Bradley Voytek

Bradley Voytek
University of California, San Diego | UCSD · Cognitive Science, Neuroscience, and Data Science

PhD

About

93
Publications
14,207
Reads
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3,996
Citations
Additional affiliations
September 2011 - present
University of California, San Francisco
Position
  • PostDoc Position
June 2010 - May 2011
University of California, Berkeley
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
August 2004 - May 2010
University of California, Berkeley
Field of study
  • Neuroscience
August 1998 - May 2002
University of Southern California
Field of study
  • Psychology

Publications

Publications (93)
Article
Full-text available
Event-related potentials (ERPs) are a common approach for investigating the neural basis of cognition and disease. There exists a vast and growing literature of ERP-related articles, the scale of which motivates the need for efficient and systematic meta-analytic approaches for characterizing this research. Here we present an automated text-mining...
Article
Full-text available
A growing body of literature suggests that the explicit parameterization of neural power spectra is important for the appropriate physiological interpretation of periodic and aperiodic electroencephalogram (EEG) activity. In this paper, we discuss why parameterization is an imperative step for developmental cognitive neuroscientists interested in c...
Article
Full-text available
Beginning at early stages, human Alzheimer’s disease (AD) brains manifest hyperexcitability, contributing to subsequent extensive synapse loss, which has been linked to cognitive dysfunction. No current therapy for AD is disease-modifying. Part of the problem with AD drug discovery is that transgenic mouse models have been poor predictors of potent...
Article
Full-text available
A hallmark of electrophysiological brain activity is its 1/f-like spectrum - power decreases with increasing frequency. The steepness of this 'roll-off' is approximated by the spectral exponent, which in invasively recorded neural populations reflects the balance of excitatory to inhibitory neural activity (E:I balance). Here, we first establish th...
Article
Full-text available
Neuronal activity within the premotor region HVC is tightly synchronized to, and crucial for, the articulate production of learned song in birds. Characterizations of this neural activity detail patterns of sequential bursting in small, carefully identified subsets of neurons in the HVC population. The dynamics of HVC are well described by these ch...
Preprint
Event-related potentials (ERPs) are a common approach for investigating the neural basis of cognition and disease. There exists a vast and growing literature of ERP-related articles, the scale of which motivates the need for efficient and systematic meta-analytic approaches for characterizing this research. Here we present an automated text-mining...
Article
Full-text available
In invasive electrophysiological recordings, a variety of neural oscillations can be detected across the cortex, with overlap in space and time. This overlap complicates measurement of neural oscillations using standard referencing schemes, like common average or bipolar referencing. Here, we illustrate the effects of spatial mixing on measuring ne...
Preprint
Full-text available
Cortical dynamics obey a 1/f power law, exhibiting an exponential decay of spectral power with increasing frequency. The slope and offset of this 1/f decay reflect the timescale and magnitude of aperiodic neural activity, respectively. These properties are tightly linked to cellular and circuit mechanisms (e.g. excitation:inhibition balance, firing...
Article
Neural oscillations are ubiquitous across recording methodologies and species, broadly associated with cognitive tasks, and amenable to computational modelling that investigates neural circuit generating mechanisms and neural population dynamics. Because of this, neural oscillations offer an exciting potential opportunity for linking theory, physio...
Preprint
A growing body of literature points to the importance of the explicit parameterization of neural power spectra for the appropriate physiological interpretation of periodic and aperiodic electroencephalogram (EEG) activity. In this paper, we discuss why parameterization is an imperative step for developmental cognitive neuroscientists interested in...
Preprint
Full-text available
Neural oscillations are one of the most well-known macroscopic phenomena observed in the nervous system, and the benefits of oscillatory coding have been the topic of frequent analysis. Many of these studies focused on communication between populations which were already oscillating, and sought to understand how synchrony and communication interact...
Preprint
Neural oscillations are ubiquitous across recording methodologies and species, broadly associated with cognitive tasks, and amenable to computational modeling that investigates neural circuit generating mechanisms and mesoscale dynamics. Because of this, neural oscillations may offer an exciting potential opportunity for linking theory, physiology,...
Preprint
Full-text available
In invasive electrophysiological recordings, a variety of neuronal oscillations can be detected across the cortex, with overlap in space and time. This overlap complicates measurement of neuronal oscillations using standard referencing schemes, like common average or bipolar referencing. Here, we illustrate the effects of spatial mixing on measurin...
Article
Full-text available
Neuronal oscillations emerge in early human development. These periodic oscillations are thought to rapidly change in infancy and stabilize during maturity. Given their numerous connections to physiological and cognitive processes, understanding the trajectory of oscillatory development is important for understanding healthy human brain development...
