Brendan Burchell

Brendan Burchell
University of Cambridge | Cam · Department of Sociology

Professor

About

104
Publications
49,112
Reads
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3,033
Citations
Introduction
Research interests include the effects of labour market experiences on psychological well-being, work intensification and job insecurity; predictors and correlates of the transition into self-employment; managers' and employees' different perspectives on jobs, part-time work and gender differences in working conditions and careers, restless leg syndrome and financial phobia.
Skills and Expertise
Additional affiliations
September 1985 - present
University of Cambridge
Position
  • Professor (Full)

Publications

Publications (104)
Article
Full-text available
Two recent surveys have reported widely differing prevalence rates for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) within the U.K. police force. Stevelink et al. (2020) reported a rate of 3.9% whereas a survey conducted for the charity Police Care UK reported a rate of 20.6%. In this comment we discuss how definitions and methodological factors can impact...
Article
Full-text available
Recent debates about whether the standard full-time working week (35-40 h) can be replaced by a shorter working week have received extensive attention. Using 2015 European Working Conditions Survey data, this study contributes to these debates by exploring the relationships between job quantity, job quality and employees' mental health. Overall, we...
Article
Full-text available
David Graeber’s ‘bullshit jobs theory’ has generated a great deal of academic and public interest. This theory holds that a large and rapidly increasing number of workers are undertaking jobs that they themselves recognise as being useless and of no social value. Despite generating clear testable hypotheses, this theory is not based on robust empir...
Article
Full-text available
One in five UK police officers suffers from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder or Complex Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, yet there is no gold standard measure of trauma exposure available. This study coded 4,987 exposures reported by 1,531 UK police officers, using their own language. The resulting checklist describes over 70% of typical ‘worst’ repor...
Article
Full-text available
Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common neurological sensorimotor disorder often described as an unpleasant sensation associated with an urge to move the legs. Here we report findings from a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of RLS including 480,982 Caucasians (cases = 10,257) and a follow up sample of 24,977 (cases = 6,651). We con...
Article
Full-text available
Swift trust has long been considered of critical importance to the work of project teams and other forms of temporary organizing, but research has remained heavily fragmented in regard to its antecedents or bases. This contribution conducts a systematic review of the literature and derives from it seven possible bases of swift trust. The relative s...
Article
Full-text available
Background: We investigated work-related exposure to stressful and traumatic events in police officers, including repeated exposure to traumatic materials, and predicted that ICD-11 complex PTSD (CPTSD) would be more prevalent than posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The effects of demographic variables on exposure and PTSD were examined, along...
Article
Full-text available
Active Labour Market Programmes (ALMPs), which form important components of employment support policies around the world, have been found to improve mental health and wellbeing of participants. However, it remains unclear how these health effects compare with the effects of different types of employment for men and women. Using 1991–2019 panel data...
Article
Full-text available
This article makes a significant empirical contribution to our understanding of why people in the United Kingdom without childcare responsibilities actively reduce or limit the amount of time they spend in paid employment. We show how the negative aspects of employment (push factors) and the desire to spend time in more varied and enjoyable ways (p...
Article
Full-text available
Existing urban research has focused on gender differences in commuting patterns to and from homes, but has paid little attention to the gendered diversity in the spatiotemporal patterns of work. The increase in remote working and information and communications technology (ICT) work has been emphasised, but at the cost of exploring the full range of...
Conference Paper
Existing urban research has focused on gender differences in commuting patterns to and from homes but paid little attention to the gendered diversity in the spatial-temporal patterns of work. The increase in remote working and information and communications technology (ICT) work have been emphasised, but at the cost of exploring the full range of w...
Article
Full-text available
Background: The INTERVAL trial showed that, over a 2-year period, inter-donation intervals for whole blood donation can be safely reduced to meet blood shortages. We extended the INTERVAL trial for a further 2 years to evaluate the longer-term risks and benefits of varying inter-donation intervals, and to compare routine versus more intensive remi...
Chapter
Full-text available
Ce chapitre explore spécifiquement les actions menées en ce sens dans différents contextes (pays à revenu élevé, intermédiaire ou faible) pour faciliter l’insertion des jeunes sur le marché du travail et favoriser un développement inclusif.
Article
Full-text available
There are predictions that in future rapid technological development could result in a significant shortage of paid work. A possible option currently debated by academics, policy makers, trade unions, employers and mass media, is a shorter working week for everyone. In this context, two important research questions that have not been asked so far a...
