Brianne Beisner

Brianne Beisner
Emory University | EU · Yerkes Regional Primate Research Center

PhD

About

131
Publications
9,316
Reads
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879
Citations
Additional affiliations
July 2016 - March 2020
University of California, Davis
Position
  • Researcher
June 2012 - July 2016
University of California, Davis
Position
  • Research Assistant
January 2010 - August 2011
Pennsylvania State University
Position
  • Lecturer
Education
September 2003 - September 2008
University of California, Davis
Field of study
  • Biological Anthropology
September 1997 - May 2002
University of Wisconsin–Madison
Field of study
  • Genetics

Publications

Publications (131)
Article
Full-text available
The notion of dominance is ubiquitous across the animal kingdom, wherein some species/groups such relationships are strictly hierarchical and others are not. Modern approaches for measuring dominance have emerged in recent years taking advantage of increased computational power. One such technique, named Percolation and Conductance (Perc), uses bot...
Article
Forming groups of captive rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) is a common management practice. New formations of unfamiliar macaques can be costly, with high levels of trauma, particularly as intense aggression is used to establish a dominance hierarchy. Combining previous subgroups into one new group may be beneficial, as some individuals already hav...
Article
Full-text available
Human population expansion into wildlife habitats has increased interest in the behavioural ecology of human‐wildlife interactions. To date, however, the socio‐ecological factors that determine whether, when or where wild animals take risks by interacting with humans and anthropogenic factors still remains unclear. We adopt a comparative approach t...
Article
In captive populations of rhesus macaques, novel adult males are commonly introduced to female groups every few years to prevent inbreeding, which mimics male dispersal in wild macaque populations. However, introducing adult males is challenging because macaques are aggressive to newcomers, which can result in serious injuries. Efforts to reduce tr...
Preprint
Full-text available
Pandemics caused by wildlife-origin pathogens, like COVID-19, highlight the importance of understanding the ecology of zoonotic transmission and outbreaks among wildlife populations at human-wildlife interfaces. To-date, the relative effects of human-wildlife and wildlife-wildlife interactions on the likelihood of such outbreaks remain unclear. In...
Article
Full-text available
Animal social structure is influenced by multiple socioecological factors. Of these, the links between changes to group demography through the arrival of new individuals and residents’ social structure remain unclear. Across seven groups of captive rhesus macaques ( Macaca mulatta ), we examine how male introductions may be influenced by, and in-tu...
Article
Full-text available
Accumulating evidence demonstrates that the number of social connections an individual has predicts health and wellbeing outcomes in people and nonhuman animals. In this report, we investigate the relationship between features of an individuals’ role within his social network and affective reactivity to ostensibly threatening stimuli, using a highl...
Preprint
Human population expansion into wildlife habitats has increased interest in the behavioral ecology of human-wildlife interactions. To date, however, the socio-ecological factors that determine whether, when or where wild animals take risks by interacting with humans and anthropogenic factors still remains unclear. We adopt a comparative approach to...
Article
With the global expansion of human populations, research on human-wildlife interactions (HWIs) has become increasingly important in conservation science. Despite its growing importance, such research faces challenges that include a bias towards evaluating wildlife- compared to human-related aspects of interactions, limited focus on the complexity o...
Article
Full-text available
Female reproductive success depends to a large extent on infants’ ability to survive to maturity. While most studies of female reproductive success have focused on the effects of individuals’ sociodemographic factors (e.g., age/parity, dominance rank) on offspring survival among wild primates living in less disturbed habitats, little research has f...
Article
Full-text available
Despite increasing conflict at human-wildlife interfaces, there exists little research on how the attributes and behavior of individual wild animals may influence human-wildlife interactions. Adopting a comparative approach, we examined the impact of animals' life-history and social attributes on interactions between humans and (peri)urban macaques...
Article
Full-text available
Members of a society interact using a variety of social behaviors, giving rise to a multi-faceted and complex social life. For the study of animal behavior, quantifying this complexity is critical for understanding the impact of social life on animals’ health and fitness. Multilayer network approaches, where each interaction type represents a diffe...
Conference Paper
