Brent Strickland

Brent Strickland
Institut Jean Nicod · Cognitive Science

PhD

About

48
Publications
12,138
Reads
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696
Citations
Additional affiliations
October 2016 - December 2016
Institut Jean Nicod
Position
  • CNRS Researcher
August 2013 - August 2015
French National Centre for Scientific Research
Position
  • PostDoc Position
August 2008 - August 2013
Yale University
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (48)
Article
Full-text available
A Correction to this paper has been published: https://doi.org/10.1007/s13164-021-00559-0
Article
Full-text available
The idea that the form of a word reflects information about its meaning has its roots in Platonic philosophy, and has been experimentally investigated for concrete, sensory-based properties since the early 20th century. Here, we provide evidence for an abstract property of ‘boundedness’ that introduces a systematic, iconic bias on the phonological...
Article
Full-text available
Responding to recent concerns about the reliability of the published literature in psychology and other disciplines, we formed the X-Phi Replicability Project (XRP) to estimate the reproducibility of experimental philosophy (osf.io/dvkpr). Drawing on a representative sample of 40 x-phi studies published between 2003 and 2015, we enlisted 20 researc...
Article
Full-text available
Appendix 1 was incomplete in the initial online publication. The original article has been corrected.
Article
Imagine you see a video of someone pulling back their leg to kick a soccer ball, and then a soccer ball soaring toward a goal. You would likely infer that these scenes are two parts of the same event, and this inference would likely cause you to remember having seen the moment the person kicked the soccer ball, even if that information was never ac...
Preprint
The idea that the form of a word reflects information about its meaning has its roots in Platonic philosophy, and has been experimentally investigated for concrete, sensory based semantic properties since the early 20th century. Here, we provide evidence for an abstract, semantic property of ‘boundedness’ that introduces a systematic, iconic bias o...
Article
From an early age, humans intuitively expect physical objects to obey core principles, including continuity (objects follow spatiotemporally continuous paths) and solidity (two solid objects cannot occupy the same space at the same time). These 2 principles are sometimes viewed as deriving from a single overarching "persistence" principle. Indeed,...
Preprint
From an early age, humans intuitively expect physical objects to obey core principles, including continuity (objects follow spatiotemporally continuous paths) and solidity (two solid objects cannot occupy the same space at the same time). These two principles are sometimes viewed as deriving from a single overarching “persistence” principle. Indeed...
Preprint
Full-text available
For scientific theories grounded in empirical data, replicability is a core principle, for at least two reasons. First, unless we accept to have scientific theories rest on the authority of a small number of researchers, empirical studies should be replicable, in the sense that its methods and procedure should be detailed enough for someone else to...
Preprint
Full-text available
For scientific theories grounded in empirical data, replicability is a core principle, for at least two reasons. First, unless we accept to have scientific theories rest on the authority of a small number of researchers, empirical studies should be replicable, in the sense that its methods and procedure should be detailed enough for someone else to...
Article
A crucial component of event recognition is understanding event roles, i.e. who acted on whom: boy hitting girl is different from girl hitting boy. We often categorize Agents (i.e. the actor) and Patients (i.e. the one acted upon) from visual input, but do we rapidly and spontaneously encode such roles even when our attention is otherwise occupied?...
Article
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As political polarization grows, the arguments we have with one another may be shifting our understanding of truth itself
Article
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Recent research in infant cognition and adult vision suggests that the mechanical object relationships may be more salient and naturally attention grabbing than similar but non-mechanical relationships. Here we examine two novel sources of evidence from language related to this hypothesis. In Experiments 1 and 2, we show that adults preferentially...
Data
Experiment 1. Includes all data for Experiment 1. (XLS)
Data
Experiment 2. Includes all data for Experiment 2. (XLS)
Data
Experiment 3. Includes all data for Experiment 3. (XLSX)
Data
Experiment 4. Includes all data for Experiment 4. (XLSX)
Article
When object A moves adjacent to a stationary object, B, and in that instant A stops moving and B starts moving, people irresistibly see this as an event in which A causes B to move. Real-world causal collisions are subject to Newtonian constraints on the relative speed of B following the collision, but here we show that perceptual constraints on th...
Article
We conducted five sets of experiments asking whether psychological and physical events are construed in broadly different manners concerning the underlying textures of their causes. In Experiments 1a–1d, we found a robust tendency to estimate fewer causes (but not effects) for psychological than for physical events; Experiment 2 showed a similar pa...
Article
Developmental psychology currently faces a deep puzzle: most children before 4 years of age fail elicited-response false-belief tasks, but preverbal infants demonstrate spontaneous false-belief understanding. Two main strategies are available: cultural constructivism and early-belief understanding. The latter view (unlike the former) assumes that f...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
A crucial component of event recognition is understanding the roles that people and objects take: did the boy hit the girl, or did the girl hit the boy? We often make these categorizations from visual input, but even when our attention is otherwise occupied, do we automatically analyze the world in terms of event structure? In two experiments, part...
Article
Goldin-Meadow & Brentari (G-M&B) argue that, for sign language users, gesture – in contrast to linguistic sign – is iconic, highly variable, and similar to spoken language co-speech gesture. We discuss two examples (telicity and absolute gradable adjectives) that challenge the use of these criteria for distinguishing sign from gesture.
Article