Article
Full-text available
This article analyses the development and use of the concept ‘job quality’ in European Union (EU) employment policy. Using a set of complementary public policy theories, it examines how both political and conceptual factors contributed to the failure to achieve any significant progress in articulating job quality in the EU’s policy objectives and g...
Article
Full-text available
Youth unemployment has become the global “wicked” policy issue for governments and multilateral agencies with many regions experiencing endemically high levels. In response, governments and international organizations have introduced more active labor market interventions to address youth unemployment. Self-employment and entrepreneurship programs...
Article
Background Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS) is characterized by uncomfortable nocturnal sensations in the legs making sedentary activities and sleep difficult, and is thus linked with psychosocial distress. Due to the symptomatology and neurobiology of RLS (disrupting brain iron and dopamine) it is likely that RLS associates with poorer health-related...
Article
Background Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS) is characterized by uncomfortable nocturnal sensations in the legs making sedentary activities and sleep difficult, and is thus linked with psychosocial distress. Due to the symptomatology and neurobiology of RLS (disrupting brain iron and dopamine) it is likely that RLS associates with poorer health-related...
Article
This study compared relations between work demands and support, work-to-family conflict (WFC) and job outcomes in Ghana and the United Kingdom. Data were obtained from 217 Ghanaian employees and 198 British employees using structured questionnaires. Results from multigroup structural equation modelling analyses showed that job pressure was positive...
Chapter
Debt is difficult to understand. There are many ways to think about debt, and what seems like common sense from one perspective looks inaccurate or incomprehensible from another point of view. Psychologists, economists, sociologists, political scientists, historians, bankers, theologians and moral philosophers have all addressed the puzzles and par...
Chapter
Research by psychologists and others has consistently found that employees experience better psychological well-being than those who are unemployed. This finding has proven remarkably robust across time and across countries, and seems to affect all groups regardless of their age, gender or social class. Finding a theoretical framework to understand...
Article
Full-text available
This study compared relations between work demands and support, work-to-family conflict (WFC) and job outcomes in Ghana and the United Kingdom. Data were obtained from 217 Ghanaian employees and 198 British employees using structured questionnaires. Results from multigroup structural equation modelling analyses showed that job pressure was positive...
Chapter
Full-text available
This book presents new theories and international empirical evidence on the state of work and employment around the world. Changes in production systems, economic conditions and regulatory conditions are posing new questions about the growing use by employers of precarious forms of work, the contradictory approaches of governments towards employmen...
Article
Full-text available
In the light of corporate scandals and the recent financial crisis, there has been an increased interest in the impact of business education on the value orientations of graduates. Yet our understanding of how students’ values change during their time at business school is limited. In this study we investigate the effects of variations in the norma...
Chapter
Full-text available
In recent years, supporting the growth of self-employment and entrepreneurship has become a key element of international organizations’ proposed strategies for promoting youth employment, particularly in lower-income countries. This chapter specifically explores self-employment and entrepreneurship interventions that have been adopted in various co...
Article
Objective: Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a neurological sensorimotor disorder characterized by uncomfortable sensations in the legs. RLS often occurs as a comorbid condition. Besides an increased risk of iron deficiency, blood donors are considered to be generally healthy. Blood donors are therefore an ideal population for studying factors assoc...
Article
Objective Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a neurological sensorimotor disorder characterized by uncomfortable sensations in the legs. RLS often occurs as a comorbid condition. Besides an increased risk of iron deficiency, blood donors are considered to be generally healthy. Blood donors are therefore an ideal population for studying factors associa...
Article
In the light of corporate scandals and the recent financial crisis, there has been an increased interest in the impact of business education on the value orientations of graduates. Yet our understanding of how students' values change during their time at business school is limited. In this study we investigate the effects of variations in the norma...
Article
Full-text available
This paper provides an overview of the key factors impacting upon the gender pay gap in the UK, Europe and Australia. Forty years after the implementation of the first equal pay legislation, the pay gap remains a key aspect of the inequalities women face in the labour market. While the overall pay gap has tended to fall in many countries over the p...
Article
Full-text available
This article examines the impact of the International Labour Organization's concept of Decent Work on development thinking and the academic literature. We attempt to answer the question of what makes a development initiative successful by comparing the decent work approach to the United Nation Development Programme's Human Development concept (in c...