Preprint
Full-text available
A hallmark of electrophysiological brain activity is its 1/f-like spectrum - power decreases with increasing frequency. The steepness of this roll-off is approximated by the spectral exponent, which in invasively recorded neural populations reflects the balance of excitatory to inhibitory neural activity (E:I balance). Here, we first demonstrate th...
Article
The sensory and cognitive abilities of the mammalian neocortex are underpinned by intricate columnar and laminar circuits formed from an array of diverse neuronal populations. One approach to determining how interactions between these circuit components give rise to complex behavior is to investigate the rules by which cortical circuits are formed...
Article
Full-text available
Nolan and Temple Lang’s Computing in the Statistics Curricula (2010) advocated for a shift in statistical education to broadly include computing. In the time since, individuals with training in both computing and statistics have become increasingly employable in the burgeoning data science field. In response, universities have developed new courses...
Article
Full-text available
Electrophysiological signals exhibit both periodic and aperiodic properties. Periodic oscillations have been linked to numerous physiological, cognitive, behavioral and disease states. Emerging evidence demonstrates that the aperiodic component has putative physiological interpretations and that it dynamically changes with age, task demands and cog...
Article
Full-text available
Complex cognitive functions such as working memory and decision-making require information maintenance over seconds to years, from transient sensory stimuli to long-term contextual cues. While theoretical accounts predict the emergence of a corresponding hierarchy of neuronal timescales, direct electrophysiological evidence across the human cortex...
Article
Band ratio measures, computed as the ratio of power between two frequency bands, are a common analysis measure in neuroelectrophysiological recordings. Band ratio measures are typically interpreted as reflecting quantitative measures of periodic, or oscillatory, activity. This assumes that the measure reflects relative powers of distinct periodic c...
Preprint
Full-text available
Neuronal oscillations emerge in early human development. These periodic oscillations are thought to rapidly change in infancy and stabilize during maturity. Given their numerous connections to physiological and cognitive processes, as well as their pathological divergence, understanding the trajectory of oscillatory development is important for und...
Preprint
Full-text available
Neuronal activity within the premotor region HVC is tightly synchronized to, and crucial for, the articulate production of learned song in birds. Characterizations of this neural activity typically focuses on patterns of sequential bursting in small carefully identified subsets of single neurons in the HVC population. Much less is known about popul...
Article
Neural oscillations are observed ubiquitously in the mammalian brain, but their stability is known to be rather variable. Some oscillations are tonic and last for seconds or even minutes. Other oscillations appear as unstable bursts. Likewise, some oscillations rely on excitatory AMPAergic synapses, but others are GABAergic and inhibitory. Why this...
Preprint
Full-text available
Complex cognitive functions such as working memory and decision-making require the maintenance of information over many timescales, from transient sensory stimuli to long-term contextual cues ¹ . However, while theoretical accounts predict that a corresponding hierarchy of neuronal timescales likely emerges as a result of graded variations in recur...
Article
Full-text available
Healthy aging is associated with a multitude of structural changes in the brain. These physical age-related changes are accompanied by increased variability in neural activity of all kinds, and this increased variability, collectively referred to as “neural noise,” is argued to contribute to age-related cognitive decline. In this study, we examine...
Preprint
Full-text available
A common analysis measure for neuro-electrophysiological recordings is to compute the power ratio between two frequency bands. Applications of band ratio measures include investigations of cognitive processes as well as biomarkers for conditions such as attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. Band ratio measures are typically interpreted as refle...
Article
Full-text available
The Brain Imaging Data Structure (BIDS) is a community-driven specification for organizing neuroscience data and metadata with the aim to make datasets more transparent, reusable, and reproducible. Intracranial electroencephalography (iEEG) data offer a unique combination of high spatial and temporal resolution measurements of the living human brai...
Preprint
Full-text available
Accumulating evidence across species indicates that brain oscillations are superimposed upon an aperiodic 1/f - like power spectrum. Maturational changes in neuronal oscillations have not been assessed in tandem with this underlying aperiodic spectrum. The current study uncovers co-maturation of the aperiodic component alongside the periodic compon...
Article
Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by hyperactivity/impulsivity and inattentiveness. Efforts towards the development of a biologically based diagnostic test have identified differences in the EEG power spectrum, most consistently reported is an increased ratio of theta to beta power...
Article
Structural and transcriptional changes during early brain maturation follow fixed developmental programs defined by genetics. However, whether this is true for functional network activity remains unknown, primarily due to experimental inaccessibility of the initial stages of the living human brain. Here, we developed human cortical organoids that d...