Full-text available
We present experimental evidence that people's modes of social interaction influence their construal of truth. Participants who engaged in cooperative interactions were less inclined to agree that there was an objective truth about that topic than were those who engaged in a competitive interaction. Follow-up experiments ruled out alternative expla...
Article
The underlying structures that are common to the world's languages bear an intriguing connection with early emerging forms of "core knowledge" (Spelke & Kinzler, 2007), which are frequently studied by infant researchers. In particular, grammatical systems often incorporate distinctions (e.g., the mass/count distinction) that reflect those made in c...
Poster
Full-text available
Infant looking-time results (Spelke, 1994) have shown that pre-verbal infants grasp the continuity principle (i.e. that objects cannot pop in and out of existence) and the solidity principle (i.e. that solid objects cannot pass through one-another) from around 3 months of age. Early theories assimilated both by treating solidity as resulting from a...
Article
Full-text available
According to a theoretical tradition dating back to Aristotle, verbs can be classified into two broad categories. Telic verbs (e.g., "decide," "sell," "die") encode a logical endpoint, whereas atelic verbs (e.g., "think," "negotiate," "run") do not, and the denoted event could therefore logically continue indefinitely. Here we show that sign langua...
Article
Recent infant cognition research suggests that core knowledge involves event-type representations: During perception, the mind automatically categorizes physical events into broad types (e.g., occlusion and containment), which then guide attention to different properties (e.g., with width processed at a younger age than height in containment events...
Article
One of the most remarkable features of human perception is its ability to represent causation. Here we demonstrate that causal perception is sensitive to certain physical regularities in collision events that result from Newtonian mechanics. Consider two balls, A and B, with A moving towards B at 1 m/s and B at rest. When A is with B, A stops movin...
Article
The tendency to over-interpret events of daily life as resulting from voluntary or intentional actions is one of the key aspects of schizophrenia with persecutory delusions. Here, we ask whether this characteristic may emerge from the abnormal activity of a basic cognitive process found in healthy adults and children: the intentionality bias, which...
Article
Full-text available
We address the puzzle about early belief ascription: young children fail elicited-response false-belief tasks, but they demonstrate spontaneous false-belief understanding. Based on recent converging evidence, we articulate a pragmatic framework to solve this puzzle. Young children do understand the contents of others' false belief, but they are ove...
Article
Full-text available
Experimenter bias occurs when scientists' hypotheses influence their results, even if involuntarily. Meta-analyses have suggested that in some domains, such as psychology, up to a third of the studies could be unreliable due to such biases. A series of experiments demonstrates that while people are aware of the possibility that scientists can be mo...
Article
Full-text available
It has long been known that scientists have a tendency to conduct experiments in a way that brings about the expected outcome. Here, we provide the first direct demonstration of this type of experimenter bias in experimental philosophy. Opposed to previously discovered types of experimenter bias mediated by face-to-face interactions between experim...
Article
Recent infant cognition research suggests that the mind reflexively categorizes dynamic visual input into representations of "event types" (such as occlusion or containment), which then prioritize attention to relevant visual features - e.g. prioritizing attention to the dimension (height vs. width) that predicts whether a rectangular object will f...
Article
Full-text available
At the core of Gray, Young, and Waytz’s fascinating and wide-ranging target article is the idea that people understand morally charged events in terms of two basic roles. On one hand, there is an agent who intentionally brings about an outcome; on the other, there is a patient who suffers that outcome’s effects. Much of the article is devoted to wo...
Article
Full-text available
In studying how lay people evaluate arguments, psychologists have typically focused on logical form and content. This emphasis has masked an important yet under appreciated aspect of every day argument evaluation: social cues to argument strength. Here, we focus on the ways in which observers evaluate arguments by the reaction they evoke in an audi...
Article
Full-text available
The extant literature on discourse comprehension distinguishes between two types of texts: narrative and expository (Steen, 1999). Narrative discourse tells readers a story by giving them an account of events; the narration informs and/or persuades the readership by using textual elements such as theme, plot, and characters. Expository discourse ex...
Article
We present novel evidence that implicit causal inferences distort memory for events only seconds after viewing. Adults watched videos of someone launching (or throwing) an object. However, the videos omitted the moment of contact (or release). Subjects falsely reported seeing the moment of contact when it was implied by subsequent footage but did n...
Article
The visual system segments dynamic visual input into discrete event representations, but these are typically considered to be token representations, wherein particular events are picked out by universal segmentation routines. In contrast, recent infant cognition research by Renee Baillargeon and others suggests that our core knowledge of the world...
Article
Full-text available
Following Almor's (1999) cost-function analysis of referential processing, we hypothesized that reading times of metaphoric anaphors are affected by readers' working memory ability and reflect a balance between discourse function and processing cost. The results from 2 self-paced reading experiments supported this hypothesis. Low-span participants...
Article
Full-text available
The notion of a "thematic role" has been an important one in linguistic theories concerning the syntax/semantics interface (Fillmore, 1968), but their effects on high-level cognition remain relatively unexplored. Thematic roles,like AGENT and PATIENT, are said to be linked with specific grammatical positions like that of "subject" and "direct objec...

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