Article
Full-text available
This article explores the development of concepts related to the ‘quality of employment’ in the academic literature in terms of their definition, methodological progress and ongoing policy debates. Over time, these concepts have evolved from simple studies of job satisfaction towards more comprehensive measures of job and employment quality, includ...
Article
Full-text available
This report presents a new way of investigating gender segregation by occupation. The analyses show conclusively that the nature of the occupation itself is important, above and beyond whether an occupation is male-dominated, female-dominated or mixed, and above and beyond whether an occupation is blue-collar or white-collar.
Article
Full-text available
Vulnerable workers can be expected to be more subject to direct managerial control over the work process and have little opportunity for participation in shaping their work environment. Opportunities for participation are not only in themselves desirable, but may also have beneficial effects on job quality. However, there has been little exploratio...
Article
Studies have linked cross-national variations in occupational gender segregation with various economic, social and normative characteristics of countries. This study contributes to the research on the role of normative or ‘cultural’ characteristics by examining the influence of the level of technical progress, professionalization and Christian reli...
Book
Full-text available
Despite much legislative progress in gender equality over the past 40 years, there are still gender gaps across many aspects of the labour market. Inequalities are still evident in areas such as access to the labour market, employment patterns and associated working conditions. This report explores gender differences across several dimensions of wo...
Chapter
Full-text available
While the rate of part-time work has been consistent in the EU15 in the period 2000–2005, Italy has seen a large rise in women’s part-time work over that period. The likely cause of this rise in women’s part-time work is presumed to be the Italian enactment of the EU Part-Time Work Directive. Before 1984 Italian legislation had little provision for...
Article
Full-text available
There is a scarcity of information concerning the emotional aspects of financial management. Two studies were conducted to evaluate the measurement of conscious and intuitive emotional anxiety toward one's personal finances. Along with a self-reported financial anxiety questionnaire, a modified Emotional Stroop Test (EST) and Dot-Probe Paradigm (DP...
Article
Full-text available
Conclusions: The relationship between job insecurity and psychological wellbeing seems to be remarkably unpredictable between countries, independent from their level of claimed or actual flexicurity policies. This calls into doubt one of the important claimed benefits of flexicurity – ameliorating the threat associated with job loss. Why? – Lack of...
Article
Full-text available
New technologies permit new types of organisations. This article describes and analyses one such organisation, an "officeless firm", where all employees work from their own homes and there is no central office. Drawing upon observations and interviews, the modes of communication and the nature of the interpersonal relationships that have permitted...
Article
Full-text available
Conclusions: The relationship between job insecurity and psychological wellbeing seems to be remarkably unpredictable between countries, independent from their level of claimed or actual flexicurity policies. This calls into doubt one of the important claimed benefits of flexicurity –ameliorating the threat associated with job loss. Why? Lack of kn...
Article
Full-text available
The relationship between job insecurity and psychological wellbeing seems to be unpredictable between countries, independent from their level of claimed or actual flexicurity policies. This calls into doubt one of the important claimed benefits of flexicurity – ameliorating the threat associated with job loss. Why? – Lack of knowledge about active...
Article
Full-text available
Analyses of individuals’ working lives make a variety of assumptions about the relationship between time, wellbeing and economic stress. Some assume that stress will accumulate in adverse environments, leading to chronic effects of, for instance, long-term unemployment or job insecurity. Other studies emphasize the acute effects of changes per se,...
Presentation
The relationship between job insecurity and psychological wellbeing seems to be unpredictable between countries, independent from their level of claimed or actual flexicurity policies. This calls into doubt one of the important claimed benefits of flexicurity – ameliorating the threat associated with job loss. Why? – Lack of knowledge about active...
Article
Full-text available
Flexicurity has been heralded as the solution to simultaneously maintain the well-being of employees through employment security while allowing employers to benefit from flexibility. This paper examines one of the claimed benefits that countries with flexicurity policies will reduce the stress on employees who experience job insecurity. More specif...
Article
Epidemiological studies of restless legs syndrome (RLS) have been limited by lack of a well validated patient-completed diagnostic questionnaire that has a high enough specificity to provide a reasonable positive predictive value. Most of the currently used patient completed diagnostic questionnaires have neither been validated nor included items f...
Article
The link between brain iron deficiency and RLS is now well established. In a related observation, several conditions that can deplete iron stores have been linked to increased probability of RLS. Blood donation has been linked to iron deficiency. It has thus been hypothesized that donating blood may be a risk factor for developing RLS. Two thousand...
