Brianna Smart

Brianna Smart
University of Hertfordshire | UH · School of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics

PhD

About

16
Publications
942
Reads
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183
Citations
Citations since 2016
4 Research Items
170 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022010203040
Introduction
I am continuing my research in the extended ionized gas of the Magellanic System, with the ionized gas in the Magellanic Stream the next major focus of my study. In addition to my Magellanic research, I am helping with a data reduction pipeline for the MeerKAT survey to produce a large spectral index catalogue for the sources within the survey.

Publications

Publications (16)
Preprint
Full-text available
Observations with the Wisconsin H-alpha Mapper (WHAM) reveal a large, diffuse ionized halo that surrounds the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). We present the first kinematic H-alpha survey of an extended region around the galaxy, from (l,b) = (289.5,-35.0) to (315.1,-5.3) and covering +90 <= vLSR <= +210 km s-1. The ionized gas emission extends far be...
Article
We describe our spectroscopic follow-up to the Local Group Galaxy Survey (LGGS) photometry of M31 and M33. We have obtained new spectroscopy of 1895 stars, allowing us to classify 1496 of them for the first time. Our study has identified many foreground stars, and established membership for hundreds of early- and mid-type supergiants. We have also...
Article
Full-text available
Transits of exoplanets observed in the near-UV have been used to study the scattering properties of their atmospheres and possible star-planet interactions. We observed the primary transits of 15 exoplanets (CoRoT-1b, GJ436b, HAT-P-1b, HAT-P-13b, HAT-P-16b, HAT-P-22b, TrES-2b, TrES-4b, WASP-1b, WASP-12b, WASP-33b, WASP-36b, WASP-44b, WASP-48b, and...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The University of Arizona Astronomy Club has been working on two large group research projects since 2009. One research project is a transiting extrasolar project that is fully student led and run. We observed the transiting extrasolar planets , TrES-3b and TrES-4b, with the 1.55 meter Kuiper Telescope using different filters to test a proposed met...
Poster
The Large and Small Magellanic Clouds are two of the nearest galaxies to our own Milky Way, and have played important roles as astrophysical laboratories for understanding the stellar populations of galaxies. While they are known to be an interacting pair, they have always been viewed as distinct galaxies. In 2011, Olsen et al. made the surprising...
Article
Studying the magnetic fields of exoplanets allow for the investigation of their interior structure and rotation period, the presence of extrasolar moons, atmospheric retention, and potential habitability. We observed the primary transits of the hot Jupiters TrES-3b, WASP-12b, TrES-4b, WASP-26b, WASP-33b, HAT-P-1b, WASP-14b, HAT-P-6b, XO-2b, CoRoT-9...
Poster
The University of Arizona Astronomy Club has been using group research projects to enhance the learning experience of undergraduates in astronomy and related fields. Students work on two projects that employ a peer-mentoring system so they can learn crucial skills and concepts necessary in research environments. Students work on a transiting exopla...
Article
Full-text available
We observed nine primary transits of the hot Jupiter TrES-3b in several optical and near-UV photometric bands from 2009 June to 2012 April in an attempt to detect its magnetic field. Vidotto, Jardine and Helling suggest that the magnetic field of TrES-3b can be constrained if its near-UV light curve shows an early ingress compared to its optical li...
Article
We observed four primary transits of the transiting exoplanet WASP-12b with the Steward Observatory 1.55 meter Kuiper Telescope using near-UV and optical filters and with the UVW1 near-UV filter on NASA’s Swift satellite. It has been proposed that you can detect the magnetic field of a transiting exoplanet by observing asymmetries in their near-UV...
Article
Recent observations of transiting extrasolar planets in near-UV and optical bands, by Vidotto et al. 2011, suggest that asymmetries in light curve ingress times indicate the presence of a magnetic field. The University of Arizona Astronomy Club observed primary transits of extrasolar planet TrES-3b using the 1.55m Kuiper Telescope in the U, B, V, a...
Article
The Planck satellite is studying the power spectrum of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), and has found foreground contamination including dust emission from the Galaxy. The Planck Cold Core Team has been cataloging and characterizing this foreground emission. An initial catalog of over 10,000 objects, the Cold Core Census of Planck Objects (C3...
Article
Full-text available
The University of Arizona Astronomy Club has been working on two large group research projects since 2009. One research project is a transiting extrasolar planet project that is fully student led and run. We observed the transiting exoplanets, TrES-3b and TrES-4b, with the 1.55 meter Kupier Telescope in near-UV and optical filters in order to detec...
Article
Using the Steward Observatory 61" Kuiper Telescope, The University of Arizona Astronomy Club observed extrasolar planets TrES-3b and TrES-4b. We observed the planets with the Harris-B, V, and R filters as they transited their parent stars during the months of May-July 2009. The main goal of this project was to get undergraduates involved with a res...
Article
M31 and M33 are important galaxies to study when trying to understand stellar evolution. We observed 1,717 objects at the 6.5-m MMT using the 300-fiber fed spectrometer, Hectospec, in order to find massive stars in M31 and M33, of which 904 were from sources in M31 and M33. Of these sources, 129 O-type, 601 B-type supergiant, 81 A-type supergiant,...
Article
The l=29-31 line-of-sight in the plane of the Milky Way crosses two spiral arms, the edge of the molecular ring, and the end of the central Galactic bar. This direction was the initial target region of a survey of the Galactic plane at far-infrared wavelengths with the Herschel Space Observatory (HiGal). 554 1.1 mm continuum clumps have been identi...

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