Brandon J. Sheridan

Brandon J. Sheridan
Elon University · Department of Economics

Doctor of Philosophy

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14
Publications
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187
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Publications

Publications (14)
Article
Full-text available
Recent studies find evidence that economic growth takeoffs are strongly positively correlated with large increases in total aggregate exports. These studies often analyze the average relationship between these economic growth takeoffs and total trade flows. Therefore, these studies are somewhat limited because the average relationship masks the pot...
Article
Ever since Becker and Watts (1996 Becker, W. E., and M. Watts. 1996. Chalk and talk: A national survey on teaching undergraduate economics. American Economic Review 86 (2): 448–53.[Web of Science ®] [Google Scholar]) found that economic educators rely heavily on “chalk and talk” as a primary teaching method, economic educators have been seeking new...
Article
University class structure is changing. To accommodate working students, programmes are increasing their offerings of long night classes – some lasting as long as six hours. While these long classes may be more convenient for students, they have unintended consequences as a result of cognitive load. Using a panel of 124 students (372 observations)...
Article
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In this article, the authors discuss the results of a study of the perceptions of a national sample of economics faculty members from various institutions regarding the use of social media as a teaching tool in and out of the economics classroom. In the past few years, social media has become globally popular, and its use is ubiquitous among studen...
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Using the definition of takeoffs in a country's growth process from Aizenman and Spiegel (2010), we investigate the relationship between exports and sudden increases in economic growth. Our contribution is to use a gravity model framework to focus specifically on the extensive and intensive margins of exports, whereas much of the previous literatur...
Article
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Economics instructors have increasingly embraced the use of popular culture as a teaching resource to enhance their lectures. The use of television shows, music and media clips presumably makes economic theories, concepts, and terms more relevant to today's students. For example, shows like The Simpsons, The Office, The Big Bang Theory, Seinfeld an...
Article
Recent papers have focused attention on the potential for expansionary austerity (i.e. that cutting budget deficits may increase growth in the short run). In this paper we investigate the impact of fiscal consolidation on trade using bilateral trade data. The use of bilateral trade data allows us to demonstrate three novel empirical results. First,...
Article
Full-text available
Social media access and usage has grown rapidly in the past several years. In academia, social media is a new pedagogical tool that may be used to engage students both inside and outside the economics classroom, and impact their overall success. In this study we examine the students' view of incorporating social media in the classroom. The survey w...
Article
Why do many developing countries still rely on primary goods as their main source of export income when evidence suggests they could earn higher returns by exporting manufactured goods? I use data for a wide cross-section of countries over the period 1970-2009 and find that although increasing manufacturing exports is important for sustained econom...
Article
In many economics programs, both graduate students and new assistant professors are thrown into the classroom without guidance, with the potential for negative ramifications that can last throughout their careers as teachers. This article is a primer in which we offer unique insights into useful methods and practices for new teachers in the economi...
Article
In many economics programs, both graduate students and new assistant professors are thrown into the classroom without guidance, with the potential for negative ramifications that can last throughout their careers as teachers. This article is a primer in which we offer unique insights into useful methods and practices for new teachers in the economi...
Article
In this paper, we use a panel of the 48 contiguous US states over the period 1970–2009 to examine the dynamics of electricity demand in addressing the four hypotheses set forth in the literature: growth, conservation, neutrality, and feedback. In doing so we provide both short-run and long-run elasticity estimates for electricity demand. Recent dev...

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Projects (2)
Project
We use an augmented production function to empirically examine whether trade effects the probability or realization of sustained economic growth rates or takeoffs. Based on Pakrashi and Frijters (2017), we consider that openness episodes promote direct and indirect technological changes. While direct technological changes improve the productivity, indirect changes facilitate imitation from new markets. These channels of causality are tested establishing, at least, three empirical contributions to the exist-ing literature. First, following Feyrer (2019), we propose a robust causal relationship between trade and takeoffs by generating a time varying geographic instrument. Our takeoff equation considers a fixed effects Logit model controlling for a possible incidental parameters bias (Cruz-Gonzalez et al., 2017). Second, using the sorted effect method proposed by Chernozhukov et al. (2018), we estimate every possible partial effects of the impact of trade on probability of takeoff, in addition to the average partial effect.We then identify sub-groups of countries and their characteristics based on whether they are the most (top10%) or the least affected (bottom10%) groups. We find that increases in exogenous trade increases the probability of a takeoff by about21%(aver-age partial effect). However, the partial effects varies between14%and28%. Countries that experience the highest impact (top10%) are all developing countries (ranging from less developed to upper middle income), while countries that experience the least impact (bottom10%) are all developed economies. Finally, as a third contribution, we measure the direct technological changes through the effects of exogenous trade agreements (FTAs) on the takeoffs episodes. We observe that the effects are stronger for“deeper” FTAs, whereby countries that experience the highest impact consist primarily(80%) of developed countries.