Brett Heasman

Brett Heasman
York St John University · School of Education, Language and Psychology

PhD in Psychological and Behavioural Science (LSE)

About

16
Publications
2,986
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256
Citations
Introduction
My research investigates enabling environments for autistic people. It focusses on social, cultural and technological factors.

Publications

Publications (16)
Article
Full-text available
This article examines 181 autistic adults’ views toward, and experiences of, requesting and receiving workplace adjustments in the UK. Using an online survey, we collected both qualitative and quantitative data relating to individuals’ experiences. While the majority of participants perceived workplace adjustments to be important, many were not rec...
Article
Full-text available
Lay abstract: Autistic people can find it difficult to find and keep a job, and fewer autistic people are employed compared with people from other disability groups. There is not enough research in this area, especially research that directly compares the experiences of autistic and non-autistic colleagues starting in an organisation at the same t...
Article
Full-text available
Autism affects how someone makes sense of the world around them. About 1–2% of people are autistic. You might have an autistic classmate or family member, or maybe you are autistic. Autistic people might communicate differently than people who are not autistic. This means that it can be difficult for other people to understand what autistic people...
Article
Background: Autistic individuals face challenges in the workplace, particularly related to social communication. Diagnostic disclosure may mitigate these challenges, but it also exposes individuals to potential discrimination. This study aimed to share the diagnostic disclosure experiences of autistic adults in the workplace to help employers bette...
Article
Full-text available
Lay abstract: Despite possessing valuable skills, differences in the way that autistic people understand and respond to others in social situations mean that they are frequently disadvantaged in job interviews. We examined how autistic and non-autistic adults compared on standard (unmodified) job interview questions, and then used these findings t...
Chapter
Perspective-taking is a routine and seemingly intuitive part of our everyday social life, yet at the same time, it is a difficult phenomenon to describe, conceptualize, and enhance. This entry considers (1) ways of conceptualizing the primary elements of perspective-taking; (2) reframing perspective-taking as an interactional achievement rather tha...
Article
Do autistic people read autistic behavior in the same way as neurotypical observers? We consider evidence that suggests autistic-to-autistic interactions demonstrate enabling norms and question the possibilities for neurotypical researchers to learn from autistic social appraisal.
Article
Full-text available
Research on how autistic people are perceived by neurotypical people indicates that disclosing a diagnosis leads to a positive discriminatory bias; however, autobiographical autistic accounts indicate that diagnostic disclosure often results in negative discriminatory behaviour. We report on an exploratory study to compare people’s self-reported he...
Thesis
Research on autism, which is defined as a life-long developmental disability affecting social interaction, has focussed predominantly on how autistic individuals perceive and interact with others with less emphasis on the perspectives of their interactional partners. Yet autistic viewpoints have highlighted how other people are part of a two-way br...
Article
Full-text available
Autistic people are neurologically divergent, yet approaches to studying autism are framed by neurotypical definitions of being social. Using the concept of intersubjectivity, which conceptualises a variety of ways of socially relating, we investigate distinctive features of how autistic people build social understanding. A total of 30 members of a...
Chapter
The double empathy problem (DEP) refers to a “disjuncture in reciprocity between two differently disposed social actors” who hold different norms and expectations of each other, such as is common in autistic to non-autistic social interactions (Milton 2012: 884). With different dispositional outlooks and personal conceptual understandings, interact...
Chapter
There is a false opposition between imagination and materiality, with the former being seen as ephemeral and subjective, while the latter is seen as 'real' and objective. This opposition tends to obscure the fact that imagination both relies upon very real and material technologies and also often has very real consequences. The aim of the present c...
Article
Full-text available
Misunderstandings are social in nature, always having two sides. Yet the misunderstandings experienced by people with Asperger's syndrome are usually studied in terms of the individual with a diagnosis, with less emphasis on social relations. We use a two-sided methodology to map out misunderstandings within 22 dyads (n = 44) consisting of people w...
Chapter
The aim of this chapter is to understand how the imagination of the self is mediated by cultural technologies, showing how major new inventions (such as language, writing, digitization) qualitatively change the ways in which we imagine ourselves. First, the authors look at how technology can support cognition in general and imagination specifically...
Article
The contribution of qualitative methods to evidence-based medicine is growing, with qualitative studies increasingly used to examine patient experience and unsafe organizational cultures. The present review considers qualitative research recently conducted on teamwork and organizational culture in the ICU and also other acute domains. Qualitative s...

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