Brandon E Jackson

Brandon E Jackson
Longwood University | Longwood · Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences

Ph.D.

About

26
Publications
5,290
Reads
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624
Citations
Additional affiliations
August 2014 - present
Longwood University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
August 2014 - present
Longwood University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
August 2013 - May 2014
Skidmore College
Position
  • Research Assistant

Publications

Publications (26)
Article
Full-text available
Stereo videography is a powerful technique for quantifying the kinematics and behavior of animals, but it can be challenging to use in an outdoor field setting. We here present a workflow and associated software for performing calibration of cameras placed in a field setting and estimating the accuracy of the resulting stereoscopic reconstructions....
Article
Full-text available
Some of the greatest transformations in vertebrate history involve developmental and evolutionary origins of avian flight. Flight is the most power-demanding mode of locomotion, and volant adult birds have many anatomical features that presumably help meet these demands. However, juvenile birds, like the first winged dinosaurs, lack many hallmarks...
Article
Full-text available
Kuznetsov and Panyutina (2022) offer a reanalysis of the kinematic and force plate data previously published by Bundle and Dial (2003). Their intention is to describe instantaneous wing forces during wing-assisted incline running (WAIR), focusing particularly on the upstroke phase. Based on their interpretation of wing forces and muscle function, t...
Article
Tails are a defining characteristic of chordates and show enormous diversity in function and shape. Although chordate tails share a common evolutionary and genetic-developmental origin, tails are extremely versatile in morphology and function. For example, tails can be short or long, thin or thick, feathered or spiked, and they can be used for prop...
Article
Full-text available
Billions of birds fatally collide with human-made structures each year. These mortalities have consequences for population viability and conservation of endangered species. This source of human-wildlife conflict also places constraints on various industries. Furthermore, with continued increases in urbanization, the incidence of collisions continue...
Article
Synopsis: Flight is the defining characteristic of birds, yet the mechanisms through which flight ability develops are only beginning to be understood. Wing-assisted incline running (WAIR) and controlled flapping descent (CFD) are behaviors that may offer significant adaptive benefits to developing birds. Recent research into these forms of locomo...
Article
Full-text available
Ecological, behavioral and biomechanical studies often need to quantify animal movement and behavior in three dimensions. In laboratory studies, a common tool to accomplish these measurements is the use of multiple, calibrated high-speed cameras. Until very recently, the complexity, weight and cost of such cameras have made their deployment in fiel...
Data
Ontogeny of forelimb kinematics. Mean downstroke and upstroke kinematics for 7–8 day old (red), 11–12 day old (orange), 18 day old (green), and adult (purple) birds engaged in wing-assisted incline running on 60–65° inclines. (MOV)
Data
Wing-assisted incline running in a chick with long leg feathers. (MOV)
Data
X-ray footage of chukar partridges engaged in wing-assisted incline running. 7–8 day old, 11–12 day old, and 18 day old birds flap-running on 60–65° inclines, in lateral view; adult bird flap-running on 65–80° inclines (65° data from [60]). (MOV)
Data
Rotoscoped x-ray footage of chukar partridges engaged in wing-assisted incline running. Rotoscoped forelimbs and hind limbs of 7–8 day old and 18 day old birds flap-running on 60–65° inclines, in lateral and dorsal view. (MOV)
Data
Ontogeny of hind limb kinematics. Mean stance and swing kinematics for 7–8 day old (red), 11–12 day old (orange), 18 day old (green), and adult (purple) birds engaged in wing-assisted incline running on 60–65° inclines. (MOV)
Data
All supporting tables, figures, and boxes. (PDF)
Conference Paper
Three-dimensional motion capture based on high-speed videography is a staple technique of comparative biomechanics. Historically, the necessary equipment has been cumbersome and expensive, thus largely precluding use of the technique in natural settings, by specialists in other fields (e.g. animal behavior, ecology), and in financially restricted s...
Article
Cliff Swallows (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) are highly maneuverable social birds that often forage and fly in large open spaces. Here we used multi-camera videography to measure the three dimensional kinematics of their natural flight maneuvers in the field. Specifically, we collected data on tandem flights, defined as two birds maneuvering together....
Article
Full-text available
Wing-assisted incline running (WAIR) in birds combines the use of the wings and hindlimbs to ascend otherwise insurmountable obstacles. It is a means of escape in precocial birds before they are able to fly, and it is used by a variety of juvenile and adult birds as an alternative to flight for exploiting complex three-dimensional environments at t...
Article
Full-text available
Avian locomotor burst performance (e.g. acceleration, maneuverability) decreases with increasing body size and has significant implications for the survivorship, ecology and evolution of birds. However, the underlying mechanism of this scaling relationship has been elusive. The most cited mechanistic hypothesis posits that wingbeat frequency alone...
Article
Full-text available
Within Galliformes, megapods (brush turkey, malleefowl, scrubfowl) exhibit unique forms of parental care and growth. Hatchlings receive no post-hatching parental care and exhibit the most exaggerated precocial development of all extant birds, hatching with fully developed, flight-capable forelimbs. Rather than flying up to safety, young birds prefe...
Article
Full-text available
Developing animals are particularly vulnerable to predation. Hence, precocial young of many taxa develop predator escape performance that rivals that of adults. Ontogenetically unique among vertebrates, birds transition from hind limb to forelimb dependence for escape behaviours, so developmental investment for immediate gains in running performanc...
Article
Full-text available
The evolution of avian flight remains one of biology's major controversies, with a long history of functional interpretations of fossil forms given as evidence for either an arboreal or cursorial origin of flight. Despite repeated emphasis on the 'wing-stroke' as a necessary avenue of investigation for addressing the evolution of flight, no empiric...

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