Article
Background: Subcallosal cingulate cortex deep brain stimulation (SCC-DBS) is an experimental therapy for treatment resistant depression (TRD). Refinement and optimization of SCC-DBS will benefit from increased study of SCC electrophysiology in context of ongoing high frequency SCC-DBS therapy. Objective: 7-month observation of frequency-domain 1...
Article
Neural oscillations are widely studied using methods based on the Fourier transform, which models data as sums of sinusoids. This has successfully uncovered numerous links between oscillations and cognition or disease. However, neural data are nonsinusoidal, and these nonsinusoidal features are increasingly linked to a variety of behavioral and cog...
Article
Neural activity in the β frequency range (13-30 Hz) is excessively synchronized in Parkinson's disease (PD). Previous work using invasive intracranial recordings and non-invasive scalp electroencephalography (EEG) has shown that correlations between β phase and broad-band γ (>50 Hz) amplitude [i.e., phase amplitude coupling (PAC)] are elevated in P...
Preprint
Full-text available
Neural oscillations are observed ubiquitously in the mammalian brain, but their stability is known to be rather variable. Some oscillations are tonic and last for seconds or even minutes. Other oscillations appear as unstable bursts . Likewise, some oscillations rely on excitatory AMPAergic synapses, but others are GABAergic and inhibitory. Why thi...
Preprint
Full-text available
Neural activity in the beta frequency range (13-30 Hz) is excessively synchronized in Parkinson's Disease (PD). Previous work using invasive intracranial recordings and non-invasive scalp electroencephalography (EEG) has shown that correlations between beta phase and broadband gamma amplitude (i.e., phase-amplitude coupling) are elevated in PD, per...
Article
Full-text available
SETD5, a gene linked to intellectual disability (ID) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD), is a member of the SET-domain family and encodes a putative histone methyltransferase (HMT). To date, the mechanism by which SETD5 haploinsufficiency causes ASD/ID remains an unanswered question. Setd5 is the highly conserved mouse homolog, and although the Set...
Preprint
Full-text available
Intracranial electroencephalography (iEEG) data offer a unique combination of high spatial and temporal resolution measures of the living human brain. However, data collection is limited to highly specialized clinical environments. To improve internal (re)use and external sharing of these unique data, we present a structure for storing and sharing...
Preprint
Full-text available
Brain rhythms are nearly always analyzed in the spectral domain in terms of their power, phase, and frequency. While this conventional approach has uncovered spike-field coupling, as well as correlations to normal behaviors and pathological states, emerging work has highlighted the physiological and behavioral importance of multiple novel oscillati...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background Neural oscillations are often quantified as average power relative to a cognitive, perceptual, and/or behavioral task. This is commonly done using Fourier-based techniques, such as Welch’s method for estimating the power spectral density, and/or by estimating narrowband oscillatory power across trials, conditions, and/or groups. The core...
Preprint
Full-text available
Structural and transcriptional changes during early brain maturation follow fixed developmental programs defined by genetics. However, whether this is true for functional network activity remains unknown, primarily due to experimental inaccessibility of the initial stages of the living human brain. Here, we developed cortical organoids that spontan...
Preprint
Full-text available
Schizophrenia has been associated with separate irregularities in several neural oscillatory frequency bands, including theta, alpha, and gamma. Our multivariate classification of human EEG suggests that instead of irregularities in many frequency bands, schizophrenia-related electrophysiological differences may better be explained by an overall sh...
Article
Full-text available
It is widely assumed that distributed neuronal networks are fundamental to the functioning of the brain. Consistent spike timing between neurons is thought to be one of the key principles for the formation of these networks. This can involve synchronous spiking or spiking with time delays, forming spike sequences when the order of spiking is consis...
Preprint
Full-text available
Oscillations can improve neural coding by grouping action potentials into synchronous windows, but this same effect harms coding when action potentials become over-synchronized. Diseases ranging from Parkinson's to epilepsy suggest that over-synchronization can lead to pathology, but the precise boundary separating healthy from pathological synchro...
Preprint
Full-text available
Neural oscillations are widely studied using methods based on the Fourier transform, which models data as sums of sinusoids. For decades these Fourier-based approaches have successfully uncovered links between oscillations and cognition or disease. However, because of the fundamental sinusoidal basis, these methods might not fully capture neural os...
Preprint
Electrophysiological signals across species and recording scales exhibit both periodic and aperiodic features. Periodic oscillations have been widely studied and linked to numerous physiological, cognitive, behavioral, and disease states, while the aperiodic “background” 1/f component of neural power spectra has received far less attention. Most an...
