Brian Winston

Brian Winston
University of Lincoln · College of the Arts

About

62
Publications
2,192
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
546
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 1974 - October 2017
University of Lincoln
Position
  • Professor

Publications

Publications (62)
Chapter
I am not here concerned with the fact that this event at Grover’s Mill did not happen; that it was, in fact, a fiction — that week’s Mercury Theater of the Air presentation on CBS directed by, and starring, Orson Welles. Fiction in the guise of news is unremarkable, after all: it is even to be found buried in the news itself. ‘Truth’, it should not...
Article
Brian Winston is a British screenwriter who focuses on documentaries; he won an Emmy Award in 1985 for his work on Heritage: Civilization and the Jews, Episode 8, ‘Out of the Ashes’ (1919–1947). Other credits include A Boatload of Wild Irishmen (2010). In his keynote address at the Screenwriting Research Network Potsdam conference in 2014, Winston,...
Article
Full-text available
The difficulties of representing national identity and cultural image in the mass media are universal. Are there, therefore, any universal general principles and techniques for the construction of hegemonically-robust cultural messages? It is suggested that there might be. Using the transmission of mass media messages in England during World War II...
Chapter
There is a consanguinity of surveillance and documentary which is here explored. Forensic experts depend on an assumption that the surveilled image can "speak for itself," but it cannot. I revisit the Halliday video of the Rodney King beating, a Nannycam "shaken baby" scandal, and the arguments about the evidence presented in the ethnographic class...
Article
What can be the significance of the 2014 Sight & Sound survey of the documentary archive?
Book
This resounding defence of the principles of free expression revisits the Satanic Verses uproar of 1989, as well as subsequent incidents such as the Danish cartoons controversy, to argue that the human right of free speech is by no means so secure that it can be taken for granted.
Chapter
The shot, made on March 3, 1991 starting at 12.52 a.m. (and 13 seconds), is taken from just over nine minutes of footage. It is night and the images are, for the most part, unsteady. Initially, and periodically thereafter, frames are somewhat out-of-focus. Although filmed on a color video camera, the picture is desaturated and it does not meet prof...
Chapter
The Satanic Verses affair was, in its formal structure, like a ‘nested’ story in The 1001 Nights where the teller of the tale encounters a character who tells a tale in which another character tells a tale and so on and so on. Circles within circles, encounter upon encounter; so, in fact, the story of this affair does not begin with the stone Khome...
Chapter
As this post-fatwa challenge fractured, contagiously, into a myriad of incidents, governments still largely eschewed any firm and comprehensive defence of free expression but, in the name of multiculturalism or social cohesion, accepted that outraged feelings needed to be assuaged even at the cost of undercutting the right of free speech. However,...
Chapter
On the evening of 13 February 1989, the Imam Ruhollah Khomeini, Supreme Leader of the Iranian Islamic Republic, dictated the following fatwa, a religious ruling or opinion, to a secretary: In the name of Him, the Highest. There is only one God to whom we shall all return. I inform all zealous Muslims of the world that the author of the book entitle...
Chapter
The Satanic Verses affair apparently claimed its first blood on 12 February 1989 when a crowd of around 10,000 attacked, as the nearest Western outpost to hand, the American Cultural Center in Islamabad. They did no damage beyond burning a Stars and Stripes. Five of them, though, were shot dead by the Pakistani police as well as one of the Center’s...
Chapter
Television is not very good at history.
Article
By the 1970s Frederick Wiseman had come to enjoy a unique position as the leading supplier of prestige documentaries to the Public Television network. He was ideally placed to take advantage of the upheavals then underway in public television provision. He was blessed with an enlightened commissioning executive and his own mastery of complex narrat...
Article
Full-text available
Taking as a case study the documentary Unknown White Male (UK, 2005) — a film whose theme and receptions problematizes stable notions of what constitutes subjectivity — a corrective is o¤ered to the dominant mode applying Peircean semiotics to the moving image. Cinema and media studies have tended to apply Peirce's triadic division of the sign in a...
Article
Professor Winston believes the HRA is beneficial to journalism, but writes: "The recent call by Conservative leader David Cameron for the repeal of the Human Rights Act is meaningless, as he does not propose stopping people appealing to the Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg, the procedure before the Act became law. But at least he does make oppor...
Article
Easy to read, and highly topical, Messages writes a history of mass communication in Europe and its outreaches, as a search for the origins of media forms from print and stage, to photography, film and broadcasting. Arguing that the development of the mass media has been an essential engine driving the western concept of an individual, Brian Winsto...
Article
In Emancipation, the Media and Modernity, Nicholas Garnham argues for the continued viability of the Enlightenment project, suggesting that, despite attacks from the right and various postmodernists, ‘coercive inequality and avoidable ignorance’ still require an enlightened response. Discarding history is an especially fraught outcome of the turn a...
Article
In the wake of the Daily Mirror's publication of "fake" pictures that led to the departure of editor Piers Morgan, Winston examines the history of photographic trickery and concludes: "The digital camera has fatally undercut the promise of photography as scientific evidence and editors cannot any longer totally rely on a photograph to bolster the v...
Article
Since the arrival of multi-channel television, there has been considerable debate about whether broadcasting still needs to be under the restraint of so much content regulation. Why should broadcast programmes be treated any differently from other forms of media content? Much of the debate has centred round the impartiality regulations, which some...
Article
In 1975, to contextualize its study of the reporting of trade union affairs on UK television news, the Glasgow Media Group analysed the content and presentational techniques of the bulletins transmitted on the three then-available national terrestrial channels.1 In 2001 the news output of the five major channels was sampled to provide a snapshot of...
Chapter
It was not until the 1920s that botanists solved the mystery of ‘broken’ tulips. The ‘break’ which caused a tulip bulb seemingly to blossom randomly with a second colour striping and feathering the bloom in a unique pattern is actually caused by a virus spread by aphids; but in the seventeenth century all that was known was that the outcome of a pl...
Article
Jack C. Ellis. John Grierson: Life, Contributions, Influence. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 2000. pp. 441.
Article
Full-text available
George Stoney's How The Myth Was Made (1979) points up some of the differences between the old and new documentaries. The film was motivated, Stoney relates, by his observation, while teaching at NYU, "that most of my students -- all children of the sixties and cinéma vérité -- are so dominated by that genre of filmmaking that they find it hard to...
Article
Eugene Volokh's argument is that 'speaking today is expensive' but that new technology will make it cheaper and that cheap speech will be more diverse and democratic. While it is quite clear that, indeed, today's speech is expensive, it seems to me that the rest of the argument is unconvincing.
Article
From the printing press on, all new technologies have had their democratic potential firmly suppressed. The Internet proves to be no exception
Article
MISUNDERSTANDING MEDIA by Brian Winston (New York: Oxford University Press, 1986---$22.50) SERVICES IN TRANSITION: THE IMPACT OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ON THE SERVICE SECTOR edited by Gerald Faulhaber, et al. (Cambridge, MA: Ballinger, 1986---$29.95) BUSINESS TELEMATICS: CORPORATE NETWORKS FOR THE INFORMATION AGE by Byron Belitsos and Jay Misra (Ho...
Article
Future Developments in Telecommunications, The Wired Society. Communication Satellite Systems, James Martin (Englewood Cliff N.J.: Prentice Hall, 1977, 1978, 1978)Art, The Artist, And The New Technologies The Third Wave Alvin Toffler (New York: William Morrow, 1980). Television's Transformation: The Next 25 Years Stuart M. DeLuca (San Diego ‐ New Y...

Network

Cited By