Brian Buma

Brian Buma
University of Colorado | UCD · Department of Integrative Biology

Ph.D.

About

84
Publications
19,998
Reads
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1,620
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2014 - present
University of Alaska Fairbanks
Position
  • Affiliate Professor
July 2013 - present
University of Alaska Southeast
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
May 2013 - July 2013
University of Colorado Boulder
Position
  • Research Associate
Education
August 2008 - May 2013
University of Colorado Boulder
Field of study
  • Disturbance Ecology

Publications

Publications (84)
Preprint
Full-text available
Ecology and environmental science graduate degrees often involve fieldwork, frequently led by the graduate student. Few formal resources exist to support graduate students in successfully planning and implementing a data collection field campaign, even though this experience may be fundamental to completing a graduate degree. Graduate fieldwork req...
Article
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Fire is an integral component of ecosystems globally and a tool that humans have harnessed for millennia. Altered fire regimes are a fundamental cause and consequence of global change, impacting people and the biophysical systems on which they depend. As part of the newly emerging Anthropocene, marked by human-caused climate change and radical chan...
Article
The authors provide an initial report on possibly the southernmost expansion of humans in pre-industrial times. The archaeological site, in the Cape Horn archipelago, consists of a campfire site, fragments of a weapon, and butchered bones. Radiocarbon dating places the site c . 260–460 years BP.
Article
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Context Disturbance interactions can create compound, novel effects across landscapes compared to individual disturbance events. However, little consensus exists regarding which mechanisms are important for controlling the interaction of two disturbances with similar climatic forcings in subalpine spruce–fir forests. Objectives To investigate the...
Article
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Climate drivers are increasingly creating conditions conducive to higher frequency fires. In the coniferous boreal forest, the world’s largest terrestrial biome, fires are historically common but relatively infrequent. Post-fire, regenerating forests are generally resistant to burning (strong fire self-regulation), favoring millennial coniferous re...
Article
Cost-benefit analyses of salvage logging have generally focused on large-scale, landscape disturbances salvaged at high intensity, and there is limited research on the ecological and economic outcomes of low-intensity salvage implemented for the benefit of forest-dependent communities. Here, we assess the potential impacts of small-scale, single-tr...
Article
La Reserva de Biosfera Cabo de Hornos (RBCH) alberga una biodiversidad y tipos de ecosistemas únicos a nivel mundial. Éstos han sido mucho menos estudiados que sus homólogos, los ecosistemas subpolares del hemisferio norte. El objetivo de este trabajo es presentar por primera vez una detallada descripción de los marcados gradientes climáticos de la...
Article
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Landslides, a forest disturbance, mobilize carbon (C) sequestered in vegetation and soils. Mobilized C is deposited either onto hillslopes or into the water, sequestering C from and releasing C to the atmosphere at different time scales. The C‐dense old‐growth temperate forests of SE Alaska are a unique location to quantify C mobilization rate by f...
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1. Disturbances are a key part of ecosystem dynamics at multiple scales. They can maintain ephemeral habitat, alter local and landscape biodiversity, drive carbon balance changes, and trigger whole ecosystem regime shifts. Yet there are few theories and only limited frameworks underlying disturbance ecology by which scientists and practitioners can...
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How climate change may affect land-sea linkages along the Pacific Coast and the ecological consequences of these changes for marine food webs and ecosystem processes .
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Abstract Increasing rates of short‐interval disturbances have the potential to rapidly transform ecosystems via shifts in post‐disturbance regeneration. While research has explored compound events in multiple biomes, we know little regarding how local site conditions interact with short‐interval disturbances to influence post‐disturbance regenerati...
Article
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Coastal margins are important areas of materials flux that link terrestrial and marine ecosystems. Consequently, climate-mediated changes to coastal terrestrial ecosystems and hydrologic regimes have high potential to influence nearshore ocean chemistry and food web dynamics. Research from tightly coupled, high-flux coastal ecosystems can advance u...
Article
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Aim Climate change poses significant challenges for tree species, which are slow to adapt and migrate. Insight into genetic and phenotypic variation under current landscape conditions can be used to gauge persistence potential to future conditions and determine conservation priorities, but landscape effects have been minimally tested in trees. Here...
Article
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Citation: Buma, B., and Ł. Pawlik. 2021. Post-landslide soil and vegetation recovery in a dry, montane system is slow and patchy. Ecosphere 12(1): Abstract. Landslides are common disturbances in forests around the world, and a major threat to human life and property. Landslides are likely to become more common in many areas as storms intensify. For...
Article
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Las reservas de la biosfera tienen entre sus funciones apoyar la investigación científica, educación, capacitación y monitoreo. En la Reserva de la Biosfera Cabo de Hornos (RBCH), creada el año 2005, estas funciones se han cumplido desde la conformación del Parque Etnobotánico Omora el año 2000 y con su implementación, el año 2008, como sitio co-fu...
Article
After natural forest disturbances such as wildfires, windstorms and insect outbreaks, salvage logging is commonly applied to reduce economic losses and mitigate subsequent disturbance risk. However, this practice is controversial due to its potential ecological impacts, and its capacity to mitigate or increase the risk of subsequent disturbances re...
Article