Presentation
Full-text available
Conclusions: The relationship between job insecurity and psychological wellbeing seems to be remarkably unpredictable between countries, independent from their level of claimed or actual flexicurity policies. This calls into doubt one of the important claimed benefits of flexicurity –ameliorating the threat associated with job loss. Why? Lack of kn...
Presentation
Full-text available
Conclusions: The relationship between job insecurity and psychological wellbeing seems to be remarkably unpredictable between countries, independent from their level of claimed or actual flexicurity policies. This calls into doubt one of the important claimed benefits of flexicurity – ameliorating the threat associated with job loss. Why? – Lack of...
Article
Promoting job quality and gender equality are objectives of the European Employment Strategy (EES) in spite of a downgrading of the attention given to both in the revised employment guidelines and the re-launch of the Lisbon Process. However, advances on both of these objectives may be important complements to the employment rate targets of the EES...
Article
Gender segregation is considered to be a key structuring factor in the labour market, and is central to explanations of phenomena as diverse as the everyday experience of men’s and women’s employment to the underachievement of women and the limited impact of equal pay legislation. Studies of occupational segregation by gender tend to be polarized b...
Article
This paper describes and analyses an ‘officeless firm’, where all employees work from their own homes. Drawing upon observations and interviews, the modes of communication and the nature of the interpersonal relationships that have permitted this organisation to succeed are described, along with the challenges that face this organisation in the fut...
Article
Full-text available
and purpose: Epidemiological studies of restless legs syndrome (RLS) have been limited by lack of a well validated patient-completed diagnostic questionnaire that has a high enough specificity to provide a reasonable positive predictive value. Most of the currently used patient completed diagnostic questionnaires have neither been validated nor inc...
Article
Full-text available
New technologies permit new types of organisations. This article describes and analyses one such organisation, an "officeless firm", where all employees work from their own homes and there is no central office. Drawing upon observations and interviews, the modes of communication and the nature of the interpersonal relationships that have permitted...
Article
Gender segregation is considered to be a key structuring factor in the labour market, and is central to explanations of phenomena as diverse as the everyday experience of men's and women's employment to the underachievement of women and the limited impact of equal pay legislation.Studies of occupational segregation by gender tend to be polarized be...
Article
From 2000 the NHS was subjected to a series of far reaching reforms, the purposes of which were to increase the role of the primary care sector in commissioning and providing services, promote healthier life styles, reduce health inequality, and improve service standards. These were seen as requiring a greater leadership role from health profession...
Article
Full-text available
It is commonly asserted that high rates of entrepreneurship and superior economic performance in the United States is linked to a higher cultural tolerance of business failure. After reviewing cross country patterns of entrepreneurship we develop in this paper a measure of cultural attitudes towards failure which has two components. We term these f...
Article
The first half of this paper examines attempts to quantify changes in the intensity of work in the UK over the past forty years. A number of methodologies are critically reviewed, and it is concluded that the most reliable evidence is based on repeated cross-sectional surveys. These provide a picture of a marked net increase in the intensity of wor...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose – Temporary workers have many human resource and labour market implications. These consequences are further influenced with the introduction of new legislation relating to temporary workers. The purpose of this article is to present research on the impacts of the legislation – Fixed Term Employees Regulations and Conduct of Employment Agenc...
Article
The first half of this paper examines attempts to quantify changes in the intensity of work in the UK over the past forty years. A number of methodologies are critically reviewed, and it is concluded that the most reliable evidence is based on repeated cross-sectional surveys. These provide a picture of a marked net increase in the intensity of wor...
Chapter
2006 Fagan, C., and Burchell, B. ‘L’intensification du travail et les différences homes/femmes: conclusions des enquêtes européennes sur les conditions de travail’ [The intensification of work and gender differences: evidence from the European Working Conditions Surveys]. In P. Askennazy, D. Cartron, F. de Coninck, M, Gollac (ed.) Organisation et i...
Article
Does teleworking contribute to the likelihood of community participation or social isolation? The secondary analysis of two European Working Conditions Surveys (2000, 2001) investigated the correlates of telework. A representative sample of the economically active population included in total 32,760 employed or self-employed individuals in 15 Europ...
Article
Full-text available
This paper uses the European Working Conditions Surveys to examine the intensity of work for male and female employees. The first section gives an overview of the usefulness of the survey for examining European Union (EU) working conditions and shows how women's intensity of work has been increasing faster than that of men, so that by the year 2000...