Article
Full-text available
Should scientists use social media? Why practice open science? What is data science? Ten years ago, these phrases hardly existed. Now they are ubiquitous. Here I argue that these phenomena are inextricably linked and reflect similar underlying social and technological transformations. In this NeuroView, Voytek argues that several major social and t...
Preprint
Full-text available
The first recordings of human brain activity in 1929 revealed a striking 8-12 Hz oscillation in the visual cortex. During the intervening 90 years, these alpha oscillations have been linked to numerous physiological and cognitive processes. However, because of the vast and seemingly contradictory cognitive and physiological processes to which it ha...
Article
Full-text available
Neural circuits sit in a dynamic balance between excitation (E) and inhibition (I). Fluctuations in E:I balance have been shown to influence neural computation, working memory, and information flow, while more drastic shifts and aberrant E:I patterns are implicated in numerous neurological and psychiatric disorders. Current methods for measuring E:...
Article
Daily experiences demand both focused and broad allocation of attention for us to interact efficiently with our complex environments. Many types of attention have shown age-related decline, although there is also evidence that such deficits may be remediated with cognitive training. However, spatial attention abilities have shown inconsistent age-r...
Article
Full-text available
Oscillations in neural activity play a critical role in neural computation and communication. There is intriguing new evidence that the nonsinusoidal features of the oscillatory waveforms may inform underlying physiological and pathophysiological characteristics. Timedomain waveform analysis approaches stand in contrast to traditional Fourier-based...
Article
Our attentional focus is constantly shifting: In one moment, our attention may be intently concentrated on a specific spot, whereas in another moment we might spread our attention more broadly. Although much is known about the mechanisms by which we shift our visual attention from place to place, relatively little is known about how we shift the ap...
Article
Oscillations are a prevalent feature of brain recordings. They are believed to play key roles in neural communication and computation. Current analysis methods for studying neural oscillations often implicitly assume that the oscillations are sinusoidal. While these approaches have proven fruitful, we show here that there are numerous instances in...
Preprint
Full-text available
Neural circuits sit in a dynamic balance between excitation (E) and inhibition (I). Fluctuations in this E:I balance have been shown to influence neural computation, working memory, and information processing. While more drastic shifts and aberrant E:I patterns are implicated in numerous neurological and psychiatric disorders, current methods for m...
Article
Alpha oscillations (7-14Hz) are modulated in response to visual temporal and spatial cues. However, the neural response to alerting cues is less explored, as is how this response is affected by healthy aging. Using scalp EEG, we examined how visual cortical alpha activity relates to working memory performance. Younger (20-30 years) and older (60-70...
Article
Full-text available
Digital data of all types are being created at an ever-increasing rate, doubling approximately every two years. Annual data creation rates are estimated to reach 44 trillion gigabytes by 2020 [1]. Similarly, the rate at which primary scientific data are being collected is accelerating [2]. This astounding growth in scientific data creation has led...
Preprint
Full-text available
Our attentional focus is constantly shifting: in one moment our vision may be intently concentrated on a specific spot, while in another moment we might spread our attention more broadly. While much is known about the mechanisms by which we shift our visual attention from place to place, relatively little is know about how we shift the aperture of...
Preprint
Full-text available
Alpha oscillations are modulated in response to visual temporal and spatial cues, However, the neural response to alerting cues is less explored, as is how this response is affected by healthy aging. Using scalp EEG, we examined how visual cortical alpha activity relates to working memory performance. Younger (20-30 years) and older (60-70 years) p...
Preprint
Full-text available
Parkinson’s disease (PD) is associated with abnormal beta oscillations (13-30 Hz) in the basal ganglia and motor cortex (M1). Recent reports show that M1 beta-high gamma (50-200 Hz) phase-amplitude coupling (PAC) is exaggerated in PD and is reduced following acute deep brain stimulation (DBS). Here we analyze invasive M1 electrocorticography record...
Article
Full-text available
Aging is associated with performance decrements across multiple cognitive domains. The neural noise hypothesis, a dominant view of the basis of this decline, posits that aging is accompanied by an increase in spontaneous, noisy baseline neural activity. Here we analyze data from two different groups of human subjects: intracranial electrocorticogra...
Article
Full-text available
Humans have a capacity for hierarchical cognitive control-the ability to simultaneously control immediate actions while holding more abstract goals in mind. Neuropsychological and neuroimaging evidence suggests that hierarchical cognitive control emerges from a frontal architecture whereby prefrontal cortex coordinates neural activity in the motor...