Primates commonly engage in intergroup encounters (IGEs), ranging from peaceful displacement to intense aggression. While most of the studies in nonhuman primates have highlighted how groups tend to assess numerical asymmetries to determine whether to engage in intergroup conflict or not, the role of individual differences during IGEs is still poor...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives: In primates, allogrooming and other affiliative behaviors confer many benefits and may be influenced by many socioecological factors. Of these, the impact of anthropogenic factors remain relatively understudied. Here we ask whether interactions with humans decreased macaques' affiliative behaviors by imposing time-constraints, or incre...
Article
Social status impacts stress in primates, but the direction of the effect differs depending on species, social style, and group stability. This complicates our ability to identify broadly applicable principles for understanding how social status impacts health and fitness. One reason for this is the fact that social status is often measured as line...
Article
Due to primate adaptations for sociality, captive rhesus macaques have optimal welfare and utility as a biomedical model when they can be maintained in outdoor social groups. As a despotic species; however, aggression can result in costly injuries and may result in temporary or permanent removal of specific individuals from social housing. Enrichme...
Article
Full-text available
In primates, living in an anthropogenic environment can significantly improve an individual's fitness, which is likely attributed to access to anthropogenic food resources. However, in non-professionally provisioned groups, few studies have examined whether individual attributes, such as dominance rank and sex, affect primates' ability to access an...
Preprint
Full-text available
Positive social relationships in humans are known to have health promoting effects while negative social relationships have detrimental effects. Features of the broader social network, including indirect connections, also impact health. However, complicating our ability to examine these features, human networks are diverse and difficult to fully qu...
Preprint
Positive social relationships in humans are known to have health promoting effects while negative social relationships have detrimental effects. Features of the broader social network, including indirect connections, also impact health. However, complicating our ability to examine these features, human networks are diverse and difficult to fully qu...
Article
Full-text available
Time is a valuable but limited resource, and animals' survival depends on their ability to carefully manage the amount of time they allocate to each daily activity. While existing research has examined the ecological factors affecting animals' activity budgets, the impact of anthropogenic factors on urban-dwelling animals' time budgets remains unde...
Article
Full-text available
In social animals, affiliative behaviours bring many benefits, but also costs such as disease risk. The ways in which affiliation may affect the risk of infectious agent transmission remain unclear. Moreover, studies linking variation in affiliative interactions to infectious agent incidence/diversity have speculated that disease transmission may h...
Article
Full-text available
High-centrality nodes have disproportionate influence on the behavior of a network; therefore controlling such nodes can efficiently steer the system to a desired state. Existing multiplex centrality measures typically rank nodes assuming the layers are qualitatively similar. Many real systems, however, are comprised of networks heterogeneous in na...
Article
Full-text available
Keywords: anthropogenic environment humanewildlife interactions nonhuman primates social interactions stress time constraints Humans and their associated anthropogenic factors may strongly affect the demographics, activity and fragmentation of wild animal populations. Yet, the degree and nature of such impact on indicators of animals' social relati...
Preprint
High-centrality nodes have disproportionate influence on the behavior of a network; therefore controlling such nodes can efficiently steer the system to a desired state. Existing multiplex centrality measures typically rank nodes assuming the layers are qualitatively similar. Many real systems, however, are comprised of networks heterogeneous in na...
Article
Socially inflicted traumas are a major concern for the management of captive groups of rhesus macaques. Rhesus macaques are the most commonly used nonhuman primate in biomedical research, and social housing is optimal for promoting psychological well-being. However, trauma is frequent due to a strong reliance on aggression to establish and maintain...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives The impact of anthropogenic environmental changes may impose strong pressures on the behavioral flexibility of free-ranging animals. Here, we examine whether rates of interactions with humans had both a direct and indirect influence on the duration and distribution of social grooming in commensal rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). Mater...
Article
Full-text available
In group-living animals, heterogeneity in individuals’ social connections may mediate the sharing of microbial infectious agents. In this regard, the genetic relatedness of individuals’ commensal gut bacterium Escherichia coli may be ideal to assess the potential for pathogen transmission through animal social networks. Here we use microbial phylog...
Data
Bipartite matrix containing information on the bacterial DNA fingerprint profiles of macaques Row labels represent each individual macaque (243 in total), and column labels represent each of 66 band positions identified and optimized using automated analytical parameters to fit the dataset. Cells indicate either a presence (1) or absence (0) of a b...
