Brian Crane

Brian Crane

Doctor of Philosophy

About

10
Publications
727
Reads
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46
Citations
Citations since 2017
2 Research Items
13 Citations
201720182019202020212022202301234
201720182019202020212022202301234
201720182019202020212022202301234
201720182019202020212022202301234
Introduction
Brian Crane is currently an independent consultant. Brian does research in Archaeology. He is currently pursuing 3D recordation and visualization of archaeological resources. He has a particular interest in the early colonial history of New Sweden and the Delaware Valley.
Additional affiliations
April 2005 - February 2018
Versar
Position
  • Principal Investigator
May 1994 - April 2005
Parsons Corporation
Position
  • Principal Investigator
Education
September 1986 - August 1993
University of Pennsylvania
Field of study
  • Historical Archaeology
September 1982 - May 1986
University of Pennsylvania
Field of study
  • Anthropology

Publications

Publications (10)
Conference Paper
The use of 3D recordation and visualization techniques on archaeological sites has expanded dramatically in recent years. In response to the popularity of these technologies, European practitioners have developed the London Charter for the Computer-Based Visualization of Cultural Heritage as a foundation for best practices. This paper discusses the...
Conference Paper
The documentary record and archaeological resources of the Delaware valley present an excellent opportunity to explore the complex interactions among colonial settlers and their Lenape and Susquehannock neighbors. Historic ethnography envisions approaching the culture of a group of people at a specific place and time from as many documentary and ma...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This project presents best practices for the use of 3D visualization in DoD cultural resources projects. These practices will help the DoD promote and interpret the cultural resources under its care, increasing the support for and effectiveness of associated conservation efforts. Examples illustrating the best practices were developed for historic...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Hand-built, low-fired pottery from South Carolina exhibit a sometimes bewildering degree of heterogeneity. Analysis of vessel form, construction technique, temper inclusions, chemistry and surface treatment suggests a broad range of practice and potential cultural influence. Colonoware vessel forms and surface treatment display a complex blending o...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
As part of an alternative mitigation project associated with the Polk Tenant archaeological site, Versar archaeologists and historians gathered information on 58 previously excavated wells from across Delaware. Data collected included the shape of wells that have been found, the methods and materials used to construct them, and where the wells occu...
Article
Analysis of eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century earthenware sherds found on the site of the Heyward-Washington House in Charleston, South Carolina has provided important clues concerning the manufacture, trade and use of a poorly understood tradition of African American pottery. These hand built, low-fired earthenwares, which archaeologists ca...
Poster
Full-text available
Parsons Engineering Science used GIS technology and historical stream flow data to reconstruct seasonal variations in water supply at the Middleford Mills, Middleford, DE for the Delaware Department of Transportation. Using principals of hydraulics, key measurements for determining how well the mill complex avoided floods in springtime and harnesse...
Article
To the archaeologist, the refuse deposits found on domestic sites are a source of information about diet, health, and consumer behavior. Yet to 19th-century health reformers, these deposits were regarded as sources of disease causing offensive odors, or "noxious effluvia." Thus, city officials in Washington first instituted night soil collection (p...
Thesis
The low fired earthenwares of eighteenth and nineteenth century Charleston and San Juan are associated with African Americans and display a syncretic blend of technological and stylistic traditions from West Africa, Europe and the New World. The cultural contexts of their manufacture, distribution and use relate to processes in which African Americ...

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