
Interactive artists are increasingly turning to formal audience evaluation as a way to develop a deeper understanding of the relationship between their art and its audience. In order to do this they will often need to engage with unfamiliar research traditions and respond to a wide range and great number of opinions about their work. This can make...
Article
Full-text available
This paper describes a study into the situated experience of interactive art. The study was conducted with audiences of the artwork Iamascope and is framed by the four categories of embodied experience that have been proposed by its artist Sidney Fels. The video-cued recall method we employed was shown to reveal rich detail about situated interacti...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
We describe a case study of the audience experience of an interactive artwork titled Just a Bit of Spin. This study was part of practice-based research project that aimed to develop strategies for designing for a play experience. In this paper, we focus on results relating to the two play characteristics of difficulty and competition. These results...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper focuses on the design of pleasurably playful interfaces within an interactive art context. It describes the development of a framework of thirteen pleasures of play and outlines the application of this framework during the design process of three interactive artworks. These processes included both initial conceptual development stages an...
Conference Paper
To focus on rhythms within the lived relations between humans and technology is to focus on unfolding processes, dynamic temporality, and patterns of change and continuity. Rhythms infuse the political, the social, the personal and the technological. Through anticipation and expectation rhythms also point towards the future and its tendencies. Draw...
Article
Interviews with three dancers and three percussionists about performing, perceiving and composing rhythms are used to develop insights into ways that interaction designers might understand and shape the rhythmic experiences of their users. These insights coalesce around three themes: feeling your way into a rhythm, performing rhythms and the dance...
Chapter
Our world is composed of rhythms. We walk in rhythms, gesture in rhythms, speak in rhythms, breathe and think in rhythms. We also read rhythms from the environment and people around us. Sitting inside by a window, we can tell the strength of the wind just from the movement of trees and their leaves. Before we see the beach, we can tell the ferocity...
Chapter
When users first encounter an interactive application, their personal rhythms need to synchronise with and become attuned to its rhythms. Any breakdown of rhythmic synchrony at this stage can leave users confused, distracted, frustrated or bored. Often, users can’t explain this breakdown, apart from having a sense that the application “just didn’t...
Chapter
The overall rhythmic structure of an interactive experience creates a moving trajectory that through anticipation pulls our present and future attention ever onwards. It creates a journey over time, as composer Bree van Reyk puts it. Crafting the rhythmic structure of this journey is now our focus in this chapter. We look at the way rhythmic struct...
Chapter
In this chapter, we now explore the concept of vitality and focus on the way that a playful rhythm can produce vitality, animating both people and interactive systems. Vitality emerges through a process of energy exchange. Energy will travel both into and out from an interactive system during a rhythmic experience and it is the play of intensities,...
Chapter
To design a rhythm with a focus on predictability involves creating patterns of repetition and change. Although they can be closely intertwined, each will tug at an audience’s attention in different ways. Where repetition can create a soothing predictability that might lull or mesmerise, change can bring an unpredictable energetic vitality that aro...
Chapter
When a musician blows a trumpet, a dancer improvises to a soundscape or a videogame player controls a character’s movement, rhythms are being played. There are two practices of playing rhythm involved in these examples. There is the playing of a rhythm, that is, playing as a performance that keeps time to a beat or score. Then there is playing with...
Chapter
The previous chapter focused on the rhythms of the human body at a micro personal scale. In this chapter, we explore the larger macro rhythms of humans interacting with the people and environments in their everyday life. Our discussion draws inspiration from the design processes of architecture and the sociological method of rhythmanalysis. Both th...
Chapter
Our journey into rhythm, play and interaction design has taken us along many interesting paths, each inspired by one of the eighteen creative practitioners interviewed for this book. Through the ideas of these creative practitioners, we have understood rhythm as something that shapes societies, cultures, thoughts, bodies, meanings and perceptions....
Chapter
Paying attention to a rhythm involves processes of pattern recognition and, depending on what we perceive, these processes can make an experience frustrating, delightful and everything in between. Attention can be played with. It can be focused, drawn in, sculpted and shaped during creative practice. In the moments of attending, our attention might...
Chapter
All rhythms involve patterns of change and the way they transition between (or resolve the tensions between) the changing states has a felt quality. That felt quality will also emerge out of the rhythmic textures of densities, layers and accents within a work. Both textures and transitions contribute to the overall affective tone of a work and this...
Chapter
Our ability to focus on and perceive rhythmic patterns, whether they involve aural, visual, tactile, kinaesthetic or any of our other senses, is a basic human skill that transcends culture and history. We all have a common ability to attend to rhythm yet our culture and its historical context has an impact on which rhythmic patterns we can perceive...
Chapter
We are used to thinking and speaking about knowledge as something primarily produced by abstract thought, despite being aware that knowledge also resides in our practices, in our doing as well as our thinking. Practical bodily knowledge and its relationship to rhythm is the focus of this chapter. We explore the bodily intelligence involved in rhyth...
