Brian D. Haley

Brian D. Haley
State University of New York College at Oneonta | SUNY Oneonta · Department of Anthropology

PhD

About

41
Publications
13,818
Reads
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244
Citations
Introduction
Brian D. Haley currently works at the Department of Anthropology , State University of New York College at Oneonta. Brian does research in Cultural Anthropology, Historical Anthropology and Cultural History. His current project is 'The Unexpected Histories Project: Conquests, Countercultures, and the Genesis of neo-Indian Identities.'
Additional affiliations
August 2013 - present
State University of New York College at Oneonta
Position
  • Professor (Full)
August 2006 - July 2013
State University of New York College at Oneonta
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
August 2000 - July 2006
State University of New York College at Oneonta
Position
  • Research Assistant
Education
September 1987 - December 1997
University of California, Santa Barbara
Field of study
  • Anthropology
September 1982 - June 1987
University of California, Santa Barbara
Field of study
  • Anthropology
September 1975 - December 1979
University of California, Santa Barbara
Field of study
  • Anthropology

Publications

Publications (41)
Article
In the 1970s, a network of families from Santa Barbara, California, asserted local indigenous identities as “Chumash.” However, we demonstrate that these families have quite different social histories than either they or supportive scholars claim. Rather than dismissing these neo-Chumash as anomalous “fakes,” we place their claims to Chumash identi...
Article
Full-text available
Anthropologists employ concepts of cultural persistence, indigenous resistance, and primitivist imagery which mystify their own roles in the construction of Chumash Indian identity and tradition in California. We attempt to demystify scholars’ remembering, forgetting, and imagining of the Chumash past that has helped to construct an influential Chu...
Article
Full-text available
Walter Goldschmidt’s seminal research in the 1940s on the social consequences of industrial agriculture has fostered a continuing critique of large-scale commodity agriculture. Goldschmidt concluded that larger farm size produced a lower quality of life in rural towns by increasing the proportion of low-wage workers and moving capital and profits e...
Article
This article explores Christian anarchist-pacifist Ammon Hennacy’s participation in Hopi politics and his role in popularizing a vision of Hopi culture among American radicals after World War II. Hennacy’s involvements at Hopi have largely escaped scholars’ attention, which is surprising, given that Hennacy has been recognized as one of “the spirit...
Preprint
Full-text available
This is the pre-publication version. A final published version appears in American Indian Quarterly 42(2): 215-245. If you want the published version, email me at brian.haley@oneonta.edu.
Preprint
Full-text available
Use of Erlandson's 1998 essay by those who promote neo-Chumash as Chumash amidst growing recognition of the extent of neo-Indianism makes it necessary to reveal additional flaws that undermine Erlandson's argument and his own damage to neo-Chumash ancestry claims.
Preprint
Full-text available
This is a sample chapter from my Unexpected Histories book project. I've been sitting on this for a few years. I'm posting it because I know there is interest and I want to give people a chance to provide feedback before it is finalized. Send comments or feedback to brian.haley@oneonta.edu.
Article
Full-text available
For the published version, go to https://muse.jhu.edu/journals/american_indian_quarterly/toc/aiq.40.1.html.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
I trace the fascination of the sixties’ counterculture with Hopi Indians of Arizona back to the 1940s and a self-described “Christian anarchist” named Ammon Hennacy. In doing so, I hope to illustrate the concept of unexpected histories, when a people's past refuses to be constrained by the category in which they envision themselves.
Book
Full-text available
Reimagining the Immigrant examines integrative practices of residents towards Mexican immigrants in a small farm town in America. This groundbreaking book sheds light on the coexisting practices of discrimination and accommodation and the ways in which immigrants and established residents reimagine ethnic identity in a more positive light.
Book
Full-text available
This collection gives voice to the peoples and groups impacted by globalization as they seek to negotiate their identities, language use, and territorial boundaries within a larger global context. Rather than viewing globalization as one-dimensional (i.e., cultural, economic, or political), the approaches taken by the authors reflect a nuanced and...
Chapter
Full-text available
Many observers of globalization have commented on the impact that global processes appear to be having on group identities. The changing loci of capital accumulation and power, the greater global flows of goods, labor, culture, and information, and the new global political and rhetorical conventions accompanying these changes, are having significan...
Article
Full-text available
Bear's Hiding Place: Ishi's Last Refuge. 1998. 18 minutes, color. video by Jed Riffe. For more information, contact University of California Extension, Center for Media and Independent Learning, 2000 Center Street. Fourth Floor, Berkeley. CA 94704.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
