Brandi Wren

Brandi Wren
Colorado College & Purdue University · Anthropology

PhD

About

16
Publications
1,582
Reads
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46
Citations
Introduction
I am a primatologist and biological anthropologist with a background in behavioral ecology and primate-parasite ecology. I have field experience working with a range of wildlife species from salamanders to monkeys in a variety of regions. I have laboratory experience in classical parasitology and immunofluorescence microscopy as well as clinical experience working in veterinary clinics. Visit my interactive CV here: https://prezi.com/view/ekPiFNwqySbMuVtj3NgH/
Additional affiliations
January 2020 - May 2020
Colorado College
Position
  • Lecturer
August 2018 - December 2018
Purdue University
Position
  • Lecturer
January 2017 - May 2017
Colorado College
Position
  • Lecturer
Education
August 2006 - May 2013
Purdue University
Field of study
  • Biological Anthropology
August 2003 - May 2006
Ball State University
Field of study
  • Biological Anthropology
August 1996 - December 1999
Ball State University
Field of study
  • Anthropology & Biology

Publications

Publications (16)
Article
Full-text available
Social grooming in the animal kingdom is common and serves several functions, from removing ectoparasites to maintaining social bonds between conspecifics. We examined whether time spent grooming with others in a highly social mammal species was associated with infection status for gastrointestinal parasites. Of six parasites detected, one (Trichur...
Article
There are many known benefits of social grooming among primates, including maintenance of social relationships, removal of ectoparasites, and improved physiological condition. Recently, however, researchers have noted that social grooming and social contact may also present a significant cost by facilitating transmission of some parasites and patho...
Article
Full-text available
Galagos, or bushbabies, are small nocturnal primates found exclusively in sub-Saharan Africa. Three species are known to inhabit the Southern African sub-region, including Galago moholi, Galagoides granti, and Otolemur crassicaudatus (Nash et al. 1989; Yokwana et al. 2014). Galago moholi (the southern lesser bushbaby) averages 158g and 438mm in tot...
Article
Full-text available
Fecal samples from 38 individually recognized vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops) from Loskop Dam Nature Reserve, South Africa, were examined for helminths. Analysis of 272 fecal samples revealed that all individuals were infected. Eggs of 5 helminth species were recovered. Prevalence of infection for Trichuris sp. was 92%, Oesophagostomum sp. wa...
Preprint
Full-text available
Social grooming in the animal kingdom is common and serves several functions, from removing ectoparasites to maintaining social bonds between conspecifics. We examined whether time spent grooming with others in a highly social mammal species was associated with infection status for gastrointestinal parasites. Of six parasites detected, one ( Trichu...
Article
Full-text available
Galagos are a poorly studied group of nocturnal primates endemic to sub-Saharan Africa, particularly in regard to distribution in southern Africa. We conducted a population survey of Galago moholi along the road system of Loskop Dam Nature Reserve in Mpumalanga, South Africa, during the winter months of June and July, 2011. Results from 151 km of t...
Conference Paper
This study examines associations between social grooming and parasitic infection in wild vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops) in Loskop Valley, South Africa. Social grooming has been viewed as a behavioral strategy to help hosts rid themselves of parasites (i.e., the hygiene hypothesis). Social contact has been shown to be beneficial to the immune...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
291 Social grooming among animals has long been viewed as a behavioral strategy aimed at reducing the numbers of parasites on wild animals. It is well known that parasitic organisms have the potential to reduce host fitness by suppressing the immune system and increasing the host's susceptibility to other diseases. Social grooming has thus been gen...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Fifty-eight fecal samples from wild and captive vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus [Cercopithecus] aethiops) at a sanctuary near Tzaneen, Limpopo Province, South Africa, were collected and analyzed to determine which species of gastrointestinal parasites they harbored, and differences in infection rates were examined. Three parasites were found, including...
Conference Paper
Fifty-one fecal samples from both wild and captive vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus [Cercopithecus] aethiops) at a sanctuary near Tzaneen, Limpopo Province, South Africa, were collected and analyzed to determine which species of gastrointestinal parasites they harbored, and differences in infection rates were examined. Three parasites were found, includ...

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Projects

Projects (5)
Project
This project examines the social behavior of South African nonhuman primates.
Project
This project consists of both research I advise on and a project I am currently establishing on human-primate interactions in southern Africa.
Archived project
This was my Masters thesis research on gastrointestinal parasites of captive sanctuary and wild vervet monkeys in South Africa.