Data
Dataset containing values of Newman’s modularity calculated for 1,000 permutations (100 iterations within each of 10%-100% sampling effort from the original dataset) of each behavioral network for each group
Data
Plots of the Newman’s eigenvector-based modularity of the grooming, huddling, and aggression network measures against % sampling effort for all three groups Data-points represent mean values computed from 1,000 networks (100 under each category of % sampling effort) permuted from each natural dataset, and error bars the standard deviations. Data-po...
Data
Definitions of social network measures computed for each group to establish adequacy in network sampling effort, using both the original data and from bootstrapped datasets of reduced degrees of sampling effort
Data
Multivariate MR-QAP regression models examining the effects of dyadic social behavioral interactions on the % genetic similarity of E. coli
Article
Full-text available
Among nonhuman primates, the evolutionary underpinnings of variation in social structure remain debated, with both ancestral relationships and adaptation to current conditions hypothesized to play determining roles. Here we assess whether interspecific variation in higher-order aspects of female macaque (genus: Macaca) dominance and grooming social...
Article
Biomedical facilities across the nation and worldwide aim to develop cost-effective methods for the reproductive management of macaque breeding groups, typically by housing macaques in large, multi-male multi-female social groups that provide monkey subjects for research as well as appropriate socialization for their psychological well-being. One o...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives Cercopithicine primates tend to have nepotistic hierarchies characterized by predictable, kinship-based dominance. Although aggression is typically directed down the hierarchy, insubordinate aggression does occur. Insubordination is important to understand because it can precipitate social upheaval and undermine group stability; however...
Article
Full-text available
Several, sometimes conflicting, explanatory frameworks have been put forward to posit inter- and intraspecific variation in non-human primate social relationships, particularly with regards to the emergence of the hierarchical structure, like the “prior attributes hypothesis” (i.e. through individuals’ intrinsic attributes), the “social dynamics hy...
Article
Conspecific aggression in outdoor-housed rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) at primate research facilities is a leading source of trauma and can potentially influence animal wellbeing and research quality. Although aggression between macaques is a normal part of daily social interactions, human presence might affect the frequency of various behaviors...
Article
Full-text available
In social animals, group living may impact the risk of infectious disease acquisition in two ways. On the one hand, social connectedness puts individuals at greater risk or susceptibility for acquiring enteric pathogens via contact-mediated transmission. Yet conversely, in strongly bonded societies like humans and some nonhuman primates, having clo...
Article
Full-text available
Background Although a wealth of literature points to the importance of social factors on health, a detailed understanding of the complex interplay between social and biological systems is lacking. Social status is one aspect of social life that is made up of multiple structural (humans: income, education; animals: mating system, dominance rank) and...
Data
Observed serum levels of Interleukin-6 (IL-6) relative to rank and dominance certainty for males and females. Raw values of IL-6. A and B depict effects for CRP for males and females, respectively. Separate lines represent different levels of dominance certainty.
Data
Observed serum levels of TNF-? relative to rank and dominance certainty. Raw values of TNF-? plotted against dominance rank. Separate lines represent different levels of dominance certainty.
Data
Observed serum levels of C-reactive protein relative to rank and dominance certainty for males and females. Raw values of CRP. A and B depict effects for CRP for males and females, respectively. Separate lines represent different levels of dominance certainty.
Article
Full-text available
Humans live in societies full of rich and complex relationships that influence health. The ability to improve human health requires a detailed understanding of the complex interplay of biological systems that contribute to disease processes, including the mechanisms underlying the influence of social contexts on these biological systems. A longitud...
Article
Full-text available
There has been a recent surge in research on primate infectious disease ecology. Two major areas remain relatively unaddressed to date—the prevalence of enteric bacterial parasites and the role of anthropogenic environmental factors in parasite acquisition in commensally living primate populations. In this preliminary assessment, we address both th...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives: Policing is a conflict-limiting mechanism observed in many primate species. It is thought to require a skewed distribution of social power for some individuals to have sufficiently high social power to stop others' fights, yet social power has not been examined in most species with policing behavior. We examined networks of subordinati...