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The world's southernmost tree has been documented along with the condition and growth pattern of the world's southernmost forest on Isla Hornos, Chile. The distribution of trees at broad scales is strongly influenced by the abiotic environment and determining the position and condition of tree limits around the world is an important way to monitor...
Article
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Evolution of terrestrial plants, the first vascular plants, the first trees, and then whole forest ecosystems had far reaching consequences for Earth system dynamics. These innovations are considered important moments in the evolution of the atmosphere, biosphere, and oceans, even if the effects might have lagged by hundreds of thousands or million...
Article
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Wildfires are a significant agent of disturbance in forests and highly sensitive to climate change. Short-interval fires and high severity (mortality-causing) fires in particular, may catalyze rapid and substantial ecosystem shifts by eliminating woody species and triggering conversions from forest to shrub or grassland ecosystems. Modeling and fin...
Article
Disturbances (e.g. fires, floods, windstorms, landslides, and tsunamis) are ubiquitous throughout the world. Many social and ecological systems have resilience mechanisms to accommodate and recover from such events. Yet, in an era of directional climate change, adaptation (rather than recovery to the same state) may be the most logical path. In suc...
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Due to their potentially long runout, debris flows are a major hazard and an important geomorphic process in mountainous environments. Understanding runout is therefore essential to minimize risk in the near‐term and interpret the pace and pattern of debris flow erosion and deposition over geomorphic time scales. Many debris flows occur in forested...
Article
This is the first study to generate and analyze the climate signal in blue intensity (BI) tree-ring chronologies from Alaska yellow-cedar (Callitropsis nootkatensis (D. Don) Oerst. ex D.P. Little). The latewood BI chronology shows a much stronger temperature sensitivity than ring width and can thus provide information on past climate. The well-repl...
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The study of community succession is one of the oldest pursuits in ecology. Challenges remain in terms of evaluating the predictability of succession and the reliability of the chronosequence methods typically used to study community development. The research of William S. Cooper in Glacier Bay National Park is an early and well‐known example of su...
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Record-breaking fire seasons are becoming increasingly common worldwide, and large wildfires are having extraordinary impacts on people and property, despite years of investments to support social–ecological resilience to wildfires. This has prompted new calls for land management and policy reforms as current land and fire management approaches hav...
Article
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Climate change is altering the conditions for tree recruitment, growth, and survival, and impacting forest community composition. Across southeast Alaska, USA, and British Columbia, Canada, Callitropsis nootkatensis (Alaska yellow‐cedar) is experiencing extensive climate change‐induced canopy mortality due to fine‐root death during soil freezing ev...
Article
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Resilience has become a common goal for science-based natural resource management, particularly in the context of changing climate and disturbance regimes. Integrating varying perspectives and definitions of resilience is a complex and often unrecognized challenge to applying resilience concepts to social-ecological systems (SESs) management. Using...
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The coastal temperate rainforests of South and North America are part of the most biomass dense forest biome on the planet. They are also subject to rapid climatic shifts and, subsequently, new disturbance processes – snow loss-driven mortality and the emergence of fire in historically non-fire-exposed areas. Here, we compare and contrast Southern...
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Disturbance regimes have a major influence on the baseline carbon that characterizes any particular ecosystem. Often regimes result in lower average regional baseline C (compared to those same systems if the disturbance processes were lessened/removed). However, in infrequently disturbed systems the role of disturbance as a “background” process tha...
Data
Direct correlations between disturbance and biomass. Wind exposure and landslide exposure compared to the biomass variables: Tree density, biomass, and basal area. Red line represents a simple linear regression to show trends. (PDF)
Article
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Accurate soil organic carbon (SOC) maps are needed to predict the terrestrial SOC feedback to climate change, one of the largest remaining uncertainties in Earth system modeling. Over the last decade, global scale models have produced varied predictions of the size and distribution of SOC stocks, ranging from 1000 to >3000 Pg of C within the top 1...
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Context Predicting ecosystem resilience is a challenge, especially as climate change alters disturbance regimes and conditions for recovery. Recent research has highlighted the importance of spatially-explicit disturbance and resilience processes to long-term ecosystem dynamics. “Neoecological” approaches characterize resilience mechanisms at relat...
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Increasing evidence indicates that forest disturbances are changing in response to global change, yet local variability in disturbance remains high. We quantified this considerable variability and analyzed whether recent disturbance episodes around the globe were consistently driven by climate, and if human influence modulates patterns of forest di...
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The potential for climate change to cause mass tree mortality in forested systems by pushing environmental conditions past physiological tolerance thresholds is well documented. Less well studied is damage and mortality associated with climatic transitions, where mortality is less on either side of the transition; the shift from freezing winter con...
Article
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The scale of investigation for disturbance-influenced processes plays a critical role in theoretical assumptions about stability, variance, and equilibrium, as well as conservation reserve and long-term monitoring program design. Critical consideration of scale is required for robust planning designs, especially when anticipating future disturbance...
