Brandon M Fritz

Brandon M Fritz
Indiana University School of Medicine | IUSOM · Department of Psychiatry

PhD

About

26
Publications
1,637
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180
Citations
Introduction
My research is centered on understanding the neurobehavioral consequences of alcohol exposure. More specifically, one of my interests is how a genetic predisposition for high alcohol consumption associates with acute responses to alcohol. Recently, I have also explored the effect of caffeine on alcohol consumption and intoxication in a mouse model of binge drinking which has furthered my interest in the role of the adenosine system in alcohol/substance use. In my current postdoctoral training position, I am using slice electrophysiology and transgenic mouse technologies to examine alcohol exposure effects within specific striatal circuits.
Additional affiliations
August 2010 - present
Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis
Position
  • PhD Student
August 2010 - November 2015
Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (26)
Article
The opioid crisis has contributed to a growing population of children exposed to opioids during fetal development; however, many of the long-term effects of opioid exposure on development are unknown. We previously demonstrated that opioids have deleterious effects on endocannabinoid plasticity at glutamate synapses in the dorsal striatum of adoles...
Preprint
Full-text available
Mu opioid receptors (MORs) are expressed in the dorsal striatum, a brain region that mediates goal-directed (via the dorsomedial striatum), and habitual (via the dorsolateral striatum, DLS) behaviors. Our previous work indicates that glutamate transmission is depressed when MORs are activated in the dorsal striatum, inducing MOR-mediated long-term...
Article
Full-text available
The medial (DMS) and lateral (DLS) dorsal striatum differentially drive goal-directed and habitual/compulsive behaviors, respectively, and are implicated in a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders. These subregions receive distinct inputs from cortical and thalamic regions which uniquely determine dorsal striatal activity and function. Adenosine A...
Article
The development of selectively bred high and low alcohol‐preferring mice (HAP and LAP, respectively) has allowed for an assessment of the polygenetic risk for pathological alcohol consumption and phenotypes associated with alcohol use disorder (AUD). Accumulating evidence indicates that the dorsal striatum (DS) is a central node in the neurocircuit...
Article
Full-text available
The role of Mu opioid receptor (MOR)‐mediated regulation of GABA transmission in opioid reward is well established. Much less is known about MOR‐mediated regulation of glutamate transmission in the brain and how this relates to drug reward. We previously found that MORs inhibit glutamate transmission at synapses that express the Type 2 vesicular gl...
Article
Background: Although it is widely acknowledged that the risk of developing an alcohol use disorder (AUD) is strongly influenced by genetic factors, very little is known about how this genetic predisposition may alter neurotransmission in a way that promotes AUD susceptibility. The dorsal striatum has garnered increased attention as a brain region...
Article
Full-text available
Drugs of abuse, including alcohol, ablate the expression of specific forms of long-term synaptic depression (LTD) at glutamatergic synapses in dorsal striatum (DS), a brain region involved in goal-directed and habitual behaviors. This loss of LTD is associated with altered DS-dependent behavior. Given the role of the µ-opioid receptor (MOR) in beha...
Article
Understanding neuroadaptations involved in obesity is critical for developing new approaches to treatment. Diet-induced neuroadaptations within the dorsal striatum have the capacity to drive excessive food seeking and consumption. Five week old C57BL/6J mice consumed a high-fat, high-sugar 'western diet' (WD) or a control 'standard diet' (SD) for 1...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Binge co-consumption of highly caffeinated energy drinks with alcohol (ethanol [EtOH]) has become a common practice among adolescents/young adults and has been associated with an increased incidence of hazardous behaviors. Animal models are critical in advancing our understanding the neurobehavioral consequences of this form of binge d...
Conference Paper
Adolescent binge consumption of caffeinated alcoholic beverages is a growing concern. Caffeine may mask alcohol’s sedative effects, increasing risk for continued drinking despite significant intoxication. However, the available human data is equivocal. The goal of the current work was to adapt the Drinking-in-the-Dark paradigm to model adolescent b...
Article
Background: The combination of highly caffeinated "energy drinks" with alcohol (ethanol [EtOH]) has become popular among young adults and intoxication via such beverages has been associated with an elevated risk for harmful behaviors. However, there are discrepancies in the human literature regarding the effect of caffeine on alcohol intoxication,...
Article
Initial sensitivity to ethanol (EtOH) and the capacity to develop acute functional tolerance (AFT) to its adverse effects may influence the amount of alcohol consumed and may also predict future alcohol use patterns. The current study assessed sensitivity and AFT to the ataxic and hypnotic effects of EtOH in the first replicate of mice (HDID-1) sel...
Article
Propensity to develop acute functional (or within session) tolerance to alcohol (ethanol) may influence the amount of alcohol consumed, with higher drinking associated with greater acute functional tolerance (AFT). The goal of this study was to assess this potential correlated response between alcohol preference and AFT in second and third replicat...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
Hi all,
I am currently using a chlorided silver wire as a reference electrode for fast scan cyclic voltammetry. I am consistently having a problem where the chloride dissolves off of the wire at a far faster rate than expected. I know this does not have to do with the chloriding process used because this happened to an electrode made in-house and a factory made one. Any suggestions about why this may be happening would be greatly appreciated!

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