As North American archaeologists gravitate toward the collaborative mode of applied anthropology, they face new challenges. Professional authority is a key element of most collaborations, yet also can be why they fail. North American archaeologists are increasing their collaborations with indigenous groups, but encounter difficulty when their resul...
Article
I applaud Howard Campbell’s recent message that anthropologists ‘have the responsibility of interpreting “the constructionist” critiques of native culture to bureaucracies such as the BAR [Bureau of Acknowledgement Research] and showing how these critiques, rather than undermining Indian claims to tribal status, can be used in effective arguments f...
Article
Full-text available
Indian and Nation in Revolutionary Mexico. Alexander S. Dawson. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2004. 240 pp.
Article
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People often put history to uses that scholars do not anticipate. In Santa Barbara, descendants of 19th-century local resident Baltazar Ruiz relabeled him “Spanish” and later reinvented him as “Chumash.” Examination of this case reveals that one of Baltazar Ruiz’s ethnic identity changes is linked to a conflation of three Santa Barbara Baltazars by...
Article
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Recovering History, Constructing Race: The Indian, Black, and White Roots of Mexican Americans. Martha Menchaca. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2001. xi. 375 pp., maps, photographs, notes, bibliography, index.
Article
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Last year, Acta Americana readers were presented with an article by musician/poet/artist Theo Radiç, "The Chumash as the Keepers of the Western Gate.'" Radic' alleged that anthropologists - prominently including me - have conspired with government and industry to undermine the cultural validity of indigenous Chumash peoples of California's central...
Article
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Ce court article a pour objectif la defense de certaines analyses presentees lors d'un debat sur l'anthropologie et l'indigenisme en Californie face a la critique de l'anthropologue Les Field. Les AA. se sont interesses a la construction de l'identite ethnique des Chumash de la reserve de Santa Ynez en Californie a partir d'une reflexion sur l'ethn...
Article
Full-text available
The reading public has already been treated to wide-ranging opinions of anthropologist David Stoll's provocative and controversial new book, Rigoberta Menchfi and the Story of All Poor Guatemalans. 2 Most come from sympathetic defenders of Mench6, vexed academics, advocates of political correctness, rightwing polemicists, and the press, most of who...
Article
This paper explores relations between "identity" and "self"--concepts that tend to be approached separately in anthropological discourse. In the conceptualization of the self, the "Western" self, characterized as autonomous and egocentric, is generally taken as a point of departure. Non-Western (concepts of) selves-the selves of the people anthropo...
Article
Full-text available
This article reconsiders anthropologists' depictions of Chumash people's past beliefs regarding the journey of the soul to the land of the dead based on the ethnographic fieldnotes of J. P. Harrington. Included is an examination of the microfilmed original Harrington notes that have not been altered substantively by anthropologists' editing, as hav...
Article
Full-text available
A forum of commentaries on Haley and Wilcoxon's "Anthropology and the Making of Chumash Tradition" (Current Anthropology, 1997), and a response by Haley and Wilcoxon.
Thesis
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of California, Santa Barbara, 1997. Vita. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 333-344). Photocopy.
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report evaluates the eligibility of Point Conception, California and an irregularly defined area around it for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places as a "traditional cultural property." The work was performed in 1994 as a part of the environmental review process for the proposed California Commercial Spaceport. This was the fi...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
My current Unexpected Histories project examines the social and cultural roots of neo-Indian identities formed during the latter half of the twentieth century. Neo-Indians lack the ancestry and affiliation that their claims of Native American identity assume, so their social and cultural histories are fraught with paradoxical surprises. A knowledge of these unexpected histories sharpens our grasp of the nature of race/ethnicity, clarifying the socially constructed nature of ethnicity, and potentially overcoming the reluctance by scholars who are otherwise comfortable with constructivism to acknowledge that radical identity change is a significant reality. Unexpected Histories seeks answers to the how and why questions raised by radical identity change, and seeks insight into indigenism as an identity phenomenon and the conflicting roles and contradictions of post-colonial scholarship associated with the emergence of the multicultural state.