Book
There are rhythms of action and response to all human-computer interactions. As we click, swipe, tap and sway to their beats, these rhythms intersect with the rhythms of our everyday lives. Perhaps they synchronize, perhaps they disrupt each other or maybe they dance together. Whatever their impact our experience of these rhythms will colour our ex...
Chapter
The article reflects on the artist’s focus on rhythm, play, and the way that dynamic rhythms can create a vitality that encourages play. She creates installations where the audience interacts with something and a response is then generated by a computer so the artistic work emerges through the audiences’ interactions. An important aspect of working...
Conference Paper
This exploratory paper focuses on the rhythm of game interactions and the rhythmic experience of the player. The player’s experience of a rhythm involves patterns of attention that are formed through processes of entrainment and habituation. The player’s body both opens to a rhythm and is influenced by it. There are voluntary and involuntary, consc...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Working with 365 days of pollution data from Sydney, Australia, Blown Away traces the intersection between wind and pollution expressed as rhythms of light and dark within a 3-dimensional grid of cubes. Each day’s pollution particle count is represented by a cluster of cubes that fall from a point drawn from the daily wind direction. This process g...
Article
This article investigates the impact that the rhythms of game interactions can have on a player’s experience of a computer game. Using a phenomenological approach, the research focuses on rhythmic experience within games and, in particular, on the rhythm of tree chopping within the games Minecraft and Don’t Starve. Graphic, aural, and embodied repr...
Conference Paper
Working with 365 days of pollution data from Sydney, Australia, Blown Away traces the intersection between wind and pollution expressed as rhythms of light and dark within a 3-dimensional grid of cubes. Each day’s pollution particle count is represented by a cluster of cubes that fall from a point drawn from the daily wind direction. This process g...
Article
Full-text available
The authors propose that techniques from art and design can be used within social science research as part of a speculative methodology and provide a set of heuristic principles for speculative method, characterizing it as processual, performative, playful, promising and propositional.
Conference Paper
we outline the idea of slow serious interactions, games and diversions. This is similar to aspects of the design philosophy of slow technology [Hallnas and Redstrom 2001] and Bogost’s (2010) slow games or “game poems” titled A Slow Year. Other examples include Edmonds (2000) and Edmonds and Franco (2013) artworks / artifacts and Gaver et al’s (2004...
Article
Full-text available
This paper focuses on the rhythmic interrelationships between the sensing body and the sensing computer. The author proposes that the term kinesthetic empathy provides a useful way of deepening our understanding of feedback and control rhythms.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
While work in interaction design, human-computer interaction (HCI) and the games literature begins to address experience beyond positive, it just scratches the surface. By turning to drama, literature, music, art and film that has shaped experiences and emotion beyond the positive and fun for many years, we describe what experience beyond positive...
Conference Paper
This paper discusses the conceptual, practical and ethical considerations towards the development of a framework of experience to inform design and assessment of serious games. Towards this, we review the literature on experience in interaction design, HCI, and games, and identify that the dominant focus for design has been, and still remains, on p...
Article
Full-text available
Interactive storytelling has been a topic of much debate for the past two decades. Many have foreseen exciting new works; while others have cast doubt on the whole endeavor. In terms of actual titles, most games express a familiar story of a hero triumphing against the odds in order to save the day. However, a number of recent titles have attempted...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The use of threshold concepts to facilitate learner understanding is gaining traction in a variety of disciplines. Put simply, threshold concepts are tacit, abstract and troublesome knowledge that can act as a barrier to student mastery of a discipline. Through the process of understanding a threshold concept the student learns to “think like a pra...
Article
Full-text available
We survey six theories that characterize the pleasurable aspects of a play experience and synthesize these to develop a new framework. This new play framework contains thirteen categories; creation, exploration, discovery, difficulty, competition, danger, captivation, sensation, sympathy, simulation, fantasy, camaraderie and subversion. The methods...
Article
Full-text available
Presents a framework of thirteen categories of pleasure that could be experienced dur- ing a playful experience. Suggests that this framework is a tool that could be used by interactive artists for conceptual development, for reflective practice and for participant evaluations.
Article
Full-text available
This paper describes a collaboration that resulted in the development of a coding scheme for the analysis of interactive art experience. The collaboration involved a multidisciplinary team of analysts who went through an iterative process of coding development in order to reach agreement on what to code, how to code and what to expect from the outc...
Article
An analysis of participation in adult video-conferencing on the internet reveals a subversion of traditional relations between the image and the act in pornography, providing an `interactive' sex entertainment which is both representation (or image) and presentation (or act). CU-SeeMe offers an experience that is at the same time both image and act...
Article
Full-text available
On adult video-conferencing sites, men present sexualized bodies as objects of the gaze through an interactive medium that enables, while it limits, the possibility of the passive and the feminine. Within this unstable subject/object framework, the men construct a masculine subjectivity and a male sexual identity. Male sexuality, through the medium...

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