Article
In an era of rapid climate change, understanding the natural capacity of species' ranges to track shifting climatic niches is a critical research and conservation need. Because species do not move across the landscape through empty space, but instead have to migrate through existing biotic communities, basic dispersal ecology and biotic interaction...
Article
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Spatial patterns at multiple observation scales provide a framework to improve understanding of pattern-related phenomena. However, the metrics that are most sensitive to local patterns are least likely to exhibit consistent scaling relations with increasing extent (observation scale). A conceptual framework based on multiscale domains (i.e., geogr...
Article
To explore the recent (past ~1,000 year) migration history of yellow-cedar (Callitropsis nootkatensis), a climate-threatened tree, which appears to lag behind its potential climatic niche at a leading northern range edge, and infer its continued migration potential under changing climate. Southeast Alaska, USA. We located 11 leading range edge yell...
Article
Aquatic Carbon Biogeochemistry of the Pacific Coastal Temperate Rainforest Region Workshop; Seattle, Washington, 7–10 February 2017
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Water is one of the most critical resources derived from natural systems. While it has long been recognized that forest disturbances like fire influence watershed streamflow characteristics, individual studies have reported conflicting results with some showing streamflow increases post-disturbance and others decreases, while other watersheds are i...
Article
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Understanding plant community succession is one of the original pursuits of ecology, forming some of the earliest theoretical frameworks in the field. Much of this was built on the long-term research of William S. Cooper, who established a permanent plot network in Glacier Bay, Alaska, in 1916. This study now represents the longest-running primary...
Article
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In their analysis of resampled and remeasured plot data from the USDA Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program, Barrett and Pattison (2017, Can. J. For. Res. 47(1): 97–105, doi: 10.1139/cjfr-2016-0335 ) suggest that there is neither evidence of a recent regional decrease in yellow-cedar (Callitropsis nootkatensis (D. Don) Oerst. e...
Article
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Climate change is causing rapid changes to forest disturbance regimes worldwide. While the consequences of climate change for existing disturbance processes, like fires, are well studied, emerging drivers of disturbance such as snow loss and subsequent mortality are much less documented. As the climate warms, a transition from winter snow to rain i...
Article
The goal of this study was to use watershed characteristics derived from light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data to predict stream biogeochemistry in Perhumid Coastal Temperate Rainforest (PCTR) watersheds. Over a 2-day period, we sampled 37 streams for concentrations of dissolved C, N, P, major cations, and measures of dissolved organic matter qu...
Article
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Landscape ecology is a discipline that explicitly considers the influence of time and space on the environmental patterns we observe and the processes that create them. Although many of the topics studied in landscape ecology have public policy implications, three are of particular concern: climate change; land use–land cover change (LULCC); and a...
Article
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Disturbances affect almost all terrestrial ecosystems, but it has been difficult to identify general principles regarding these influences. To improve our understanding of the long-term consequences of disturbance on terrestrial ecosystems, we present a conceptual framework that analyzes disturbances by their biogeochemical impacts. We posit that t...
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Temperate rainforests are the most carbon dense forest ecosystem on the planet, with C stocks several times higher than most other forested biomes. While climatic and disturbance drivers of these C stocks are relatively well explored, the spatial distribution of those stocks at the scale of entire watersheds is less well known, particularly in perh...
Article
Landscape ecology is a discipline that explicitly considers the influence of time and space on the environmental patterns we observe and the processes that create them. Although many of the topics studied in landscape ecology have public policy implications, three are of particular concern: climate change; land use–land cover change (LULCC); and a...
Article
Full-text available
There is growing concern that a warming climate will alter water supplies in many regions. Determining the best course of management and adaptation is an important task for water managers. This study explores the impact of climate warming and differing treeplanting scenarios on water supplies (peak flow rates, times, and total water yield) in four...
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Disturbances are fundamental components of ecosystems and, in many cases, a dominant driver of ecosystem structure and function at multiple spatial and temporal scales. While the effect of any one disturbance may be relatively well understood, multiple interacting disturbances can cause unexpected disturbance behavior (e.g., larger extents), altere...
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Natural forest growth and expansion are important carbon sequestration processes globally. Climate change is likely to increase forest growth in some regions via CO2 fertilization, increased temperatures, and altered precipitation, however altered disturbance regimes and climate stress (e.g., drought) will act to reduce carbon stocks in forests as...
Article
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Interactions between ecological disturbances have the potential to alter other disturbances and their associated regimes, such as the likelihood, severity, and extent of events. The influence of exposure to wind and yellow cedar decline on the landslide regime of Alaskan temperate rainforests was explored using presence-only modeling techniques. Th...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Climate change is already altering disturbance regimes around the world. Fire regimes are directly affected; as the climate warms and precipitation is redistributed, many areas will see large increases or decreases in fire likelihood, intensity, severity, and extent. Serotiny, the retention of seeds in the canopy of veg...